First, but quality Bandsaw purchase


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6 hours ago, wtnhighlander said:

Lower amps means less heat created in the motor, which means longer life.

 

That statement generally is true, but as long as the circuit to the machine is within code requirements for voltage drop, the motor will not generate any more heat on 120V than on 240V.

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10 hours ago, drzaius said:

That statement generally is true, but as long as the circuit to the machine is within code requirements for voltage drop, the motor will not generate any more heat on 120V than on 240V.

I also understand this to be true:  the higher voltage helps only with resistance losses.  If the run to the machine is short, these should be negligible.  I'm not aware of an opportunity for improving resistance losses in the motor windings, but I'm certainly willing to be educated.

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4 hours ago, Pondhockey said:

Yes.  This is what allows more devices to run on the same circuit.

I am sure this was just a word choice issue in the middle of the morning, but please allow one follow up. Many of the tools that ask for 240v or are variable, are wired that way to make breaker loads more manageable. My 240v circuits are all dedicated to one tool/appliance. Do you really run more than one tool on the same 240 concurrently?

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On 11/27/2017 at 2:39 PM, LazarusDB said:

I think we're quite lucky these days to have so many good choices.

Ok, I'm going to revert to my photography background for a minute here.

In the better digital cameras today there are *no bad choices* -- Fuji, Sony, Canon, Nikon, Pentax, etc.

The choices in woodworking equipment seem much the same. Get past the smaller hobby units and they're all pretty good. Choose based on potential future need and you're all set. Unless you just go Powermatic and employ the old computer adage "Nobody was ever fired for recommending IBM." That would seem to answer all the questions.

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3 hours ago, C Shaffer said:

I am sure this was just a word choice issue in the middle of the morning, but please allow one follow up. Many of the tools that ask for 240v or are variable, are wired that way to make breaker loads more manageable. My 240v circuits are all dedicated to one tool/appliance. Do you really run more than one tool on the same 240 concurrently?

I do not; primarily because I use one tool at a time.  Although it was my intention to run the dust collector on the same circuit as the table saw (when the unit arrived, it was set up for 120, and uses up most of that circuit's capacity.)

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Hate to throw a wrench in this, but I am also in the market for a bandsaw-setting up a shop from ground zero. I am leaning heavily towards a Felder FB510. I agree with Craver, buy quality. I'm going to buy this shop once and have it for the next 25-30 years. 

Does anyone have pros/cons on the FB510? Anyone have a recommendation for a good, quality blade?

 

Thanks!

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On 12/3/2017 at 7:33 PM, Jeffm510 said:

Hate to throw a wrench in this, but I am also in the market for a bandsaw-setting up a shop from ground zero. I am leaning heavily towards a Felder FB510. I agree with Craver, buy quality. I'm going to buy this shop once and have it for the next 25-30 years. 

Does anyone have pros/cons on the FB510? Anyone have a recommendation for a good, quality blade?

 

Thanks!

I'm sure it's a wonderful machine, as I would expect from anything with that brand name on it.   From everything I've read, 20" is the smallest saw that a 1" Lenox Woodmaster CT  1.3 tpi will run on.   That saw lists the wheel size as 19-5/8", which is awfully close to 20", so I expect it will run that blade.   If it will, and you end up getting it, order that blade from bandsawbladesdirect, and don't even bother to look at anything else for resawing.

I didn't look at the price of that saw, but if your shop is large enough, I'd pick a cheaper 24", like a MM, keep it set up for resawing, and get a 14" for running smaller blades on.  You don't really need a fancy 14", especially if you have a big one dedicated to resawing.  If I was building from scratch, with new machines, I'd get a MM24, and a Rikon 10-326.

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