Cygnus A

So is face jointing long boards not needed?

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I was watching this Diresta video and he didnt face joint the long boards for a table top. He just edge jointed and ran through the planer. I was wondering how to make a large top without losing much thickness. Is this good idea? Bad idea? 

 

 

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Bad idea. If you happen to have extremely flat boards its possible. But relying on hardware or glue joints to make boards flat is a recipe for disaster in glue-up and after.

The longer the board the more power it has to bend out of shape over time. Face jointing makes it flat in a "resting" state if you will.

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It certainly depends on how flat your lumber is to start with.  You can flatten boards a few different way if they won't fit on your jointer.

If they're pretty flat, you can skip plane and then plane the other side.

You can build a sled for the planer and shim the board - plane flat - remove from the sled and plane the opposite side

You could do this same operation on a drum sander but, that's not really what a drum sander is for

You can do some hand planing to make a good reference surface for the planer

You could build a router sled and flatten with the router

 

And, I'm sure there's some others that I didn't mention.  I recently did a project where I had a pretty flat board to start with so, just skip planed and then planed the other side flat.

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27 minutes ago, Minnesota Steve said:

 

straight_2__78902.1512397519.386.513.jpg

^ Wrong! ^

On face jointing i'm going to make the arguement of it depends.

Does it matter that the 1/4" panels that i glued into a cabinet door are bowed slightly? Nope they are going to get held flat by the groove. Would i want a 6/4 table top to be anything other than perfectly flat heck no that's just asking for problems.

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A couple of things. He may not have shown every step. Also, jointing, planing and resawing can all release tension that results in wood movement.  If your boards are already flat and dry, the less you mess with them the better off you are. 

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This is why having a wide jointer is best. Not having to make decisions like this. If the board looks pretty straight, 99% of the world ignores it and it will most likely warp/twist/cause SOME sort of issue down the road because it isn't flat. Might not be in the next 5 years.. but it will cause someone grief.

Having a wide jointer saves the question of "is it flat enough". I've had 8/4 boards that looked pretty damn flat. Marked them up with chalk or pencil, ran the over the jointer and wow... not very flat at all.

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Cut it into sections that approach being flat. Rip any of those that have a twist on the bandsaw. Flatten with a jig, sled jointer , whatever then plane the other side parallel. Then and only then can you make any plans for a board like that !

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He's even got a monster jointer.  What is that, 12 inches or is it 16? 

It seemed pretty clear when he was doing the glue up that the boards weren't flat...just forced together with the beadlocks.  Whatev.  He makes so much money from the tubes that he probably doesn't have to keep his customers happy (assuming this was a commission)

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Only thing is sometimes the customers wont pay to have it done right. At least up here. It makes it hard to make money and takes the fun out of it at times. 

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Damn I can't believe I've been doing it wrong all these years. Wasted all that time making sure boards were flat. What was I thinking. Thanks for setting me straight diresta. Where would we be without all these awesome YouTube woodworkers???

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A shop,  a video camera, some editing software and a YouTube account doesn't automatically mean the info is correct. If it sounds quick and easy be suspicious ! Maybe it just looks good at that camera angle ?

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That bead lock system looks painful for the table top. Unless it was a promotion, surely biscuits would have been quicker. 

 

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You guys are looking at this...

jimmy.thumb.jpg.ced98d6e008161e25cda8d927b4ae2d1.jpg

...and thinking he's a hack for not face jointing and planing the whole thing down to half an inch thick to deal with a slight bow in one of the boards.  I dare you to point out any twist in any of those boards that needs to be jointed out.  I would have done the same thing, minus not bothering with the beadlock stuff.

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I find his channel pretty interesting as he works in a lot of different mediums. Don't think he ever claimed to be a "fine" woodworker, but more of a practical one. The guy seems to be really creative.

he mentioned In a  previous video that he wanted to start a business selling farm house tables, so this one may have been a prototype or just a way to generate interest for people to buy his stuff.

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8 hours ago, krtwood said:

..and thinking he's a hack for not face jointing and planing the whole thing down to half an inch thick to deal with a slight bow in one of the boards.  I dare you to point out any twist in any of those boards that needs to be jointed out.  I would have done the same thing, minus not bothering with the beadlock stuff.

Na i think he's a hack because he's a hack

from left to right boards #2 and #6

It's not so much for me that the table is going to explode, it's more that the glue joints are going to be stressed from day one and might separate. How do you get a good edge when you have no reference surface? Wasn't there someone that just had this happen on here?

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Out here by me it looks like a table sold at the furniture stores. We have some big furniture store's out here it would take a hour to walk through and see everything. A very ordinary common house table.

I see nothing farmish about it.

Aj

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1 hour ago, Chestnut said:

Na i think he's a hack because he's a hack

from left to right boards #2 and #6

It's not so much for me that the table is going to explode, it's more that the glue joints are going to be stressed from day one and might separate. How do you get a good edge when you have no reference surface? Wasn't there someone that just had this happen on here?

I'm confused..Why is he a hack?

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I know this is a bit of a hijack, but I'd never heard of this beadlock system before.  It looks like a poor man's domino to me.  I can see that it isn't as efficient or quick, but otherwise seems like a reasonable loose tenon system, at a significant cost savings.  Am I missing something here?

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4 hours ago, Unknown craftsman said:

I see nothing farmish about it.

Aj

Maybe it is colloquial?? Farmhouse a la A White etc is used to denote built by a non artisan. Funtional...but “rustic.” 

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