Cygnus A

So is face jointing long boards not needed?

Recommended Posts

Again, jointing and planing don’t keep boards from warping, they remove warping, cupping and bowing that occurred while the board dried.  If the board hasn’t completely dried, jointing and planing won’t keep it from moving in the future. 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, Art said:

I know this is a bit of a hijack, but I'd never heard of this beadlock system before.  It looks like a poor man's domino to me.  I can see that it isn't as efficient or quick, but otherwise seems like a reasonable loose tenon system, at a significant cost savings.  Am I missing something here?

You nailed it - beadlock is not quick. 

Fast, good, cheap. Domino hits 2/3, Beadlock hits 2/3. Just not the same 2.

I think beadlock is not so popular because it has little advantage over a router cut mortise, and the routed mortise doesn't need special tenons.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I expand the range of tenons available for my Domino by making wider & longer ones than Festool sells.  Scrap, tablesaw, drum sander (maybe a planer could suffice) and the router table. Domino machines have 3 width settings but they only sell tenons to fit the smallest width.  When 2 dominos won't fit a part I use one of my  wider ones. 

The trick is when you set up cut a bunch of scrap sticks 18" -24" long . Then you can cut them to length as needed. 

I think someone sells a router bit to make your own beadlock tenon stock . I bet it's not easy to get set up just right.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, wtnhighlander said:

You nailed it - beadlock is not quick. 

Fast, good, cheap. Domino hits 2/3, Beadlock hits 2/3. Just not the same 2.

I think beadlock is not so popular because it has little advantage over a router cut mortise, and the routed mortise doesn't need special tenons.

It is also only marginally better than just going for regular dowels. In his use case, I think dowels, installed more quickly, should perform just as well. I imagine the glue joint without any connectors will be fine, and the dowels/biscuits/tenons are really only there to provide alignment assistance during glue up.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Watching guys like Diresta on youtube trying to get woodworking instruction is like watching a movie with a drunk lady making cookies. Sure, it's entertaining but you aren't going to learn how to make cookies. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
47 minutes ago, Llama said:

Watching guys like Diresta on youtube trying to get woodworking instruction is like watching a movie with a drunk lady making cookies. Sure, it's entertaining but you aren't going to learn how to make cookies. 

I don't know if i want to watch a guy run around a shop I'll just put a mirror up. At least i tell myself jokes his videos don't even have witty remarks.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Watched it again and still can't see the hack.. I make these tables at work. A little better than the video...

These are for Chilli's restaurant. One to two per store.....

I don't run the face on the jointer, but will run through the planer for a consistent thickness before glue up...

 

IMG_0246 (1).JPG

IMG_0248.JPG

IMG_0253.JPG

IMG_0243.JPG

IMG_0258.JPG

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Whenever I have to decide whether or not to joint something, my go-to indication is whether or not I can easily bend out a bow by hand.  I figure that if I'm strong enough to correct it without straining, then the glue should have no problem.  If, say, there is ⅛" of cupping over a 6' length, there's no point in losing thickness at the jointer.  In the picture from Diresta, however, I'd definitely have gone with different boards.  Those are way out of line.  But, as has been said, he doesn't claim to be a maker of fine furniture.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, Think0075 said:

Chestnut, thinks he is a superior craftsman because he face joints all his boards, cool...

I'm not a superior craftsman just a fellow hack. I don't facejoint all my lumber which is why i'm aware of the problems it causes. I don't think diresta tries on a lot of his projects. He just needs to get a youtube video out which is his job, a job he's doing well. I don't know why you guys get bent out of shape for me calling a duck a duck disagree with me cool that's what life is.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Just now, I B said:

Stop sucking because you can afford nice things. llama::

I really get it... It's like the Festool hate but turned up like 600 notches. :)

He joints his boards :o BURN HIM! LOL :angry:

I don't expect much more from these pages anymore. 

  • Haha 1
  • Sad 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wow! This got severely derailed and might call for some Mod PMs and cleaning up. Method can depend on tooling, but let’s call a jointer a jointer and not get hung up on Grizzly vs Hammer. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think this has gotten silly and it's time to lock this up.

Also not too sure the story behind a new profile that comes directly to this thread to start slinging even more mud than has already been slung.  Maybe my cynicism is getting the better of me...   

  • Thanks 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Anyone here regularly face joint 10" x 10 foot x 8/4 boards?  It's almost impossible to get them perfectly flat.  I tried it for my wife's desk, and I had to remove a lot of material.  When the boards are that long, The flex in across the entire board is quite a lot, to the point where sometimes bow can be there, or not, depending on what face is up and where the supports are.  For twist, jointing can help, but having it perfectly flat is not always necessary, especially if it has something like 1/4" twist across 10 feet.  That will never cause a glue up problem or snap back, unless it is 3" thick.

There's also the type of table the top goes on.  An apron like the one he has has a lot of support.  A trestle would have been a lot more important to maintain flatness.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.