thatCharlieDude

Hand Tools as Gifts for a Beginning Woodworker

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There are some good recommendations so far. I would also add into the mix either a digital volt/ohm meter or a hot wire detector. A lot of household projects seem to include its use for me. It doesn't need to be a Fluke but I wouldn't go harbor freight either.

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21 hours ago, wdwerker said:

My mom had a little tool set that hung on a molded plastic plaque in the kitchen. We could use them but she watched like a hawk . If one didn't get replaced there was hell to pay. 

 

My mom had something similar. I remember finding a jig saw in my shop years ago and she had written on it with a Sharpie, “ Stolen from .....”. Obviously I felt guilty enough to still remember that :mellow:

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On 1/6/2018 at 10:43 AM, wdwerker said:

Got to have a 8" Crescent wrench.  Vice-Grip pliers, needle nose pliers. For home/first apartment kits a 12' Stanley powerlock tape measure might be a better choice.  I think a 12 ounce hammer is more appropriate for a starter kit. 

I confused the wife with hand tools once last year. There's a Crescent-brand "channel lock" and a Channellock-brand "crescent" wrench in my box. Nuf said.

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On 1/7/2018 at 3:30 PM, Brendon_t said:

There are some good recommendations so far. I would also add into the mix either a digital volt/ohm meter or a hot wire detector. A lot of household projects seem to include its use for me. It doesn't need to be a Fluke but I wouldn't go harbor freight either.

+1. I even EDC a Fluke voltage detector/flashlight instead of just a flashlight.

F0336328-01.jpg.023bc8fc15e14db6123a2e10db5c941a.jpg

Nice toy!

 

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I second the putty knife and drill bit set. I feel like a lot of the stuff i did when i was younger involved making holes in drywall/plaster for hanging things, and then filling said holes. Goes without saying that you have duct tape on the list already, right? Wire nuts for 12 and 14 gauge are cheap and handy to have at the ready. Even if your kids dont intend to do electrical work, they can safely wirenut all stripped ends so no one gets accidentally buzzed. Really like headlamps, speaking of electrical work. I did my entire shop and other portions of the house, but i only work on dead lines. This is where the headlamp is your best friend. 

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3 hours ago, MattF said:

Add stud finder to the already healthy list you have received.

No! No stud finder, maybe a studless finder for the daughter? :D

Good idea, I think I'll send her my old one. 

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4 hours ago, Immortan D said:

+1. I even EDC a Fluke voltage detector/flashlight instead of just a flashlight.

F0336328-01.jpg.023bc8fc15e14db6123a2e10db5c941a.jpg

Nice toy!

 

Great idea! and I like that it's touchless. I need to order one of these for me. I had tons of multimeters and hot wire detectors but none of them are touchless. 

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2 hours ago, Pwk5017 said:

 This is where the headlamp is your best friend. 

Headlamp is good too. I'm not worried about duct tape she can buy her own. :) She liked to use up all my duct tape for art projects. 

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Forget all the other answers to which screw driver to get.

Get this one:

milwaukee-electrical-screwdrivers-nut-dr

 

https://www.homedepot.com/p/Milwaukee-10-in-1-Square-Drive-Ratcheting-Multi-Bit-Driver-48-22-2302/204069718

 

 

I've been using this at work for a couple months now, and absolutely love it.  I also tend to be picky about my drivers.  I usually hate all in ones, but this one rocks.   I had a couple things I wanted in it: 1) One piece, no chintzy caps or lids to lose.  2) Fast and easy driver switching, no loose bits to sort through,  3) Long driver bits that will nicely work in my impact driver.   and 4) Good solid handle for easy use.    I got the non ratcheting model, but I've debated if I should have, but for a simple homeowner toolbox, you cannot beat this one. 

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@Marmotjr I like the long bits on that driver.

Now of all the screwdrivers I have, this is the one I like the most:

61ojDgQQuxL._SL1237_.thumb.jpg.99c82250bb1c566422052a70aefbad71.jpg

Williams WRST1. It's very comfortable to use. There's a long shaft version available too, although I prefer long bits.

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Na your both wrong these are the best screwdrivers :P

21XNxi4oTjL.jpg

I really like the Klein screw drivers but most of the time the convenience of switching bits with 1 tool wins out. I like these over the milwalke one because switching from philips to flat is marginally faster.

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Milwaukee has done a good job of copying old standard tools, and offering improvements to the design.  There tin snips are a good example.  That Milwaukee 11 n 1 screwdriver is such a copy of the old standard Klein 11 in 1.

Here is my all time favorite utility knife:   https://www.lowes.com/pd/LENOX-3-Blade-Utility-Knife/999947664?cm_mmc=SCE_PLA-_-ToolsAndHardware-_-UtilityKnives-_-999947664:LENOX&CAWELAID=&kpid=999947664&CAGPSPN=pla&store_code=1141&k_clickID=02df4708-ce99-48db-9440-6b32fed694ed&gclid=Cj0KCQiA7dHSBRDEARIsAJhAHwgqb5qpXeiaNTPkGyCIw-WA4Om7ECOIbw9rWWqRAhI76kO3oGhfa88aAnDxEALw_wcB   

read the instructions on how to simply change blades.

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59 minutes ago, Tom King said:

Milwaukee has done a good job of copying old standard tools, and offering improvements to the design.  There tin snips are a good example.  That Milwaukee 11 n 1 screwdriver is such a copy of the old standard Klein 11 in 1.

Here is my all time favorite utility knife:   https://www.lowes.com/pd/LENOX-3-Blade-Utility-Knife/999947664?cm_mmc=SCE_PLA-_-ToolsAndHardware-_-UtilityKnives-_-999947664:LENOX&CAWELAID=&kpid=999947664&CAGPSPN=pla&store_code=1141&k_clickID=02df4708-ce99-48db-9440-6b32fed694ed&gclid=Cj0KCQiA7dHSBRDEARIsAJhAHwgqb5qpXeiaNTPkGyCIw-WA4Om7ECOIbw9rWWqRAhI76kO3oGhfa88aAnDxEALw_wcB   

read the instructions on how to simply change blades.

I have not seen the Milwaukee 11 in 1 screwdrivers, but may pick one up. I have 3 11 in 1 Kleins inside the house so the wife always has a screwdriver available. One of the best things I have done. She never needs to ask for a screwdriver from me, this only happened when I was in the middle of something.

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In the utility knives department, my favorite is this greenlee:

71W3HlJ2tbL._SX355_.jpg.1baa0754f7cb6732048b8c46b37b2b29.jpg

Has built-in storage for replacement blades and it's very easy to change blades.

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Same with the Lenox I posted the link to, but the Lenox also has the most comfortable handle of any I've ever used.   It's very easy to replace the blades, and there is plenty of storage in the clip inside the easy to open handle for extra blades.   It doesn't fold, but that's not something I ever needed in a utility knife.   I just said to read the instructions because it's not obivious how easy it is to change the blades.

They are hanging on a peg in Lowes, so it's easy to check out the handle shape.  You can't access the mechanism in the package though, but it's well designed.

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I like the Fat Max with a pivot screw. The pivot screw clamps the blade leaving less pressure on the locking slide mechanism. Easy to spin one handed. 

CB0A43D2-CCD8-491F-B600-E4EEBD899F7F.jpeg

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If you are givig them tools so they ahve them if they need them in the future - plenty of good advice above.

But if they have an interest in specific tools or in wood working, I would use this as an opportunity for some "together time" and take them shopping with you.

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