new2woodwrk

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Yeah!!! It’s a whole new world at my house. I have a barbers appt. tomorrow afternoon. Last cut was around January. Amazing how something taken for granted becomes so exciting. 

Along those same lines, anyone out there remember the Hong Kong flu in 1968? I certainly don’t, much less anything else that happened in the 60’s but I digress. Google it and you will be amazed. 

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8 hours ago, Coop said:

...much less anything else that happened in the 60’s but I digress.

As I was getting to know a guy I worked with, he was telling me about his career path and told me that he worked in the pharmaceutical industry for a while. When I asked him more about it he said, “uhhh, let’s call it... independent research. :lol:
 

Not sure if that’s what you meant by your comment, but it reminded me of the story. 

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@gee-dub, Are sealed bearings appropriate for such a high RPM application? I have read that there are issues with the rubber seals overheating, so shielded are a better for that. Not an expert at all, just curious.

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1 hour ago, drzaius said:

@gee-dub, Are sealed bearings appropriate for such a high RPM application? I have read that there are issues with the rubber seals overheating, so shielded are a better for that. Not an expert at all, just curious.

I had to do a little research on bearings as well.  I am sure there are many on here who know more than I learned with a little Googling and a call to VXB and another bearing outfit.  The bearing at the collet end that came out of the factory-original Colt was sealed and showed no signed of distortion.  Interesting in that most replacement bearings I see stated to be for the Bosch Colt were only shielded so you may be on to something there.  The smaller bearing at the top of the motor was shielded but, I used sealed there as well. 

Here's where it got fuzzy for me.  The speed rating on the larger bearing was only 15000 RPM, 31000 for the smaller one.  I was told that the speed and temp ratings along with the expected duty cycle all factor in to whether a certain bearing is appropriate for a certain use case.  If I were using the Colt in a CNC setup with those types of extended duty-cycles I would have been steered to a ceramic hybrid or full ceramic solution. 

The difference in price for a sealed versus full ceramic is about $5 compared to about $50 so your use case would have to qualify the price.  I volunteer to be the canary in a coal mine and test out the lower cost solution :D

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I talked to Laguna today about the advisability of hosing out the HEPA canister filter.  They strongly advised against it saying that the dust on the pleats turns to clay when the water hits it, and basically it will never come off.  Good to know, just in case the idea were to cross my mind again.  

By the way their recommended solution for cleaning the canister while still mounted is as follows.  Use compressed air, they said 40 PSI was enough, but I could go 60.  But while applying the compressed air hold a ROS with no sandpaper, just rubber pad, against the canister to vibrate it at the same time.  They say it works well.  Go figure.  I will give this a try when this project is over.  (I am pretty sure that vibrating the canister will shake it off the mount, so I'll put some block underneath to hold it up).  

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Yes even when I use compressed air it's usually max 90 psi. If you hold it far enough away at that pressure, the psi drops pretty quickly and you can cover a wider area. Just gotta be careful not to blow through the cleats. That's why they invented regulators I reckon.

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3 hours ago, Chip Sawdust said:

 Just gotta be careful not to blow through the cleats. 

And not blow through your skin, either. As little as 30 psi can inject an air bubble into you, if held close enough. Totally ruins your day...

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1 hour ago, wtnhighlander said:

And not blow through your skin, either. As little as 30 psi can inject an air bubble into you, if held close enough. Totally ruins your day...

I never knew this until recently my wife (ER doc) mentioned it recently as a not-so-uncommon injury. Also pressure washers can inject water under your skin.

I’m guilty of using both to clean off my hands/arms/legs after certain tasks and chores. Not anymore. 

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Nut, Buffalo board? Is that common in your neck of the woods? I’ve never heard of it, much less seen it down here. 

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8 hours ago, JohnG said:

I never knew this until recently my wife (ER doc) mentioned it recently as a not-so-uncommon injury. Also pressure washers can inject water under your skin.

I’m guilty of using both to clean off my hands/arms/legs after certain tasks and chores. Not anymore. 

So what happens? I’ll have to stop doing it. Maybe a little shop blower would work better. 

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4 hours ago, legenddc said:

So what happens? 

The heart doesn't pump air very well. It can be quite deadly. Compressed air "blow-off" nozzles now include a cross-bore hole that is supposed to relieve the pressure if you press the nozzle against your skin, but they aren't always in place.

As @Chip Sawdust said, keeping the nozzle away from the surface dissipates the pressure quickly, but accidental contact can really mess you up. A small leaf blower is much safer for dusting yourself off.

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5 minutes ago, wtnhighlander said:

The heart doesn't pump air very well. It can be quite deadly. Compressed air "blow-off" nozzles now include a cross-bore hole that is supposed to relieve the pressure if you press the nozzle against your skin, but they aren't always in place.

As @Chip Sawdust said, keeping the nozzle away from the surface dissipates the pressure quickly, but accidental contact can really mess you up. A small leaf blower is much safer for dusting yourself off.

I learned something new today guys thanks!

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Most air tools specify nominal pressure of 90psi which is why my regulator stays there unless I'm using my airbrush on a model airplane or car. Then it's down to 20psi max. You do have to be careful not to get air in your skin, but it's not too likely unless you already have a cut in your skin. Always be careful of anything under pressure though. Better safe than sick :)

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Talking about blowing stuff under your skin, I knew a painter with some very elaborate, multi-color, expensive tattoos on his arms.   He was spraying paint with an airless sprayer.  The hose developed a leak, and started shooting a stream of paint.  He put his finger over the hose until he could turn the sprayer off.  It injected paint under the skin on his arm.  They had to cut it open in the ER, to get the paint out, and never could get the tatoos to match back up.  This is a true story. 

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6 hours ago, legenddc said:

So what happens? I’ll have to stop doing it. Maybe a little shop blower would work better. 

As wtn mentioned you can get air bubbles in your blood stream. For the pressure washer, it can cause a small cut in your skin but then it spreads out and can split apart the and create pockets between the layers under your skin. It’s deceiving because it can look like only a small injury, but the damage can be a much larger area. If you’re spraying chemicals or using a high pressure paint gun, it can be really bad and they end up having to flay open your arm or whatever to clean it all out. 
 

edit: just saw Tom’s comment. Yeah that happens. My wife said that’s more common than the air compressor injury, at least around here. She’s seen similar cases and heard about even more from her colleagues. 

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On 5/15/2020 at 9:34 PM, Coop said:

Nut, Buffalo board? Is that common in your neck of the woods? I’ve never heard of it, much less seen it down here. 

I guess I've just heard that fiber board sheeting called that. So the term is common up here but i'd bet the product is around all over.

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1 minute ago, Chestnut said:

I guess I've just heard that fiber board sheeting called that. So the term is common up here but i'd bet the product is around all over.

It was really popular up here in the 80, 90's not used much anymore that I am aware of.

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It's been raining so hard and so long here that my two sump pumps are each triggering every 15 seconds.

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Coming thru the foundation walls? May be time to grade the dirt to slope away from the foundation. Im unlucky enough to have seepage straight up from the ground under my house, has a sump to get that out.

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I would have thought that would have been a given, grade away from the foundation? 

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Grade can change over time. Unless the slope was pretty severe to begin with, a couple decades worth of normal changes to the landscape can cause drainage problems to appear.

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