What did you do today?


new2woodwrk
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16 hours ago, Mark J said:

@Chestnut, what's the building in the background with the "steep stairs".  Reminds me of my old treehouse.

It's a free standing elevated play house. So a tree house with out the tree. He built it for his son when he was younger. Now i think the dad hangs out in it and drinks beer.

11 hours ago, wtnhighlander said:

I find that the coarse chips from a session of milling make pretty good ground cover. As fast as you work, you can probably generate enough to make a thick blanket by next week!

I do empty my DC up there but you'd be surprised at how slow it's taking me to cover the area. There is about 2,000 sq ft that I'm trying to cover and it'd be nice to have the dust 4" deep (fluffy). By my estimates that's 150 bins of dust (2000sf x (4"/12) x 7.48 / 35). At 30 bins a year it'll be a good 5 years before i get it covered. The dust is ok and I'll continue to cover it but  the larger chunks are nice and cover the ground a bit faster.

12 hours ago, Coop said:

Drew, on my last stickered stack of slabs I took a sheet of corrugated metal roofing and strapped it across the top and used small zip ties to attach black landscape fabric to the metal for sides which allows air circulation. 

I've thought about that as well. I want to do something to make the area look cleaner and not "junky". My neighbors right now abuse the corner of my property by blowing leaves and placing other debris on my property. I have a hard time asking them to stop when I'm not really maintaining the area myself. Once I get it cleaned up and looking nice I'll be a lot easier to make my case. I'm also tempted to put up a small section of chain link for the worst offender, which is a rental property. Either that or I'll send a letter to the property owner asking them to stop.

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On 6/30/2021 at 7:17 AM, Chestnut said:

do empty my DC up there but you'd be surprised at how slow it's taking me to cover the area. There is about 2,000 sq ft that I'm trying to cover and it'd be nice to have the dust 4" deep (fluffy). By my estimates that's 150 bins of dust (2000sf x (4"/12) x 7.48 / 35). At 30 bins a year it'll be a good 5 years before i get it covered. The dust is ok and I'll continue to cover it but  the larger chunks are nice and cover the ground a bit faster.

Maybe you should contact a local tree trimming company, you might be able to get them to drop of a load of chips for next to nothing after the days work.

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59 minutes ago, Chet said:

Maybe you should contact a local tree trimming company, you might be able to get them to drop of a load of chips for next to nothing after the days work.

Mulch is extremely cheap around here. I an get a trailer full for $35. It's more beneficial to get the clean screened stuff loaded on my trailer. Having to shovel it onto my trailer to move it to my back yard would be a pain. It's worth the $35 to have it loaded. This is a great idea though. I know a few tree service guys maybe I'll ask if they do stuff like this. My initial thought was they are selling the mulch. I know it has a lot of uses on construction sites etc. It's great for erosion and sediment control.

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There is a "shade tree" pallet construction business just down the road from my place,working out of an adandonded cotton gin building. They are happy to unload all the sawdust anyone might want. It is astounding how long that stuff takes to actually decmpose. Landscape mulch is generally  made from bark only.

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I did several things today. I started first by going to the gym and then after breakfast started reading some books pending to read. After reading, started my office work from home and then ate a delicious lunch after which took a nap of 1 hour and then again back to work. This is how my days goes by. 

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  • 2 weeks later...

Got home to a hissing sound. Went into my shop to find the water heater had burst and was draining water in my shop. Luckily the leak was slow.

0713211642-01.thumb.jpeg.5e358ccfb03e5351d7d35c7ea17ab132.jpeg

It did how ever get the ends of roughly 200 BF of maple and cherry wet. So i have to stack and sticker the wet ends to try and get it all to dry.

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This has turned my shop into a a complete mess and it's just stressful to go in there now...

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Did the blowoff valve fail? Those are recommended to be tested once a month. Not sure more than 1% ever does, but you have that picky kind of personality about some things so I thought I’d mention it. I take the time to pipe my blow off to my sump drain. Makes it less messy when I cycle mine seasonally. It may be too late for you D, but I take the time to type that to hopefully help someone else. 

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29 minutes ago, legenddc said:

Damn. Luck you caught it when you did.

Makes me want to finally splurge on a water sensor alarm and/or auto shutoff.

Flushing the tank and regularly replacing the anode rod would probably go as far. I don't trust electronics to last long enough to prevent this kind of thing honestly. I had half a mind to install a water heater pan that would catch the water and drop it directly into my floor drain. I had the PVC right there for my furnace drain already. I didn't have enough time to try and figure that our. Hind sight i should have taken the time. The pan would have made this a complete non issue.

For a water heater burst I think it'd be hard to miss it. Not getting hot water would be prime indicator #1 that something was wrong.

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Drew, after a similar mishap with a hot water heater, one, I raised it off of the floor as suggested by code and two, I placed a store bought pan below it. I tied the drain hole of the pan into the pop off line that included a check valve that won’t let water back into the pan if the pressure valve should release. Replacing hardwood flooring once was enough for me! 

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On 7/16/2021 at 7:01 PM, Chestnut said:

Bought this 2 months ago and just hung it up. Should have done this sooner.

 

I installed three of them years ago. I used 3/4" copper pipe to tie them all together and connected it to the air compressor with a short hose. It's great. Just reach over to the nearest reel and connect to my air tools. 

I did find that you will have to replace o-rings periodically. I found that the side load in the slip joint can cause them to leak a bit. I just run off the air feed at the compressor between times in the shop.

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