What did you do today?


new2woodwrk
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On 11/25/2021 at 5:52 AM, Tom King said:

I hope it will last until someone makes an EV one ton dually.

On 11/25/2021 at 6:49 AM, Coop said:

I thought you were going to say you hoped it lasts until they take your keys away! :D

Which ever comes first.

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On 11/26/2021 at 9:40 PM, wtnhighlander said:

None on the house, but one of my company's plants in Texas is building a farm. 

700 acres worth.

Effectiveness of the panels varies a good bit by location. 

If heat and humidity are parameters, it should do good! :D

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As far as earthworms are concerned, I regard them and honey bees and butterflies as my greatest asset to my garden. As of three months ago, I will no longer use my tiller on my garden beds as it shreds the worms. A little more back breaking work will be working the soil with a hand held pitch fork/hand held tool. 

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Raised beds are the way to go.  The soil stays in much better shape because the drainage is way better so the soil doesn't compact the same.  I still have to till it but I wouldn't call it back breaking at all.

I made the beds 18 inches high, the soil inside is about 14 inches deep.

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Probably depends on soil type but I've gone no till with my garden and haven't noticed any impact on production or plant size.

Ground was pretty firm this year and the tomato plants still managed to shoot out roots 7-8 feet  in all directions. My soil is quite sandy though.

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Probably helps that ground freeze breaks up the soil during the winter, too. In my area, heavy clay and mild winters make for very compacted soil. Most farms have to till at least every 3rd year or so.

I've noticed that they seem to go much shallower than in years past, though.

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7 hours ago, Chet said:

Raised beds are the way to go.  The soil stays in much better shape because the drainage is way better so the soil doesn't compact the same.  I still have to till it but I wouldn't call it back breaking at all.

I made the beds 18 inches high, the soil inside is about 14 inches deep.

Need to build some of these this winter in preparation for spring. Any tips that you or any of the other guys have for them? Did you raise them up on legs or just build them over the ground? What type of wood did you use?

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I made mine many years ago with landscape timbers, stacked 3 high. As these have needed replacing, I use 2x6 rough cedar boards. My 34’ x 14’ garden is enclosed by these. Starting on each end are 4’ x 14’ planting rows separated by 2’ walking paths, using 1x4 cedar boards. For my 3 tomato rows, I cover them in heavy black plastic film which is pulled tight over the soil and stapled to the boards that surround them. Then using a 10” pot lid as a pattern, I cut holes in the plastic with a box cutter. The holes are spaced 26” apart, starting 16” from each end and 14” from each side. This gives me room for 12 plants per row. Same place twice a year for 30 something years. The plastic usually last for two years before having to be replaced. 

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Ours are just treated 2x12's, with 2x4 stakes driven in the ground to screw them to.   Some people worry about using treated lumber, but what research I've seen says that nothing shows up in the plants.  Simple, and quick to make. Takes me about 20 minutes to make one, and not much more to fill it with the loader.  Most of the time is resting between swinging the sledgehammer driving the stakes.

Picture was soon after we enclosed it with the netting fence to keep deer out.

Pam has grown a Lot of stuff in those two beds.  I'm planning to build three more beside it, this Spring.  Posts for the fence are 10' steel T-posts, driven into the ground.  We cut some off of the length, but I forget how much.  If I could think of a way to easily get leaves off, I've cover over the top too, to keep birds out.

The beds are four feet wide, and thirty two feet long, so it took exactly nine 2x12's.  I cut them to length before we took them out of the back of the truck, and put them right in place.

574a0bd214b45_DSC_0001(1).JPG.895e8019f0486fa053e3d7105974dbae.JPG

 

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On 11/30/2021 at 9:33 AM, Mark J said:

Leaf blower from underneath?

Knowing how hard it is to get Oak leaves out of the larger mesh dog fences, I'm afraid that netting would be a nightmare.  They manage to get locked in there pretty good, and I have some blowers a lot stronger than I could use overhead.

Also, I'm working really hard at cutting down the to-do list.  I don't need something else to keep up.

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For the past couple of days, I've been cutting up firewood, and hauling stumps off the point, one at the time.  Just trying to get it done.  Can't find anyone with a dump truck, and loader who isn't already booked up through the Winter.  I probably have at least two more days of this.

 

IMG_3596.jpg

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