My first project


kat_7781
 Share

Recommended Posts

post-3662-0-87083700-1296438071_thumb.pn

First let me say I dont know the vocabulary for this kind of thing and any acurate words I do use(biscuit joint) is as result of a conversation with Rickey. If you have any questions about why I'm doing this check out my introduction post. Futher more (I'm a synic) there is always someone who wants to down and discourage stepping out of the box. Well I'm aware of just how far out I'm going and don't want to hear it. My Grandfather meant the world plus more to me and this is my tribute to him. I will learn how to do this step by step and if I mess up I'll find a new log and try again. I'm very persistent/dedicated. All encourgement and help is HIGHLY APPRECIATED.

Well here it is my first project. This is a VERY ROUGH drawing I did today of what I'm trying to build. I will go to walmart tomorrow for graph paper and a ruler/straight edge to make a better one. I'm just really exited about this. This is the link to the pic of table I want mine to look like. The end tables our of my own mind even tho I'm sure someone else has designed and built something just like it before, I've just never seen them.

http://www.diynetwor...able/index.html

It's GEORGOUS, I want one.

I have a black walnut log that is 12ish feet long and 3ish feet diamiter. My plan for the coffee table is to use a bicuit joint to join 2 center cut 4inch thick sections of the log together for the table top. For the end tables tops I'm going to use two 3inch sliced sections from the top of the stump. I'm going to turn the extra 6foot length of log into the legs for each table top. If you look at my rough drawing it is very apparent that I have no idea on how tall these tables should be. The link above also give instructions on how to make a plug for where you screw thur the table top to the legs. I don't have or know what attachement I need for the power drill to do that. I have also decided I would like other opinions on how to attach the leggs to the tops, as I'm not crazy about the idea of coring/drilling holes in my table tops.

Okay let it roll

Kat

Link to comment
Share on other sites

OK, enthusiasm is a good place to start. But some clarifications are in order before we can be of much use to you:

- Is the log already milled? Or is it still sitting there in one, gigantic trunk?

- How long ago was it milled/cut down?

This really changes everything, especially if the log is still wet. If you've got (or are about to cut or have cut) a 3" slab of green lumber, then settle in for a good long wait before it's ready to work.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It's a 12 foot long log just layin in a field cut from the stump. I will have to cut the log in half to fit on my little trailer. The stump has been torn out of the ground. I'm trying to find some where I can get it milled here in TN. I just started with the searches and yellow pages this morning no luck yet. I figured the mill could answer the questions about if and for how long it should sit/cure before I start trying to make a table out of it.

oh and it has been out in the elements down in the field for 2+ years

Very pretty work Ted. Iv'e seen some if it before but I'm not fond of the artistic form he uses for the legs for my own personal use. I have large dogs and hope to have children some day. I want it to be sturdy enought to handle the impromtu parents are out of town party where inevitably some teen with attempt to do a table dance on my hard work. That more than 10 years out but I'm just thniking ahead

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Okay I found a mill to cut my log. He informed me that the lumber would take YEARS to dry if just left to nature to do it for me. The gentleman I spoke with has the phone number, he will give me when I bring him the log, of a person who makes hard wood flooring and he has a kiln ?sp? that can dry wood faster than just putting it out to mother nature. One year for every inch thick is a guide he told me for mother nature. YIKES that's a long time, longer than I had even guessed. I was thinking months not years.

Opinions please. Assuming the kiln is large enough for my 4inch 3inch and 2inch thick pieces, which I am assuming it will be if he does pieces used for floors, is this a good method to use? Or am I better off letting nature do this job for me? Please help me understand the pros and cons of a kiln vs mother nature?

So here is what I have for the BASIC steps right now. 1 Make a final draft of my plans. 2 Take my log to the mill to be cut in the proportions I need for my plan. 3 wait for my wood to dry kiln or nature?

I'm not sure what to do from here honestly. I know I will need to get my lumber planed before I begin assembly but do I do that before or after it has been dryed?

I want to say thank you up front for the help I have already recieved and for in the future.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Sounds like you've got some waiting to do. That big a piece of wood will take a while to cure. Might I suggest that you do a few other things in the mean time. I know you aren't interested in me raining on your parade, and that isn't my intention, but why don't you do a few other projects so that you can get familiar with joinery, milling, finishing etc.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Sounds like you've got some waiting to do. That big a piece of wood will take a while to cure. Might I suggest that you do a few other things in the mean time. I know you aren't interested in me raining on your parade, and that isn't my intention, but why don't you do a few other projects so that you can get familiar with joinery, milling, finishing etc.

If it has that long to go I plan on it. I just cant think of anything else I'd like to build. I'm not to keen on like kids toys or bread boxes and nick nack type things. I do need a steamer chest and I've watched the videos on that one from this website. Any other suggestions?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Okay I found a mill to cut my log. He informed me that the lumber would take YEARS to dry if just left to nature to do it for me.

Correct.

he has a kiln ?sp? that can dry wood faster than just putting it out to mother nature.

Correct (spelling and information)

One year for every inch thick is a guide he told me for mother nature.

Correct.

YIKES that's a long time

Correct.

Please help me understand the pros and cons of a kiln vs mother nature?

Go for the kiln. The only real advantage to mother nature is that she's free. If the wood is dried too quickly in the kiln, it can cause problems, but I'd assume that whoever runs the kiln knows what to do.

So here is what I have for the BASIC steps right now.

  1. Make a final draft of my plans.
  2. Take my log to the mill to be cut in the proportions I need for my plan.
  3. wait for my wood to dry kiln or nature?

Sounds good to me!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Okay I found a mill to cut my log. He informed me that the lumber would take YEARS to dry if just left to nature to do it for me.

Correct.

he has a kiln ?sp? that can dry wood faster than just putting it out to mother nature.

Correct (spelling and information)

One year for every inch thick is a guide he told me for mother nature.

Correct.

YIKES that's a long time

Correct.

Please help me understand the pros and cons of a kiln vs mother nature?

Go for the kiln. The only real advantage to mother nature is that she's free. If the wood is dried too quickly in the kiln, it can cause problems, but I'd assume that whoever runs the kiln knows what to do.

So here is what I have for the BASIC steps right now.

  1. Make a final draft of my plans.
  2. Take my log to the mill to be cut in the proportions I need for my plan.
  3. wait for my wood to dry kiln or nature?

Sounds good to me!

Yeah I can feel my brain growing as I type, lol. All kidding aside thank you I appeciate finding out my minimal knowlege is correct. And when its wrong I like finding out so I de assimilate it. When my ADT instalation is done I'll go to wally world and get the graph paper so I can make a better and more acurate drawing for my plans.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

When you have the mill rough cut your log before drying, make sure that you are cutting it larger than your final dimensions. The wood may move (warp, cup, twist, etc) when it dries, so you'll need to trim off some to get nice square pieces. You'll also need to remove the rough sawn surfaces to get nice smooth wood. Maybe someone with more experience than I have can suggest how much larger you should be cutting your rough lumber.

Marc has got some videos on preparing rough stock. You might start with this one.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

When you have the mill rough cut your log before drying, make sure that you are cutting it larger than your final dimensions. The wood may move (warp, cup, twist, etc) when it dries, so you'll need to trim of some to get nice square pieces. You'll also need to remove the rough sawn surfaces to get nice smooth wood. Maybe someone with more experience than I have can suggest how much larger you should be cutting your rough lumber.

Marc has got some videos on preparing rough stick. You might start with this one.

Cool Thanks. I'm working on my final drawing tonight and this week. I'll have it done by Sat and the log goes to the mill next monday. I'm gonna post pics all the way thur this whole process.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

post-3662-0-49713800-1297113309_thumb.jppost-3662-0-93794300-1297113332_thumb.jppost-3662-0-33871900-1297113336_thumb.jppost-3662-0-41134300-1297113279_thumb.jp

Okay the log is now lumber and going to the kiln next monday.

After its dried I have to scrape of the rot on the edges then plane it down. Should I rough cut the pieces up for the legs before or after I have it dried?

What kind of buisness should I look for to plane a level top for me. This slab is to large for a small planer like you'd have at a home shop. The guy at the mill didn't know.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'd wait to do as much as you can after you have it dried.

So if you can wait to rough cut the legs then do so.

BTW, I've known lots of guys who've tried drying their wood at home in homemade kilns. All of them have fallening into three categories: Expensive, unsuccessful or slow.

Good luck, I like your project and I'm impressed with your gumption.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

If you can't find a cabinet shop in your area that will plane the surfaces for you, you might place an ad in Craigslist (or use the Services Needed category here).

I would try a few small pieces of furniture to sharpen your skills. Furniture like: patio bench, patio chair, foot stool, end tables, fire wood racks. Whatever gets you comfortable making long, straight cuts. Or in creating joints.

Have fun on this one, and keep those photos coming!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...

Well hit a snag. The guy that I thought would be able to dry my lumber never answered his phone. So Im still looking for a kiln to dry it. Finding one to do just an individuals small amount of lumber is not easy. I found one in PA but I cant go that far. So the hunt is on. I'm in Bethpage TN which is roughly 40 miles north of Nashville. If anyone knows of some where or some one that can kiln dry the wood for me I'd appreciate the info. So untill then It's covered and staying dry.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

  • Who's Online   2 Members, 0 Anonymous, 136 Guests (See full list)

  • Forum Statistics

    30k
    Total Topics
    407.6k
    Total Posts
  • Member Statistics

    22569
    Total Members
    3644
    Most Online
    VENBOR
    Newest Member
    VENBOR
    Joined