Coop

Rotating Equipment Stand

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I seem to remember someone on here mentioning a stand they had built that would hold more than one piece of equipment. Where you could rotate one piece out of the way while using the other. The two pieces I have in mind are both sanders, a belt/disc and an oscillating spindle. Anyone have any ideas? 

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This was a few years and a couple of machines ago, but I put a DeWalt 735 on one side of a flip top table and a Ridgid oscillating belt/spindle on the other, kind of hidden behind the SS in the picture.

I put a 1/4" dado down the middle of two pieces of 3/4 MDF, then glued them together so that a 1/2" steel tube with a 3/8" piece of all-thread could be placed through it. That was my pivot point that extended through the vertical uprights and were anchored in place.

 

IMG_0464.thumb.jpg.9159171b4eee850dc66e5c1fc7622a4e.jpg

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Mick, I was thinking it was either you or gee-dub. Do you remember if you posted pics? I kind of have a dilemma as my son gave me a PC belt/disc sander last year for Christmas and last month, after my old spindle sander went out, I bought the Ridgid combo. Really only need the Ridgid but wouldn’t dare part with his gift. 

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Oppps, the pic hadn’t shown when I asked the question. Do you recall if the difference in weight made it difficult to change location of the machines?

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Coop, the flip top should rotate with relative ease, if you center the weight of each tool over the pivot.

One disadvantage is that you can't use the built in storage slots of the Rigid, all the stuff will fall out when you flip it. And don't discount the usefulness of the belt/disk combo sander. I have the Rigid and still use my belt/disk combo quite a lot.

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So you’re saying that they shouldn’t be 180* from each other, due to the difference in weight. Yeah, I want it where both machines stay upright, regardless of their positions in the rotation. 

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You would need a planetary gear arrangement to keep them upright all the time, which would require more space.  Something like the Falkirk wheel.

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Coop, I know I've seen some magazine articles describing the same sort of thing.  Usually there's some sort of brace/stop to keep your choice on top.  Sorry I can't look around right now, but if I can lay my hands on it I'll let you know.

Dogged if I remember the name of the magazine... Wood something or something wood.  I know it had wood in the title :).

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Thanks Terry for sending me the article. And as @sjk mentioned, I don’t see these loose parts staying in their places too well as is. Perhaps I need to make a drawer or box to hold them. This is definitely a good start. 

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Coop, I hope what Terry sent you answers your questions.  I went through my saved magazines, but no joy.  

I could have sworn I'd seen an article, but I must not have saved it.  Strange when I look back and see what I did save.

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Thanks Mark, between Terry’s link and Mick’s info, I should have enough to go on/get myself in trouble:D. Thanks for the follow up. 

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I kinda did the same thing. I needed my Dewalt lunchbox planer to swing down so that it would roll under my outfeed table when not in use. I could make it so that another tool could be on the other side. Having only one tool it does require a little lifting to get it up into position, but not too bad.

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I just  quickly looked over those plans. Using eyebolts at the corners to lock the platform in place seems rather ingenious.

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Yeah that is pretty cool.  That's a good trick to remember even if I you don't build one of these carts. 

I think you would want to be careful that the eyebolt fits snuggly in the mortise.  Otherwise the top might be a little wobbly.  I haven't reviewed the plans, but I wonder if you could sandwich the eyebolt in the mortse between two fender washers.

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Here's another one if you guys need. This one you can keep flat on the wall and you pull out a shelf to spin it around. http://www.diytyler.com/2016/04/01/double-flip-top-workstation/

I think it would be cool to put one of these in the wing or outfeed table for a tablesaw. Flat on one side, planer or sander on the other.

 

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That's another clever approach.  I would screw that type of stand to the wall, pull 2 tools forward on the slides and the cabinet would tip over in a heartbeat.

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16 hours ago, wdwerker said:

I just  quickly looked over those plans. Using eyebolts at the corners to lock the platform in place seems rather ingenious.

Two of the plans I looked at used two thicknesses of 3/4 ply on the sides, I guess for rigidity. This guy uses only one and with the eyebolts on all four corners, I think one is enough?

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From the pictures the "fixthisbuildthat" guy uses 2 layers of 3/4 ply maybe with a spacer and the eyebolts. I don't think 1 layer of 3/4 ply would work well especially with the eye bolts and center pivot.

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1 hour ago, wdwerker said:

From the pictures the "fixthisbuildthat" guy uses 2 layers of 3/4 ply maybe with a spacer and the eyebolts. I don't think 1 layer of 3/4 ply would work well especially with the eye bolts and center pivot.

Steve, you're talking about the top right, not the sides? He uses two and the solid wood spacers for the top but only 1 for the sides.

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1 should be plenty for the sides . The pivot keeps the top edges from flexing too much and the bottom layers above & below the drawer add stiffness .  

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