MisterDrow

Milling wood for projects - always let it rest?

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2 hours ago, bleedinblue said:

He didn't stick around after that thread, Im not sure why! 

I've been trying to incorporate stickering into my work flow but it hasn't really happened yet.  I currently have several 5/4 project pieces freshly milled that I was going to sticker, but ran out of time so I just left them on the bench resting on their edges.  That's a typical scenario for me. 

I do typically mill to rough size then final size later, but I have never ever had any noticeable movement even without stickering.   I'm guessing it's one of the benefits of the basement shop, humidity level stays nearly constant practically year round. 

 

I would imagine resting them on their edges helps with airflow more than flat on a surface, though.

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39 minutes ago, MisterDrow said:

I would imagine resting them on their edges helps with airflow more than flat on a surface, though.

I do that often as well.  Stand on edge to keep them from laying flat on a surface.

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Am I the only nut job who covers the wood in plastic to prevent it from moving? I don't get all this stickering and stacking after milling. Everything I do, afterwards goes in a bag, or large stuff goes in painters plastic. 

-Ace-

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Ive seen the plastic thing before in magazines. Makes sense if you arent going to finish the joinery for weeks. Personally, i dont mill in 2+ stages for most of what i do. If i resaw a big piece, ill usually let it sit for a day before milling it flat, but just about everything else is milled in one shot. If your workpiece moves significantly overnight, it either wasnt dry on the inside, you didnt maintain equal airflow, or the board was wonky and always will be. For the most part, furniture parts arent large enough to move much and make a difference after the initial milling. This isnt always possible, but I will not start milling stock for a panel glue up unless i have time to glue that panel that day. This is especially true for table tops. I wont mill lumber for a table unless the base is mostly complete and im ready to take it out of the clamps and finish the project. 

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4 hours ago, bleedinblue said:

I was going to sticker, but ran out of time so I just left them on the bench resting on their edges

I use a cart similar to this  Rubbermaid Cart   with stickers ready to go and as I mill I stack the parts in the cart.  This way whenever I stop for the day most things are already stacked.  It also makes it easier to move parts around to different machines and keeps the work surfaces clear.

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After this latest project, where I had a key piece cup to be completely unusable - I'm now going to be in the over paranoid group of people. That piece of wood was in my shop for over a year and because I didn't take every possible precaution - I have been completely derailed. I've not been out to the shop in weeks because I know the first thing I gotta do is remake that piece and nail the joinery dead perfect so I don't have to remake the drawers (jewelry box.) I was so angry I wanted to quit for like a week or so. 

Long story short, I'll be milling in stages every time and sticker every piece no matter how far I am into the project. 

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Is milling too early a thing. I will be start a Ruobo soon and this will be my first time milling lumber in this quantity/size. My plan is to mill the boards for the top first and build that, then come back and do the base. I will be milling the boards to equal size trying to eliminate waste as much as possible. If I mill the top boards one weekend, can they sit until next weekend for the glue up? They will be stacked and stickered during the rest. Half of the lumber has been sitting in the shop for 9 months, the other half two weeks. All lumber was purchased locally and dry. I do not have a moisture meter, so I can not check moisture content. I should probably pick one up. 

 

I may be a little over concerned, but I would hate to mill these boards and they move on me and become unusable. 

 

I can try to swing a full weekend in the shop putting in long hours on both days to get the milling complete and glue done. Would this be a better option?

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On 2/7/2018 at 7:22 AM, MattF said:

They will be stacked and stickered during the rest.

This is the thing to do and they should be fine.

On 2/7/2018 at 7:22 AM, MattF said:

I can try to swing a full weekend in the shop putting in long hours

Almost everytime I think like this I end up making mistakes. :)  If you are capable of doing a long day mistake free, then that is an option.  For me if I have to push I loose the fun.

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I think I’ve learned the hard way that it’s nearly impossible to get two 3/4” boards by resawing a 1 3/4” board. No matter how close I get to my line, it’s not close enough. And then those suckers cup like a sob. 

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