sapling111276

What's your angle here anyway?!

Recommended Posts

Hi all. I am working on a newly made closet that I built in my daughter's room. The room has dormer/knee walls and this is what I built the closet into. That said, previous owners put flooring up on the ceiling and they did it in a way that everything is difficult to match new stuff up to. I am currently trying to put quarter round (3/4") against all ceiling portions of the inside of this closet. The ceiling pitch is 30 degrees. How can I make these corners match up? The upper corner will sit flat against the wall and ceiling, where as the section coming down will somehow need the inside 45 and 45 to make the 90, but then it has to angle downward to make the 30 degree dormer angle. I tried a few different compound cuts on my miter saw amd the closest i have come is to cut a scrap piece square for the upper ceiling portion and then taking a square piece on the 30 degree angle and slide it behind the upper piece and roughly sketching the rounded angle of the upper piece to the 30 degree piece. Then use a coping saw to hull out the meat that will make the corner joint. I have seen videos on this technique regarding crown moulding but I am struggling to find anything about multiple angles at 1 joint

Ps, if you have a good answer, can you reverse this scenario for the lower piece? My initial thought for the lower piece is to lop off the 30 degree angle from the upper back piece of the quarter round but that seems a little dangerous to run through my saw at 3/4"

I will take a picture when I get home to better show what I mean

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Perhaps I am not understanding the problem. Can't you just transfer the angle using a sliding bevel?

Regards from Perth

Derek

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Always , always , always buy too much quarter round ! It's not that expensive and it is deceptively easy to cut wrong. If it's bought at retail unused sticks can be returned.  I practice weird joints on scrap before I cut longer pieces.  Cope cutting inside corners is the correct way to do it, not mitering !

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I use a Stanley no. 30 angle divider, and then a sliding bevel to find the angle that's half of that, by setting it directly off the divider.  I bought mine new, and it's not framed like this one.  It seems like someone would be making them today, or you can probably get one off ebay.  Otherwise, it's just guess work.

https://www.chairish.com/product/667064/framed-antique-stanley-no-30-angle-divider

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think the other posters covered your cutting problems quite well.

If you should need to do anything to the existing ceiling, I think that is orange shellac, probably several coats of it. If put over new white pine, a coat of Minwax Puritan Pine stainapplied to the new white pine before the orange shellac will result in a very close match to the original color. My whole kitchen is orange shellac over white  pine, and this is how I have been able to match my major modifications to the existing cabinets and walls. 

Charley

 

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I agree with CharleyL on the finish. Play with a few scraps before you start staining & shellacking . Sometimes it only takes a light coat of stain. 

I think the wood on the ceiling is just T&G pine paneling. I wouldn't be surprised if the other face of those boards had a molding pattern . They made it like that so you could use it either way. 

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Minwax Puritan Pine can be lightened by mixing with Natural, or darkened by mixing Early American.  Let your samples dry before deciding on the mix combination.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Interestingly enough I literally just bought some orange shellac today about an hour before reading some of the tips you guys gave me. Thanks again on that. I will include a picture of the opposite dilemma. To me, it looks like trying to match up quarter round at odd angles presents a bit of a problem. The thing about what is in the picture is that I haven't even ripped off the 30 degree angle to accommodate the ceiling pitch and already (to someone inexperienced as I am) it appears there just isn't enough quarter round to achieve the matching angles. I will definitely have to find that trim book. I'm very limited on my tricks for that stuff. In a previous room (similar project) I made a corner block and cut 45 degree chamfers on the lower half to make them less obtrusive. That made making my trim work super easy. I have been messing with wood working for a little over a year now and I guess my inner monologue keeps jabbing me for now figuring this out by now. 

20180218_164209.jpg

1518990744520619358355.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Your solution is a good one.

 

The only way to solve that problem, without the transition piece, is to make one piece that matches the other.  Usually, the piece on the angle is custom made to mate to the horizontal one.

DSCN8798.JPG

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'd be surprised if a Carpentry Trim Book would have a how-to on raking cyma.   Funny, I just did a google search for raking cyma, and that picture off of my website was one of the first images.

Here's one:

Image result for raking cyma

  • Thanks 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 2/13/2018 at 2:17 PM, wdwerker said:

I agree with CharleyL on the finish. Play with a few scraps before you start staining & shellacking . Sometimes it only takes a light coat of stain. 

I think the wood on the ceiling is just T&G pine paneling. I wouldn't be surprised if the other face of those boards had a molding pattern . They made it like that so you could use it either way. 

I cut a section out to replace. Oddly enough, there was an old decommissioned chimney in the wall and as it approached the roof line, it slowly transitioned over about 6 inches or so and the person who put the wood up, made a box-in to hide this. Your 100% correct. I flipped the board over and there is a bead going down the middle. This guy absolutely loved this stuff. My bedroom walls are this material, as well as a door he fashioned out of that wood for the basement. Oh and the previous noted project room I worked on. The ceiling is identical. It's an old farm house, so I suppose in a way it adds to that appeal. Sure as heck beats the plaster and lath that it's hiding.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

How is that chimney supported underneath?  I have found them only resting on the ceiling joists, which had of course, sagged a lot.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The chimney was about 5 feet tall and I was baffled because it was propped up on some real 2x4s and a few pieces of tongue and groove pine as the bottom. What really got me wondering was, there was no opening to tie into the chimney. I ended up tearing most of it out. Some ended up in the cavity to cut down on how much waste I lugged down the stairs :D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now