TerryMcK

Sketchup 2018

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Looks like the pro version is the only one available now. I don't really want to use the free version that is web browser only :(

I have invested a lot of time creating models in Sketchup 2017 (and older) and don't fancy having to pay the exorbitant prices that Trimble are now charging. I am a one man hobby woodshop not some big corporation. Looks as though I will have to stay with Sketchup Make 2017 for now until they start restricting access to the model warehouse too.

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49 minutes ago, TerryMcK said:

Looks like the pro version is the only one available now. I don't really want to use the free version that is web browser only :(

I have invested a lot of time creating models in Sketchup 2017 (and older) and don't fancy having to pay the exorbitant prices that Trimble are now charging. I am a one man hobby woodshop not some big corporation. Looks as though I will have to stay with Sketchup Make 2017 for now until they start restricting access to the model warehouse too.

It's only a matter of time. I have no idea why trimble owns this software. They have huge amounts of geo-locating products and then modeling software. If they follow the mold of their survey equipment Sketchup is going to get really really expensive.

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13 minutes ago, Chestnut said:

I have no idea why trimble owns this software.

 

From an article published when Google sold off SU to Trimble in 2012...looks like they're interested in the construction trades, not necessarily woodworker/makers (and definitely not hobbyists ... )

"Trimble seeks to be a leader in Building Information Modeling (BIM). Most BIM software companies approach the market from the architecture side, but Trimble is assembling its BIM portfolio focusing on construction. Trimble says its BIM focus “is on the deployment of integrated solutions for the contracting community, with enhanced use further in the construction process including BIM to Field.” It further defines BIM to Field as “extending the design data created in the office down to field level systems for precise delivery of design and construction elements.” Trimble will likely use SketchUp to tie together the various loose ends that have come with acquiring so many products so quickly."

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1 minute ago, Jfitz said:

 

 

From an article published when Google sold off SU to Trimble in 2012...looks like they're interested in the construction trades, not necessarily woodworker/makers (and definitely not hobbyists ... )

"Trimble seeks to be a leader in Building Information Modeling (BIM). Most BIM software companies approach the market from the architecture side, but Trimble is assembling its BIM portfolio focusing on construction. Trimble says its BIM focus “is on the deployment of integrated solutions for the contracting community, with enhanced use further in the construction process including BIM to Field.” It further defines BIM to Field as “extending the design data created in the office down to field level systems for precise delivery of design and construction elements.” Trimble will likely use SketchUp to tie together the various loose ends that have come with acquiring so many products so quickly."

The biggest market I've seen this for is architects. But there isn't any way that I've seen to do any sort of accurate spatial positioning within sketchup (It doesn't have coordinate systems). Where as programs like Revit and Infraworks do a lot of the stuff sketchup does but adds in spatial features so you can import and export survey data. Then again it's comparing a pet project that google threw together to some of the best that Autodesk has put out, not really fair. Again it doesn't make sense for a company that is Huge in surveying to have bought a program that does nothing with survey.  Maybe they plan to tie it with some of their other software?

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24 minutes ago, Chestnut said:

Maybe they plan to tie it with some of their other software?

Agreed.  Seems odd.  FWIW, SU is not something that Google threw together - they bought it in 2006.

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6 minutes ago, Jfitz said:

Agreed.  Seems odd.  FWIW, SU is not something that Google threw together - they bought it in 2006.

Ah yes i forgot that but google did a lot to increase the functionality of it after they acquired it.

Also in my research it should be noted that google sold the software, and it appears that they retained control of the 3d warehouse, just guessing but i think the 3d warehouse is part of what they use to give google maps 3d buildings?

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23 minutes ago, Chestnut said:

i think the 3d warehouse is part of what they use to give google maps 3d buildings?

I think so.  Appears that's what caught their interest, originally - SU had integrated with Google Maps.  Maybe that fit into their view of a 'social' online experience.  I don't think it every really took off though, and SU seemed mostly to be used to create objects....not "social environments" (like recreations of cities/towns/famous places).

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In my experience, architects use sketch up for rough spatial modeling. Revit and autocad are used for making construction documents, but are slow for mass modeling. Revit in particular is not geared for open ended generic abstract models. Everything is built with parametric model components that represent real things like steel beams, concrete slabs, etc. and it generally wants to function on grids and levels. 

I also noticed this change in sketchup and was not thrilled. A few years ago, google had Picassa, a free photo editing and organizing program, that they abandoned. So sad, I loved it.

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7 hours ago, Isaac said:

In my experience, architects use sketch up for rough spatial modeling. Revit and autocad are used for making construction documents, but are slow for mass modeling. Revit in particular is not geared for open ended generic abstract models. Everything is built with parametric model components that represent real things like steel beams, concrete slabs, etc. and it generally wants to function on grids and levels. 

I also noticed this change in sketchup and was not thrilled. A few years ago, google had Picassa, a free photo editing and organizing program, that they abandoned. So sad, I loved it.

I haven't used revit a lot but i didn't really think it was slow. I personally find sketchup to be a bit slow. I don't really like how everything turns into 1 big blob.

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8 minutes ago, Chestnut said:

I haven't used revit a lot but i didn't really think it was slow. I personally find sketchup to be a bit slow. I don't really like how everything turns into 1 big blob.

With Sketchup, I constantly turn objects into groups or components the moment I create them, to avoid that issue, which I agree, is frustrating if you don't keep a handle on it.

Revit just isn't made for furniture making, it is designed specifically for making buildings (it is BIM - building information modelling). The primary drawing tools are beams, floor slabs, footings, ductwork, etc. not lines, rectangles, etc. I've used it quite a bit and I couldn't imagine designing furniture in it, I'm not really sure how I would do it. There is probably some way, but it really isn't what it is made for.

Autodesk has another product, Inventor, that they market for woodworking, but I've never tried it. It competes with Solidworks.

 

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57 minutes ago, Isaac said:

With Sketchup, I constantly turn objects into groups or components the moment I create them, to avoid that issue, which I agree, is frustrating if you don't keep a handle on it.

Revit just isn't made for furniture making, it is designed specifically for making buildings (it is BIM - building information modelling). The primary drawing tools are beams, floor slabs, footings, ductwork, etc. not lines, rectangles, etc. I've used it quite a bit and I couldn't imagine designing furniture in it, I'm not really sure how I would do it. There is probably some way, but it really isn't what it is made for.

Autodesk has another product, Inventor, that they market for woodworking, but I've never tried it. It competes with Solidworks.

 

Oh i know revit isn't for woodworking. That was kind of brought up as an example of software that works better for BIM than sketchup. The little bit that I've used revit was for water treatment plants and waste water treatment facilities where exact locations of pumps and pipes is crucial. Revit combined with infraworks makes for some really interesting possibilities. My old company created a full 3D model of a downtown area including the underground utilities. You could zoom around like you were in google maps and then swing the camera underground and all the utilities would pop up.

I've fiddled with Fusion 360, ACAD, sketchup, and i keep going back to ACAD it's just so much easier. Though Fusion 360 is basically the same thing i don't like the only cloud based operation. It's nice to be able to mess around on a laptop when your bored and without internet.

Some day when i get time I'll do trials of PTC Creo and/or solid works. I've always wanted to give them a shot but never have the time.

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In the early 2000s I used Inventor (v5 and 8) and Acad (v2000i) pretty extensively in school, then Revit and Acad 2005-2008 for work in HVAC design. 

I was never a fan of Revit, even for building systems, but wasn’t given any training and was expected to do the work in both Acad and Revit and still meet the original deadlines.

I’m pretty new to woodworking, and so far have been using Sketchup for my projects. When I first started using it, I found myself longing for the features and control of Inventor, but somehow didn’t think of digging up my old copy of Inventor that autodesk gave me.

I still use my copy of Acad 2000i to do quick drawings to work out joinery dimensions or proportions. 

I’m in the process of trying out Fusion360, but might also install Inventor and give that another go. 

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There are 2 SketchUps available -- the Pro version is the one that you found, and the free one uses a web interface.

There is also one that you can download -- and it is called Sketchup Make … that is the one that is free and is downloaded on your computer.

 

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I just ran across a (still free) alternative, called DesignSpark Mechanical. I think you have to sign up for an account to use it, but it runs locally, not in a browser. A bit of a cross between Inventor and Sketchup, it appears. I'll post some feedback once I've had a chance to try it out myself.

Unfortunately, it is a Windows only application, and I am a Linux guy....

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Late to the party here. There are currently four versions of SketchUp available, two of them are "free for personal use". SketchUp Make, the previous "free" version is no longer being updated annually with SketchUp Pro. But the last iteration "SketchUp Make 2017" is still available for download, and according to the folks at SketchUp it will continue to be available in the future. The link is a little hard to find, but it is here: https://www.sketchup.com/download/all

The new web-based version is "SketchUp Free". I'm not a big fan of web-based software, but "Free" works pretty well, and is improving on a regular basis.

SketchUp Pro has all the bells and whistles; solid tools that let you make one part of a joint from an existing part with a couple of clicks, and an additional program called "LayOut" that makes printing easier in general and gives the ability to create professional looking prints. You can also import and export vector graphics files from SketchUp Pro. To get SketchUp Pro you pay an initial license fee (currently $695). There is an annual fee (currently about $120) that keeps you up to date and access to support.

A couple of weeks ago, "SketchUp Shop" was announced. It is the web-based software with several of the Pro features included. It costs $120/year for a subscription.

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