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s1nglemalt

Lifting gear and slabs to above-garage shop

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There will be a 2nd story shop above a working two-car garage. I do not want to build a complex in-shop hoist system. I am looking for ideas that will get tools and slabs externally (outside) to a dormer that will be around 8' or 9' above ground level. Dormer will be at least 6' wide to allow big things to get in. How do I get them up? I am suburbia so I cannot justify a forklift or other cool ideas. Mobile mast system? Mobile boom? Got economical and not super sketchy ideas? 

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Yea, I think that any idea you come up with that doesn't involve renting a lift of some sort is going to be dicey at best.

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I don't even know why I'm responding because I'm just taking a wild guess.

Here my best guess. A rope and wheel - we use them for moving stuff up and off roofs. We even moved large emglo compressors off roofs.

The set up looks like this obviously it will take two people.

Aj

image.jpeg

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I've seen barns with the ridge of the roof sticks out several feet. Then pulleys and rope pull up heavy stuff to an upper door...

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23 minutes ago, curlyoak said:

I've seen barns with the ridge of the roof sticks out several feet

This was my first thought too. An adequately sized I beam and electric hoist.

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Google search. Barn hoist.

 

There are a bunch of options both manual and electric. This kind of thing has been done for hundreds of years but it will cost you. Especially if you need to modify your building after it's built.

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Wild idea. a 4 post car lift that's on casters. What could possibly go wrong?

I think renting a lift for the initial setup would be smart and then use pullys for stuff after. If it's only 8' up make sure you can slide heavy lumber strait in.

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3 hours ago, curlyoak said:

I've seen barns with the ridge of the roof sticks out several feet. Then pulleys and rope pull up heavy stuff to an upper door...

Look for an electric hoist big enough to lift the heavy shop equipment you will inevitably buy/sell and not just lumber.  

The hoist is then mounted on a wheeled carriage to a rail or I-beam so that the load can be moved into and out of the shop through doors on the dormer.

The whole thing, hoist, rail, and rigging needs to be sized appropriately.

Personally if I were building the garage I would thoroghly investigate the idea of an inside elevator.

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Once the equipment is up there, getting materials up won't need nearly as much lifting power.  I'd rent something for the tools, and then a smaller permanent solution for materials.

I rebuilt a 43 foot tall chimney out of old bricks.  The bricks were selected,  with some having to be cut, and positioned for each course.  I made a box that allowed us to size each course.  The courses were first stacked on the ground, and then we hoisted them up one course at a time in the box.   Each course probably weighed a hundred pounds.  We used a 6 to 1 sailboat mainsheet system of blocks, with a long climbing rope.  The box was hoisted up by hand, an restacked up on the scaffolding in preparation to lay the bricks. An electric hoist would have been nice, but since this was a one time job, I just used what I had.

In this picture, this chimney was rebuilt from the middle of the second story windows (fortunately, there was an intact one on the other end of the house that I could copy):

DSCN8654.JPG

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Yeah, sub 200 lbs and 400 lbs plus are two very different animals. Job site tools are frequently hoisted on swing arm pulleys that mount in scaffolding. But if you don’t do scaffolding a lot, there is a learning curve. If you have big tools, I think you are stuck with a lift. Slabs and small items can  be figured with ease. Tools are the catch if you have any large machines. 

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1 hour ago, Mark J said:

Personally if I were building the garage I would thoroghly investigate the idea of an inside elevator.

One of the guys near my parents house did this in their garage. They built a huge car dealership empire in the Midwest and built a 2 story garage with a car elevator to move cars around...... All the cars are restored or custom cars from the 40s 50s and 60s. I wish smart phones existed when they gave me a tour but this was before 2006 so i didn't even have a cell phone.

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I enjoyed the discussion!

By the way, I almost always like Tom's advice, but don't use a "climbing rope" - they are designed to stretch under load and to be disposed of after a certain number of "loads" - typically 7-9 leader falls.

Something like "gold line" or any basic utility rope will be better.

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1 hour ago, Pondhockey said:

I enjoyed the discussion!

By the way, I almost always like Tom's advice, but don't use a "climbing rope" - they are designed to stretch under load and to be disposed of after a certain number of "loads" - typically 7-9 leader falls.

Something like "gold line" or any basic utility rope will be better.

Sorry, I was thinking tree climbing, and not rock climbing.   Should have said Bull Rope, but thought many wouldn't understand the terminology.   Actually, it was 5/8" Stablebraid, so probably ;) strong enough, and definitely wouldn't stretch.

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10 hours ago, Larry Moore said:

I've seen barns with the ridge of the roof sticks out several feet

My first thought as well.  Would be a project unot itself.  The trick is making sure that the roof structure can take the load.  Remember that the ones you see on barns were, I believe mostly for hay and not for heavy equipment. good luck.

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Opening in the floor with a electric hoist would be my choice. You could open the door in the floor and pass longer lumber up that way. Only use the hoist for machines and other heavy stuff.

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3 hours ago, Tom King said:

Sorry, I was thinking tree climbing, and not rock climbing.   Should have said Bull Rope, but thought many wouldn't understand the terminology.   Actually, it was 5/8" Stablebraid, so probably ;) strong enough, and definitely wouldn't stretch.

OK, I was sloppy, too (blush). 

There are, in fact, "static" climbing ropes like the gold line I referred to; it is specifically the "dynamic" ropes - typically kernmantle that would be innapropriate for hauling heavy loads. 

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Well, the OP isn't chiming in with clarifications or comments, so I will.

Maybe I misread the post, but I interpreted it to mean he (she?) was moving to a place configured as described, not building it. 

If I were building such a space, I would seriously consider some sort of jack / lift / hoist system INSIDE the building, through a trap door between the lower garage and upstairs shop. Might kill 2 birds and install a car lift downstairs with a little extra range ...

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My brother, anticipating recent back surgery and being the lazy sort that he is, built a lift system using HF sourced materials and welded a “basket system” to get crap into his shop attic. I’ve requested a video of it and will post as soon as I receive it. Even if op has vanished, it may help others. 

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5 hours ago, wdwerker said:

Opening in the floor with a electric hoist would be my choice. You could open the door in the floor and pass longer lumber up that way. Only use the hoist for machines and other heavy stuff.

That's what I meant by "elevator".

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Thanks for your input, and allow me to clarify a bit more. I want the ground floor to be two cars in the two-car garage. This probably means nothing internal from below, but that is a great idea. The current footprint is 23' x 23', and I cannot expand easily. A "regular" architect gets very wary about barn hoists, and quickly reverts back to something such as, "I am going to need a structural engineer and s/he will need to come with me to the county". Something like a material lift on CL is a great call - portable and requires no thought from an architect. The upstairs shop will have a full bath and can be staged as a studio apartment. It will be a typical shop, though, for woodworking. I will have many more questions as this project comes alive for ventilation and ductwork. 

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