Chisel Sharpening


jmw
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I am trying to sharpen some Craftsman chisels.  I am using the DMT W250CXNB 10-Inch DuoSharp Bench Stone Coarse / Extra-Coarse diamond plate to flatten the back of the chisel.  I have already spent hours trying to flatten the back of a 1 1/4" chisel (my last one to sharpen).  The chisels are made of carbon steel and are these chisels: https://www.shopyourway.com/craftsman-6-pc-wood-chisel-set-with-case/289362.  My DMT plate is relatively new, but it is taking so long to knock down even 3/4" back from the blade.  Any one have an suggestions to speed this process up?

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The steel on those chisels should be easy to cut away. Make sure your Dmt is flat and sitting on a very ridged flat surface. Since they are plastic they will bend.

I also like James idea so you don't ruin the Dmt. Those diamonds will lose their sharpness pretty quickly.

I haven't  had to dress the back of a chisel or a plane blade in a while but here's the method I use.I really try to focus pressure out on the edge.

image.jpeg

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2 minutes ago, jmw said:

Is sandpaper the best option to get that lower grit?  I tried some sand paper but it seems to wear out so quickly and i'm not really sure if I am helping the process or not.

It wears out pretty quick but it removes the steel in a hurry. I start at 80, go to 120, then 220, then to my waterstones. 

And wearing out sandpaper is better than wearing out your diamond plate.

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One has to be careful when "not flattening the whole back" If only the last 3/4" or so is ground flat, there can be issues with registering the the chisel flat to the work surface. When I flatten a chisel, the entire blade is on the stone, with most of the downward force concentrated towards the business end. Once the 1" or so at the end is flat I call it good. But by engaging the stone to the entire blade the whole chisel back is essentially coplanar, even if there are un-flat areas back from the edge. 

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I don't think the op should start at 80 that's just too aggressive the scratches will be hard to remove. The 220 wet dry stuff they sell at pep boys will cut plenty fast. The key is a flat hard surface that will not bend or warp when push down hard. And clean your paper a lot. the metal your cutting away will roll around between the blade and paper and give you false reading.Keep it flat band clean.

Aj

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But cheap chisels that are badly out of flat will need the coarse grit or he'll be at it for a month. But mostly, 80 grit would be way too coarse. I have a 600 grit water stone that I usually start with, or if it's really bad, a 120x DiaFlat plate. That thing cuts like crazy.

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Have you checked out any youtubes on prepping chisels & plane irons? There are lots of very good ones. The Wood Whisperer has at least one, Lie Nielsen, Paul Sellars, the list goes one. Watch a bunch till you find a method that works for you. Sharpening was something that I struggled (& sometimes still do) a lot with & videos sure helped a lot.

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For really coarse stock removal like that, go to the nearest Harbor Freight and grab this set:

https://m.harborfreight.com/3-piece-2-inch-x-6-inch-diamond-hone-blocks-36799.html?utm_referrer=direct%2Fnot provided

Abuse them as needed, toss when (if) they wear out. They are a bit small for honing the bevel with a guide, but fine for the back. They actually work pretty well, but 'fine' is only 360 grit.

I don't recommend the 4-sided diamond block they sell, the plastic block falls apart easily.

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