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thewoodwhisperer

DSLR vs Camcorder

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I am currently in the process of switching from a dedicated prosumer video camera to a DSLR. I think it's time and the tech has finally gotten to the point where I feel like this move won't be a huge inconvenience. I'm curious what you guys shoot with. 

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Compared to guys like you, I shoot with a camera obscura. :D

Currently using my LG-V10 android phone's 5k camera, and occasionally a Sony Actioncam.

For a while, I used a borrowed Panasonic 4k video camera. Having a real lens was nice, but shooting everything at 4k really ate up storage. 

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You know, everyone is walking around with a more powerful/higher resolution camera in their pockets that the kind of camera I started with. It's amazing how quickly that tech advanced. If you can get decent audio, there's nothing wrong with capturing on a phone.

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Curious what camera you're considering Marc?  I'm currently using a Cannon T6 and when the autofocus works right, I like it. ;)

In all honesty, I need to learn to operate the one I have before considering an upgrade.  Maybe for about the same price, I could just hire someone who really knows what they're doing to do the filming and editing for me ;)

 

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Marc I use a Canon 5D Mark III, it is an absolute joy to use.  The new Mark IV is the latest model.  The video is spectacular.  I often wonder when watching your Friday live shows why you don’t use a remote pan/tilt head to move camera around the shop. Consider the CamRanger PT Hub, great addition to the dslr.  Couple it with the CamRanger and you can control all your camera functions through your smartphone.

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I started shooting with a Canon 7D. Video was all manual then but there have been leaps and bounds for Autofocus in new DSLRs. These days I'm using a Canon 6D which is limited on the video side but great for stills. I don't shoot video much unless it's on my iPhone.

One thing to remember with DLSR: The investment is in the lenses. I use low aperture prime lenses and love the effects you can get with them. Quality lenses will last but the bodies are upgraded every couple of years.

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I just switched to a micro four thirds Panasonic G85 from a Nikon APS-C.   The biggest thing I like about it is the touch screen AF.  The camera is in MF but you can still just touch the AF area on the screen and drag it where you want it and it will AF for you and then go back to MF.  That is just the best thing ever.  The kit lens is also really good.  The variable aperture isn't so great but the sharpness is just as good as the $1000 Leica lens of the same range.

On the downside it has the worst buttons of any camera I have ever owned.  They just have almost no feedback whether you pressed them or not.  They saved the absolute worst button for the record button, which they decided to make perfectly flush with the body.  I ended up gluing a little doohickey on it so I could actually find the thing. 

 

It also goes into this mode in between being fully on and sleep mode.  When it's in that half asleep mode it take a button press to wake it back up and it ignores that button press.  So several times I have hit record and it didn't record and I lost footage.  The indicators on the lcd that it's recording aren't that pronounced.  Like an icon that has red in it when it's not recording turns into a different icon that has red in it, along with a flashing red dot on the opposite side.  But I'm getting used to it.  I wish there was just something on the touch screen that would act as that button instead.  Another downside is that because it's so small I can't get the battery door open while it's on the tripod.  I wouldn't have to take the QR plate off, just slide it out.  But the battery life is not great and that's annoying to have to do so I bought a third party portrait grip so the battery now slides in from the side into the grip.  Also it has an additional crop in 4k mode that makes the kit lens not quite as wide as I would like.

All in all I think it's the best value 4k camera in that for $1000 you are good to go besides getting at least another battery.  For someone who is doing it as their job like Marc they would want to step up to the GH5 and a constant aperture lens.  Can't speak to the buttons on it but I think it resolves my other issues with the G85.  I think Marc would be better off in micro four thirds land coming from a camcorder as the sensor size change is not as dramatic as going to APS.  Doing more of the instructional content as opposed to artsy stuff you don't generally want shallow DOF and any close up shot at all on APS is a challenge to get very much in focus unless you've got your shop lit up like the sun.

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12 hours ago, ..Kev said:

Curious what camera you're considering Marc?  I'm currently using a Cannon T6 and when the autofocus works right, I like it. ;)

In all honesty, I need to learn to operate the one I have before considering an upgrade.  Maybe for about the same price, I could just hire someone who really knows what they're doing to do the filming and editing for me ;)

 

I currently use the Canon 80d. I actually bought it for the sake of taking good photos for the book, but it also seemed like one of the best all around cameras for video work. The autofocus is great and looks like it's actually better than the Sony Z150 camcorder I've been using. It's more stable and doesn't hunt for focus like the Sony. 

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7 hours ago, krtwood said:

I just switched to a micro four thirds Panasonic G85 from a Nikon APS-C.   The biggest thing I like about it is the touch screen AF.  The camera is in MF but you can still just touch the AF area on the screen and drag it where you want it and it will AF for you and then go back to MF.  That is just the best thing ever.  The kit lens is also really good.  The variable aperture isn't so great but the sharpness is just as good as the $1000 Leica lens of the same range.

On the downside it has the worst buttons of any camera I have ever owned.  They just have almost no feedback whether you pressed them or not.  They saved the absolute worst button for the record button, which they decided to make perfectly flush with the body.  I ended up gluing a little doohickey on it so I could actually find the thing. 

It also goes into this mode in between being fully on and sleep mode.  When it's in that half asleep mode it take a button press to wake it back up and it ignores that button press.  So several times I have hit record and it didn't record and I lost footage.  The indicators on the lcd that it's recording aren't that pronounced.  Like an icon that has red in it when it's not recording turns into a different icon that has red in it, along with a flashing red dot on the opposite side.  But I'm getting used to it.  I wish there was just something on the touch screen that would act as that button instead.  Another downside is that because it's so small I can't get the battery door open while it's on the tripod.  I wouldn't have to take the QR plate off, just slide it out.  But the battery life is not great and that's annoying to have to do so I bought a third party portrait grip so the battery now slides in from the side into the grip.  Also it has an additional crop in 4k mode that makes the kit lens not quite as wide as I would like.

All in all I think it's the best value 4k camera in that for $1000 you are good to go besides getting at least another battery.  For someone who is doing it as their job like Marc they would want to step up to the GH5 and a constant aperture lens.  Can't speak to the buttons on it but I think it resolves my other issues with the G85.  I think Marc would be better off in micro four thirds land coming from a camcorder as the sensor size change is not as dramatic as going to APS.  Doing more of the instructional content as opposed to artsy stuff you don't generally want shallow DOF and any close up shot at all on APS is a challenge to get very much in focus unless you've got your shop lit up like the sun.

The touch screen AF is fantastic on the 80d too. One of my favorite features is the Canon app. I haven't used it for video yet but for photos it was incredible. I could frame my shot and view it on a large iPad pro. I can then use the ipad to grab focus and change settings if needed and it also works as a remote. Now if this works for video, it's going to be bad ass since part of my issue is grabbing proper focus. How nice to do that from behind the bench when I'm in position for the shot. 

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I am on the budget end of things.  I use a Lumix FZ150 point and shoot.  I get results I am happy with and I like that I can save custom settings into it for my lighting requirements.  Having a "super zoom" with a single lens means one less connection area where dust can get into.  Previous to this, I used a Canon S100 pocket point and shoot that I bought for my wife.

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On 2/25/2018 at 8:27 AM, thewoodwhisperer said:

The touch screen AF is fantastic on the 80d too. One of my favorite features is the Canon app. I haven't used it for video yet but for photos it was incredible. I could frame my shot and view it on a large iPad pro. I can then use the ipad to grab focus and change settings if needed and it also works as a remote. Now if this works for video, it's going to be bad ass since part of my issue is grabbing proper focus. How nice to do that from behind the bench when I'm in position for the shot. 

I know your probably already invested in Canon. If you open to new systems the Lumix GH5/GH4 I've been told is one powerhouse of a camera. A friend of mine that does video product loves the GH4. I don't know how much record time you typically need but i believe DSLRs are always going to have a record limit to them where as camcorders won't. In the canon system they have their EOS 300 or 500 cameras that use SLR lenses but offer more of the camcorder controls.

If money isn't an issue camcorders of similar sensor size are going to offer better controls  and better video features but will be more expensive. Quality is fully dependent on sensor size not the shape of the body or the buttons on the out side. From the same sensor generation a 35mm sensor is always going to offer better image quality over a crop sensor. 

 

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