Chestnut

Questiones to the Conrators Floor Creaking

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Timing is everything when determining if something is HVAC derived. “Floor squeak” leads me to wood on wood (Tom’s story) or wood on nail. There are a couple of other options though, if HVAC is the trigger. What do your exhaust pipes run through or near? A PVC pipe sliding tight against the floor could make a squeak.  Any chance there is a draft damper in the exhaust line? 

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This is just a shot in the dark but maybe open up all interior doors and see if you get the sound then start closing off areas until you do, to maybe localize it.  Its doubtful but it could be normalizing from a pressure spike?  Maybe think of home renovations or winterizing things youve done?

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On 3/12/2018 at 9:00 PM, wtnhighlander said:

Since the house is multi-level, I assume some ductwork may run through the joists between floors? Perhaps a leaky duct is allowing some pressure build up, that moves the floor (or ceiling below) slowly enough that you don't hear the creak as it runs, but do hear it when the fan stops and pressure drops suddenly, letting the floor settle?

I have some of the same issues as the OP and I think there are a few things to consider:  (1) the thin gauge of the metal used in constructing the duct system.  And (2) the subfloor is not secured well to the joists. 

A few years ago I had an HVAC guy seal all the gaps in the HVAC system. So now in the summer when the air goes off you can hear the HVAC suck in from the sudden absence of pressure in the ducts.  The ducts expand and contract more compared to a system made of a heavier gauge metal.  Standing in the basement, one can look up and observe where the framer poorly attempted to secure the subfloor to the floor joists: several runs of missing nails.  Under foot you can feel many of the plywood corners where they meet under the carpet, and everywhere the floors creak when you walk on them.  At night, during the winter, with falling or rising temperature changes you get creaking, popping, and sometimes loud banging noises from expansion and contraction.

I don't know for sure but I believe if the ducting was made of thicker gauge metal and the subfloor was secured better to the joists, we wouldn't be having these issues.  The way houses are made today are like everything else.  Greed is the bedrock of the country but what good is all this money if you can't buy anything nice.  Disgusting, shameful really. 

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I've not gone this route only because I'm getting hardwood floors, so the subfloor issues I've endured will be addressed at that time.  But for those who want to take care of creaky floors and popping and banging noises in newer construction (1990 - now), there's a carpeted version and a hardwood floor version. 

The best advice I have overall is don't buy into subdivisions in the first place.  Pay now or pay later. 

 

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There have been some advancements in the condition. I recently have been leaving the furnace fan run to mix the air in the house. It's getting warm out so the upper floors are hot and the lower floors are cool. While the fan was running full time we still got the creaking noise. Now i can't tell if the furnace recently shut off or not but i doubt it's related to the pressure from the fan running.

I think the sub floor lifted off the joists and for what ever reason when we walk on it during the day it presses it down and then in the middle of the night the sub floor rebounds causing the noise.The subfloor is 3/4" T&G OSB i just checked the blueprints.

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Just so you know that you're not being ignored, I'll admit that I'm flummoxed.

[edit:  If you just get up at night to pee, like your elders do, you might get some confirmation of this theory.]

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