collinb

Help me understand

Recommended Posts

I picked up a piece of hard maple at WoodWerks the other day. Sat in the garage a couple of days before getting to it this evening. The change in humidity had added a bit of a bow at one point but not so much I couldn't work with it.

Before I took it home they offered to straighten one edge for me. They've got this neat saw with a laser guide and guide lugs at feed end. Just align the board to the laser and feed it in.along the lugs and it cuts a nice straight edge. No futzing with a fence or jointer.

So I take this board and attempt to cut 2 inches off that straight side. And what happens? The piece I cut off ends up with a bow in it!

Tale saw heel adjustment, perhaps?

maplecurve.jpg

IMG_20180319_193641690.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It is a real possibility with any piece of wood when you put it to you saw.  You never know what energy you might be releasing.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A straight line rip saw is cool, but watch out, once it goes, there is no turning back. If the operator isn't careful, you can lose a lot of material in the process, 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I cut to length the least I will need. If I needed several 2" wide pieces 18" long I will not make long rippings then cut to length. Plywood is OK. With solid wood I recently needed 7' rips 2 1/4" wide. The first rip is around 2 5/8". So I could re-true it. 1 or 2 rips won't pass grade. Sometimes it comes off perfect to warp. Not too often. It has to do with grain tensions. The center of the tree is much different than near the sap wood. Sometimes it appears to give a clue and sometimes false clues. Hard to figure. Part of the waste factor and hard to calculate.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've been cutting for 25% waste and that seems to cover most cases. It seems some pieces of wood just don't want to cooperate. :-(

This one stood out as such a problem I thought showing it might provide some insight.

10 hours ago, mat60 said:

Reminds me of working with Birch.

It's hard maple.

9 hours ago, K Cooper said:

Damned surprised  that you didn’t have a problem at the ts while ripping. 

It did get stiff.

I think with the old Craftsman table saw I had, without a riving knife, it *would* have been a problem.

**

I took what was left for a second rip but this time went to the bandsaw. Guess what? No bend!

It could be that the wood changed in those two extra inches. Or it could be something else. That's why I'm going to check the heel adjustment this evening.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Everyone knows how bad Yellow Pine is for this.  Before 1992, when the last local sawmill went out of business here, I could buy Yellow Pine in any dimension, and expect 99% of it to come off the saw with no stress.  Back then, they would saw it, air dry it on sticks for a year, and only after that, kiln dry it very slowly using sawdust as the kiln fuel, and finish plane it.  You could buy a whole stack of 2x4's, without looking at them, and expect the majority to be perfectly straight.

These days, they saw it, kiln dry it in 24 hours, dress it fast, and band the bundle.  You need to stand back when the straps are cut.

I had one old carpenter, L.W. (Jack) Jordan,  working for me that quit after that mill closed in 1992.   We'd build a wall one week, and the next week we'd have to fix it.  He spent the rest of his life building cabinets in the shop in his back yard.  He put his tools back in his truck that day, shook my hand, and said he was through building houses because of this #$%%^&* lumber.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What you need is a sliding table saw, no fence to jamb against . 

Fingers away and your standing to the side away from kicked back timber .

IMG_20180321_102803.jpg

IMG_20180321_102724.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, Midlife said:

What you need is a sliding table saw, no fence to jamb against . 

Fingers away and your standing to the side away from kicked back timber .

Last year I did something similar (and crudely) and subsequently abandoned it, though may have to resurrect it in a proper fashion.

That is, a 6' long board with a 3/4" track for the miter slot.

I could go with  12" W x 6' L to get most all jobs done.

**

Back to the op: I think the fence position may be the big issue. I cut another strip off using the bandsaw and there were no issues with bending.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, collinb said:

Back to the op: I think the fence position may be the big issue. I cut another strip off using the bandsaw and there were no issues with bending.

The bandsaw didn't have issues because the bandsaw blade flex's the TS blade does not. That board would go all wonky regardless of what tool was used to cut it due to internal stress.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This is why i dont use hard maple for cabinet doors anymore. All wood does it but hard maple is the worst in my experience

Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-G890A using Tapatalk

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.