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Hey all,

I wasn't sure if this was appropriate for here or "the wood" thread, but here goes. I scored some logs that were cut to about 18" long from a lot near my house that is having a house put on it. They had these beautiful piles of straight grained ash, elm, and oak free for the taking. I plan to use them for bowls. I know that when I turn them as wet as they are, they get rough-turned, and stored with some shavings and newspaper for several moths to dry out, then I finish turn them.

My question is, how should I best store these until I can make all the bowls I intend to? Do I need to cut them into blanks and let em sit? Do I need to seal the ends until I do? Are they fine to just sit as is?

Hope all is well over there,

John

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If you rough turn them leave the side thick, like 1" thick so that they won't warp too badly. You can put them in brown paper bags with their shavings to dry. It will probably take about 6 months for them to dry out. 

You can also cut them into blanks and then paint them with latex paint or use a wood sealer like http://www.rockler.com/green-wood-end-sealer-select-option. You will still need to wait several months for them to dry out.  I just cut up some green pecan blanks last night and I painted the ends. I'll check them around July to see if they're dry enough to turn. 

BTW, green wood turning is fun. You can get some long wet spaghetti like shavings. And if you don't mind the warping you can get some interesting shapes too. You can also dry out a green bowl in the microwave but that's a whole other thread. 

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You also might want to invest in an inexpensive moisture meter. From suggestions here in the forums you want the moisture to be less than 20% before you start working the wood. 

Here's an example of a meter: https://www.amazon.com/General-Tools-MMD4E-Moisture-Digital/dp/B00275F5O2/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1523112453&sr=8-1&keywords=moisture+meter

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+1 on the moisture meter.  I recommend pinless, but pin types work as well.  I got a combo unit from Electrophysics that is both pin and pinless.

I have had very little experience turning green wood (so far), but I have learned that you have to control the drying as soon as the tree is cut.  So if you can't coat the pieces you picked up right away at least get them into a closed plastic bag while you decide what to do.  Otherwise the blank is going to crack.

If you choose to turn a piece that is wet and are not going to complete the rough shape in one sitting you should bag it overnight, otherwise next morning may be :(.

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I have had very little experience turning green wood (so far), but I have learned that you have to control the drying as soon as the tree is cut.  So if you can't coat the pieces you picked up right away at least get them into a closed plastic bag while you decide what to do.  Otherwise the blank is going to crack.
If you choose to turn a piece that is wet and are not going to complete the rough shape in one sitting you should bag it overnight, otherwise next morning may be [emoji20].


It depends on the species, season, region, storage, and any given tree. I have logs that I’ve kept off the grass under my deck for 2 years that only have mild checking on the ends. I cut off the end, and then cut off whatever I need for a bowl. Seal it up and save the log for another day. Other logs have checked and split after 5 days cut.
Would not recommend a plastic bag unless you like moldy blanks (yuk)
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8 hours ago, vinnyjojo said:

Would not recommend a plastic bag unless you like moldy blanks (yuk)

 

You can put them in plastic bags but it's just a temporary solution until you coat them or ready to work with them. Everything I've read or experienced suggest you just put them in a bag for a few days. Unless you're trying to spalt them but that's another subject. 

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