procell40

Roubo Build ! (First real project! Yikes)

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Bought the Guild Project on 6/9/16 . Bought the Benchcrafted Kit on 6/16/16.  Then......nothing....

I've been really hesitant to start this project , mainly because I don't have many projects under my belt. 

They are exactly as follows:

  • spice rack (it's pretty sweet)
  • 2 band saw boxes
  • 2 cutting boards

I then decided i needed a dust collection set up , so that took a couple of months. Then needed to upgrade my planer head to a shelix.... got that done... shop layout wasn't ideal , so i changed that around.....several times..

Went out and got wood , let that acclimate for a few weeks ..........and I've run out of excuses to put it off any longer!

This will be a long build ! Let's see how it goes!

Thanks for checking this thread out.

 

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31 minutes ago, procell40 said:

Yes , my Roubo might look like it's made of plywood layers. 

You will be learning some new skills that will always be useful in the future.  The fact that you may end up with more laminates in your bench top then someone else does not matter.  Just enjoy the journey.

 

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1 hour ago, Chet said:

You will be learning some new skills that will always be useful in the future.  The fact that you may end up with more laminates in your bench top then someone else does not matter.  Just enjoy the journey.

 

Oh I'm already learning tons , and hope to learn alot more!

Got a fancy dial jig and some other items on sale , and wanted to double check that my jointer was set up correctly before i did my 'final' edge jointing....... the rest of the day , i didn't touch another piece of wood....

At one point my jointer was pretty decent.Had to double check the fence for 90 each time , but other than that it was great. I added a mobile base to it , and probably man-handled it too much when I did that, because when I used the fancy Dial-O-Matic jig , I found my infeed table was off over 20 thousands between the fence , and the other end of the blade (6" span) , the length of the infeed wasn't much better.

So after stripping the jointer down , watching a few videos on how to fix it , I rebuilt it , and now it's as co-planar as I can physically get it (less than .0015). Also stripped and clean the fence , and I can now reliably set it to 90 much , much easier. 

I also found out the fence has a bow to it ,  it's square to the bed the entire length , but it's definitely bowed. 

See pic with Green paint on it for an over exaggerated example.

Seems pretty even , with the 'peak' being over the blades , as long as I keep pressure up against the fence near the middle , I should still be ok for edge jointing right? I've done a couple now and they seems pretty good. But bear in mind these are either rejointing  clean edges from the sawmill , or from a track saw blade , not rough rough edges.

Due to my uneven floor , my jointer on a mobile base (which makes the jointer overall not level , i've had to align my support rollers with LASERS. 

So far , the hardest part i didn't even think would be an issue , in this build is the leveling of machine beds and rollers :) 

 

20180408_172526.thumb.jpg.f0680dbf91411466b5d76e86502ca184.jpgDialJointer.thumb.jpg.dacc31ee18638192b8a46d89d6d866a7.jpg

lasershow.jpg

fenceBow.JPG

comical.jpg

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I didn't make it past #1 above before I started feeling for you.  I had the same loud ass jointer when I started my bench build. I very quickly found out that it just would not cut the mustard.  The shelix head planer cost could have definitely gotten a full sized jointer on the used market but I digress.

Looking good so far. One cheap trick for the roller stands on uneven concrete is leveling feet. You can drill 4 holes and thread in the feet. A few spins to level it and use a sharpie to circle where they are for if you kick it. 

Have fun with the build, with the guild project videos, I honestly think that most people could pick up the video series with an understanding of milling and general router tasks and be successful with the tooling I see in your shop. 

Like mind, it looks like the hardest part is going to be, where does it go whole you're building? Space is at a premium.

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Just based on the tools and complete projects I can see in your photo's above I think you are selling yourself short. With the video's and help on this forum just take your time and you will be fine. I didn't find the project overly difficult but you do need to always be thinking ahead especially if you make changes. One change can affect another aspect of the build so you need to think it through. Having said all of that it is worth whatever it takes it changed the way I work and the quality of products I produce. I look forward to following along.

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47 minutes ago, pkinneb said:

Just based on the tools and complete projects I can see in your photo's above I think you are selling yourself short. With the video's and help on this forum just take your time and you will be fine. I didn't find the project overly difficult but you do need to always be thinking ahead especially if you make changes. One change can affect another aspect of the build so you need to think it through. Having said all of that it is worth whatever it takes it changed the way I work and the quality of products I produce. I look forward to following along.

Tools are all mine (minus the track saw) , but the completed projects are all hand me downs :) 

The bench with the sanders on it was my brothers , he got rid of it to make room for his 4' x 8' CnC , same with the plywood cabinet , that was his old CnC computer stand. the PaulK bench was all CnC'd too ( I did put it together though!)

Planer cart I did make though , but as soon as I finish the bench , and a few other projects , I'll be remaking that as well, without a screw gun and a circular saw , and a stack of scrap 2x4's :)

The videos are incredible , I was a little gun shy on spending the money on the project , not really knowing the extent of the instruction you get , but i figured it's a 1 time build , and would be worth it. It's completely worth it!

I'll be buying more guild projects in the future.

After reviewing the video's , and the blueprints , I don't think it's overly difficult as well (in my head) , just the skills are lacking , and I actually repeating what Marc does in practice should help me learn a ton (I've used a router table , and a trim router , but never a plunge router for example...)

 

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1 hour ago, Brendon_t said:

I didn't make it past #1 above before I started feeling for you.  I had the same loud ass jointer when I started my bench build. I very quickly found out that it just would not cut the mustard.  The shelix head planer cost could have definitely gotten a full sized jointer on the used market but I digress.

Like mind, it looks like the hardest part is going to be, where does it go whole you're building? Space is at a premium.

I was going to bite the bullet on a long bed 6" delta , but it needed some restoration , and I was eager to get started. Didn't want to use up my next 2-3 weekends on fixing up a jointer. Plus , i figured , for hundreds of years people got by with a #8 stanley ....so my little 34" craftsman should be just fine........it's not great , but I'll work with what I have for now 

I'm going to save up for a nice 8" down the road 

the used jointer market here in New England is pretty slim pickings it seems.

ok , enough babbling , going to go finish up jointing the edges so then i can tune up my tablesaw so i can trim all the boards to a uniform width!

Thanks

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1 hour ago, procell40 said:

I was going to bite the bullet on a long bed 6" delta , but it needed some restoration , and I was eager to get started. Didn't want to use up my next 2-3 weekends on fixing up a jointer. Plus , i figured , for hundreds of years people got by with a #8 stanley ....so my little 34" craftsman should be just fine........it's not great , but I'll work with what I have for now 

I'm going to save up for a nice 8" down the road 

the used jointer market here in New England is pretty slim pickings it seems.

ok , enough babbling , going to go finish up jointing the edges so then i can tune up my tablesaw so i can trim all the boards to a uniform width!

Thanks

More power to you. I've known a few people with the exact same jointer and besides the fence not locking down, it's also direct drive, under powered and the beds come out of flat with a sneeze. Yes, people got by with a #8 for years and if that's how you want to mill, get your swoll on, but don't fight it forever. 

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36 minutes ago, Brendon_t said:

More power to you. I've known a few people with the exact same jointer and besides the fence not locking down, it's also direct drive, under powered and the beds come out of flat with a sneeze. Yes, people got by with a #8 for years and if that's how you want to mill, get your swoll on, but don't fight it forever. 

not fighting it now :)

all the positives i said about that jointer in earlier posts i take back. Checked the fence again for 90 , and it was off , and this time around it took me a ton of changes before it was back to square. Just finished up the last of it now anyways (Let's hope my slabs are square!!)

Which leads me to my first build question....... I marked the freshly jointed edge (with that ribbon squiggle , whatever that is) , so i know which side to put along the TS fence so i can trim the boards to side......

But i didn't mark the face of the board that was up against the jointer fence... Since i skip planed every board (a decent amount too , each side are smooth as glass) , Can i safely assume that both faces are 90 to my jointed edge? And it won't matter which face a put face down on the table saw?

On paper it makes sense......but then again I once thought you could mill a board 4 side square with just a jointer....

Am i overthinking things?

Thanks

 

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Isn't it easier to take your trusted square over and just check the edge for square against the face? Don't trust. Verify

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4 minutes ago, Brendon_t said:

Isn't it easier to take your trusted square over and just check the edge for square against the face? Don't trust. Verify

That's a good point , didn't even think of that.

Also just realized i jointed the "easier" edge for each board , to have the least amount of material removed......... without really checking what part of the board would be best to keep.... my taller boards are fine , but those getting closer and closer  to 4 might have some knots on the underside now. 

Ah well , could be worse , and maybe my mistakes will help others down the road

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Boy I made that mistake a few times. I planed into knots on both the top and bottom of one slab. 

And you could take the minimum needed to get the second edge square and parallel, then turn it over and cut the rest from that side you would have wanted to waste.

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Not much to update , ripped everything to ~4.5" (ow my arms)

then ran everything through the planer to square and finish up the last edge. halfway through realized my planer outfeed tables were way out of line. Fixed those up , but still noticed squaring issues , i'll have to see how to calibrate my dewalt 735 to get true parallel faces. It could also be my new helix cutter head (I hope not). Since I really haven't cut anything that needed to be perfectly square and parallel since that was installed. 

everything is at 4 3/8" (ow my arms) , and I have perfect dimensions for the front and rear slab widths.

I only have 2 boards left over , and neither are decent enough for my dog strip laminate , so I'll have to hit the lumber yard for some more ash.

I'm a little worried , since I bought over 100 BF the first time around , and that got me exactly the slabs (minus dog hole strip and front laminate). and 2 boards left over , when according to the cut list , I should of gotten: Top, Legs and Rails, Roller Bracket, Sliding Deadman - listed as "minimum 101 bf raw stock needed"

The Lumber yard is over an hour away , so hopefully they'll have enough stock so I only have to go once. And Hopefully I get enough , without getting too much :) 

The wood there is all kiln dried , and usually pretty good when I hit it with the moisture meter , but how long is the minimum I should let it acclimate in my shop? If the moisture readings match my existing ash , just work with it right away ? or should I wait a few weeks 'to be safe' ? 

Not sure when I'll be able to glue up , Need to borrow my brothers domino and get that done

This weekend I'll be at Fine Woodworking Live ( I can just corner Mark and ask him all my newbie questions! He'll love that I bet!!) , and hopefully I can get up to the lumber yard the weekend after.

I do have a giant 16/4 piece of soft maple that's big enough for 2 end caps , so I guess I can mill that up while on my down time. 

Man , I wish I bought more lumber to start off with ;) But I still have a lot to do with the slabs still. 

 

 

 

 

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20 minutes ago, procell40 said:

Not much to update , ripped everything to ~4.5" (ow my arms)

then ran everything through the planer to square and finish up the last edge. halfway through realized my planer outfeed tables were way out of line. Fixed those up , but still noticed squaring issues , i'll have to see how to calibrate my dewalt 735 to get true parallel faces. It could also be my new helix cutter head (I hope not). Since I really haven't cut anything that needed to be perfectly square and parallel since that was installed. 

everything is at 4 3/8" (ow my arms) , and I have perfect dimensions for the front and rear slab widths.

I only have 2 boards left over , and neither are decent enough for my dog strip laminate , so I'll have to hit the lumber yard for some more ash.

I'm a little worried , since I bought over 100 BF the first time around , and that got me exactly the slabs (minus dog hole strip and front laminate). and 2 boards left over , when according to the cut list , I should of gotten: Top, Legs and Rails, Roller Bracket, Sliding Deadman - listed as "minimum 101 bf raw stock needed"

The Lumber yard is over an hour away , so hopefully they'll have enough stock so I only have to go once. And Hopefully I get enough , without getting too much :) 

The wood there is all kiln dried , and usually pretty good when I hit it with the moisture meter , but how long is the minimum I should let it acclimate in my shop? If the moisture readings match my existing ash , just work with it right away ? or should I wait a few weeks 'to be safe' ? 

Not sure when I'll be able to glue up , Need to borrow my brothers domino and get that done

This weekend I'll be at Fine Woodworking Live ( I can just corner Mark and ask him all my newbie questions! He'll love that I bet!!) , and hopefully I can get up to the lumber yard the weekend after.

I do have a giant 16/4 piece of soft maple that's big enough for 2 end caps , so I guess I can mill that up while on my down time. 

Man , I wish I bought more lumber to start off with ;) But I still have a lot to do with the slabs still.

I had some issues with my 735 and Byrd head and keeping stuff square. I contacted byrd about this and they really made it seem like there isn't any calibration. In communication i realized that it was only pulling material out of square that was tall and narrow. On wider flat stuff or when i fed 2 tall narrow pieces on either side of the cutter head everything remained right.

What i don't know is if the planer before the byrd head would do the exact same thing. My though is yes. I always feed 2 boards on either side or stacked side by side down the center. Haven't noticed any out of square issues since.

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6 minutes ago, Chestnut said:

I had some issues with my 735 and Byrd head and keeping stuff square. I contacted byrd about this and they really made it seem like there isn't any calibration. In communication i realized that it was only pulling material out of square that was tall and narrow. On wider flat stuff or when i fed 2 tall narrow pieces on either side of the cutter head everything remained right.

What i don't know is if the planer before the byrd head would do the exact same thing. My though is yes. I always feed 2 boards on either side or stacked side by side down the center. Haven't noticed any out of square issues since.

Thanks for posting this! 

I'll run some 'regular' wide boards though it and double check things that way , if that's still square , I won't worry too much about it. I wondered it if was just because of the tall thin nature of the boards. My wider boards (2.1+) had less issues than my thinnest boards (7/8) . I'll run a couple at a time if I need to do that again.

 

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Hmm. Not sure why you are experiencing more waste but that can usually be attributed to not perfect width boards for the slab. If you start at 5", you have 20% waste when you get to 4". That's a lot of waste when buying big quantities. The cool thing about Ash is that it's relatively inexpensive and in 8 quarter is that you can't always use it as a secondary wood on future projects or primary if you like light woods. I would over buy, and not have to worry as much about the yeild. I milled a tree for my bench so obviously wasn't working with FAS lumber. I had a decent amount of waste yet at the end, was still scrambling. I think all of my shelf pieces were resawn from parts of boards with knot holes in them. 

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