derekcohen

Drawing up and marking out

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It occurred to me that perhaps I look at drawing differently to others, and so I thought that I would throw this out here for viewpoints ...

In practice, also, I do not use a scale to measure much (after drawing up to life scale, which acts as a story board). Usually, I transfer dimensions with a divider, and then run them off with a cutting gauge - which is why I have so many gauges (I'm sticking to that story! smile.gif ). 

Here is my current project, an apothecary chest - making a template for laying out the vertical and horizontal dividers. The apothecary chest is complicated by having a curved front ...


Template2.jpg


Template1.jpg

This is the curved front (but not the template, which was made with a trammel to achieve a true curve) ...

Template4.jpg

Each one of these points was marked with two dividers (no rulers) ...

Template3.jpg

I draw onto 6mm MDF sheets. It is cheapish, and it durable - It will take being scraped if needed (to remove marks), a divider can leave pin marks (to which to draw), and a cutting gauge will leave clean lines. Later, the templates may be stored for another day.

What do you do?

Regards from Perth

Derek
 

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I'm going to start going more in this direction. This nonsense of trying to take measurements off a plan & transferring to the work piece for everything just doesn't work that well.

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I usually draw projects full size on 1/4" MDF sheets.

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Raided the scrap pile and used some 1/4" oak ply. 

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Honestly, I rarely draw projects out to use like a plan. I might sketch on paper to see if dimensions look right, and sometimes use Sketchup in 'X-ray' mode to confirm joinery. Otherwise, I (re)design on the fly as needed. But I rarely do any sort of built-ins that require precise dimensions to fit.

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I have a roll of butchers paper mounted on the end of my bench. I'll pull a length out for a basic drawing, then use shorter pieces for joinery details, and when the project is constructed, the paper becomes a glue and finish collector.

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 I am a "make a drawing complete with dimensions" kind of guy.  Tape the drawing to the wall and keep a red pencil handy for when the actual dimensions change as the proejct progresses.  I use a cadd program and find that I can expolore various options quickly.

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16 hours ago, Ronn W said:

 I am a "make a drawing complete with dimensions" kind of guy.  Tape the drawing to the wall and keep a red pencil handy for when the actual dimensions change as the proejct progresses.  I use a cadd program and find that I can expolore various options quickly.

Same here. I spend my day job dealing with and making drawings with dimensions so I just can't shake it. Generally I hand draw everything on paper and don't use cadd because I find that when I hand draw it I'm thinking more about what I am going to build and less about using the software, slowing down with the hand drawing helps me consider more options and issues.

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My new way if I am to duplicate something is to take a few pictures. Print in grayscale and add measurements...

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