derekcohen

Apothecary chest

Recommended Posts

9 hours ago, Chet said:

This is some real amazing work and attention to detail.  It is fun to watch.

I totally agree!

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

24 drawers and one has a false bottom ? After all it is a apothecary cabinet......

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Are you going to be able to batch out the drawer parts when it comes to cutting all the dovetails, such as using a dovetail jig and router or are you hand cutting them all?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Great work as always Derek! Really enjoying the build. I also like your use of bricks for added weight while stickering i will use this going forward on thinner parts like this.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 hours ago, Chet said:

Are you going to be able to batch out the drawer parts when it comes to cutting all the dovetails, such as using a dovetail jig and router or are you hand cutting them all?

Hi Chet

No jigs or machines for dovetails. I do ALL joinery by hand only. 

Regards from Perth

Derek

11 hours ago, Tom King said:

There is plenty of "quiet cunning" involved before any machine is ever turned on.

If you have to tell someone that some part of the process is all hand done, it doesn't matter to anyone, beyond the maker, whether it is or not.

I tell people, all the time, that I can do anything that I do, on an old house, the way it was done originally, with the same hand tools, or I can do it for about 1/5 of that cost only doing the part that you see by hand, and saving time and money with modern tools.   So far, I have not had the first client willing to pay 5 times the price to have the whole process done by hand.

My feelings too, Tom.

Regards from Perth

Derek

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Derek. Thanks for showing your project in detail. Excellent work with an amazing presentation. Besides woodworking I also enjoy you journalistic skills. I have one suggestion. I also like to run shorter material on the jointer. But if real short like you drawer sides you could double up the length as the sides are short anyway. Production will be faster and maybe a tiny bit safer. With Q sawn flat looking lumber, the yield should be about the same. glue double length book match  and cut later...All this has no affect on the overall outcome of your excellent work. A little bit of saved time...

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Looks great, but if it was me, I'd want a more substantial "fence" on the drawer side, for the marking, than a couple of layers of masking tape.  For a few, it would be okay, but I'm sure I would tire to the point that I would mess up holding it at some point, especially with as many repetitions as will be required.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
19 hours ago, derekcohen said:

Any thoughts how else this could be done?

Your way over my head already. I think this project and method looks great but i don't really know any better.

I"m not sure i understand the miter and rebate on the front, but that seems like an added unnecessary step. I'd rather cut the base of the side dovetails on an angle but again this is from someone that's never done this.

Maybe your way is better.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Looks great Derek! Just curious, regarding the DT's, why tape and not an actual shallow rabbit? I have used the Cosman technique for a couple years without issue. I would think a rabbit would give a more solid perch. Having said that your DT's look awesome so obviously what your doing is working for you :) 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, pkinneb said:

Looks great Derek! Just curious, regarding the DT's, why tape and not an actual shallow rabbit? I have used the Cosman technique for a couple years without issue. I would think a rabbit would give a more solid perch. Having said that your DT's look awesome so obviously what your doing is working for you :) 

The rebate is just one more thing to do. The tape is quick and works well enough.

Regards from Perth

Derek

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The sequential drawer fronts with the curves are going to be stunning !

I would love to know more about your shooting plane & the base for it .

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Steve, the shooting board is a Stanley #52. It came with a Stanley #51 shooting plane ...

LVShootingPlane_html_m5d43fafd.png

 

The Stanley #51 is the model for the LN #51.  I have one ...

LN51ShootingPlane_html_m73102486.jpg

However, I had tested the Veritas version for Lee Valley in pre-production form, and it came to stay ...

LVShootingPlane_html_mb21477a.jpg

There is a full review here:  http://www.inthewoodshop.com/ToolReviews/LVShootingPlane.html

And an article where I restored the Stanley #51/52:  http://www.inthewoodshop.com/ToolRestorations/Restoring a Stanley 5152.html

Regards from Perth

Derek

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, derekcohen said:

The rebate is just one more thing to do. The tape is quick and works well enough.

Regards from Perth

Derek

I'll have to give tape a try.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Man this thing is going to be awesome.

Darek, how far forward out in a project are you thinking? I would say that most of us could look at a standard project and mentally go through the entire build step by step before starting. That's with mostly 90 degree angles and standard joinery. I'm looking at this project and know that I would constantly be running into an "oops, I didn't think of that before" 

Do you build this thing mentally a few times before cutting or are you constantly adjusting on the fly?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Those are good questions, Brendon. 

I have run through the whole build - design and joinery. 

There are not just the drawers to complete, but the final styling of the carcase, including design and making the knobs, and then the base and its design and construction. I have not touched on the latter, but it promises to be interesting.

Regards from Perth

Derek

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I must assume that the ability to think so many steps in the future must come from your experience building complex pieces

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites