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I'm currently building dining chair's from marc guild with some red oak. I've found some crack in one of the leg when i cut those. I can't see through the wood, but there's a crack on both side of the leg and i'm worried about the structural ability of the leg. I'm not willing to spend a huge amount to get some west system epoxy for such a small need, it would not make any sens. I'm not quite sure if the epoxy from, let's say west system, is the same as those you can find in small syringe (to be extra specific, Lepage Speed set Epoxy). I'm not sure if it would be to thick or gel-like to get in the crack (from Marc's video, the epoxy he's using get every where easily)

 

Any help appreciated! Thanks

20180514_190725.jpg

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28 minutes ago, Maxime Boyer said:

I'm currently building dining chair's from marc guild with some red oak. I've found some crack in one of the leg when i cut those. I can't see through the wood, but there's a crack on both side of the leg and i'm worried about the structural ability of the leg. I'm not willing to spend a huge amount to get some west system epoxy for such a small need, it would not make any sens. I'm not quite sure if the epoxy from, let's say west system, is the same as those you can find in small syringe (to be extra specific, Lepage Speed set Epoxy). I'm not sure if it would be to thick or gel-like to get in the crack (from Marc's video, the epoxy he's using get every where easily)

 

Any help appreciated! Thanks

20180514_190725.jpg

Is not the same. That stuff is thick and won't good into the crack, which I believe is too severe to even think about saving. Red oak is super cheap and easily available. If you can match the color and grain, get a legs worth. If not, 4 legs of red oak shouldn't cost you more than $20

And I just noticed, welcome to the forum.

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30 minute Devcon epoxy might work , its available at places like Lowes.  You can put a shop vac nozzle on the underside of the crack and pull the mixed epoxy down into the crack.  Having tossed out that possible life raft replacing the wood is by far the better solution. Red oak is not expensive and easy to come by.  Real hardwood lumber yards are a must to find if you plan to continue woodworking.

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I'll third the opinion that quick-set epoxy will be too thick to penetrate that crack. You might try some thin CA glue (superglue) and clamping pressure. James Write recently published a fairly comprehensive test of several different adhesives, and CA glue performed unexpectedly well.

 Honestly, that really does look like something I wouldn't want to sit on. As the others said, red oak is about as cheap as hardwood gets in most parts of the US. If you are located elsewhere, maybe that's a different story...

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If you clamp that wood tight can you close the crack? If so, you could inject the crack with regular tightbond wood glue in a syringe and clamp it shut and leave it for a full 24 hours.

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I tought it was a nice occasion to test some repair, but it seem like no body would want to sit on it after the repair, so i will keep it to test my tool's setup.

I bought some extra wood in case i mess up something, I know what i'm doing tonight!

 

Thanks

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Personally, I would start with wood not having to be repaired but since you've seen on the repair route, if recommend taping off the outside of the crack so that errant glue or epoxy doesn't settle down into the oak pores and mess with your finish. What Steve said above is good advice. Using a shop vac to pull the adhesive down into the crack before closing it will help a lot. Once you have the crack pretty coated, a few clamps on the outside tight enough to close it fully but not so tight as to dent the wood for an hour or two should have you ok to resume by the morning. Good luck and let us know how it went.

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I say give the repair a shot with the above advice, for practice making repairs/using epoxy. I'd also use the piece for tool setup like you mentioned. It's always good to have a spare to get things set up so there is less pressure on the first cut. I've been trying to get in the habbit of doing this. The few times i have it's paid off nicely.

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You can make epoxy flow better if you heat up the component parts before mixing. Just stick the bottles/syringe in some hot water for a bit. This will also speed up the cure though, so don't use 5 minute epoxy.

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So, today i started over 3 legs (i had two other with minor crack), took about an hour and a half. I will probably play with the epoxy after the project, so i can stay concentrated on the important project.

But, this morning i did look a bit better at the leg i showed. I'm able to close the gap with my hand and when i'm in the dark, we can see a tiny bit of light through the leg, so i'm glad i didn't went with simple wood filler :)

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3 hours ago, Maxime Boyer said:

So, today i started over 3 legs (i had two other with minor crack), took about an hour and a half. I will probably play with the epoxy after the project, so i can stay concentrated on the important project.

But, this morning i did look a bit better at the leg i showed. I'm able to close the gap with my hand and when i'm in the dark, we can see a tiny bit of light through the leg, so i'm glad i didn't went with simple wood filler :)

I would recommend against putting it off. I'd fix it then use that as your setup piece for all future operations on the legs. Use it to set up your joinery and cuts instead of setting up on the actual piece

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