JayhawkCRNA

New shop and beginner woodworker

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  A small comment about 3 phase machines. We're about a mile off the road that has 3 phase lines, but I have two 3 phase machines running on VFD's.   I can't remember how much the VFD was for the 24" bandsaw, with 4.4 hp motor, but I'm pretty sure it was less than $300, and might have even been less than 200.   The VFD for the 10hp air compressor was also less than 300.   Both machines were cheap as dirt because they are 3 phase, and most people stay away. 

  If I ever buy another drill press, it will be 3 phase, on purpose, for the smoothness of the motor, and speed control of the VFD that would run it.   I would also jump at a nice, big wood lathe if it was 3 phase, because it would be cheap, and a VFD would give speed control without changing belts.

With a 100 amp panel, you can run anything you want to run for a hobby operation.

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Agree with Tom. 3 phase machines can be a bargain and are generally heavy metal to begin with. Grizzly et al sell 3 phase lathes with VFDs for speed control that get good reviews for convenience.

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2 hours ago, chashint said:

Well you are starting out with a space that's better than what I have been using for the last 30 years. Good for you, it will make everything funner. 

To my eye the white paint makes it a completely different environment.  You may not think it was worth the effort but I do...LOL

If you have the cash for all the new / used tools you're getting / planning to get go for it.  Speaking from experience though, financing this hobby (or most anything else that falls into the frivolous categories) isn't worth it. 

The tools you inherited are plenty good tools and it's worth learning to use what you already have before jumping into the upgrade rabbit hole.  I fight the upgraderittis syndrome very often myself, sometimes I come to my senses, sometimes I don't.

A few others have recommended doing the traditional crawling, walking, running progression and I fall into that camp too.  

You have a terrific foundation in place already.   True up your tools, build yourself a really accurate crosscut sled for the tablesaw.  Build some shop cabinets / tool carts with drawers to start honing your skills.   

Good luck to you.

Thanks for the words. I agree that I fight against Tool Acquisition Disorder but I have everything I need to get started.

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22 hours ago, Tom King said:

  A small comment about 3 phase machines. We're about a mile off the road that has 3 phase lines, but I have two 3 phase machines running on VFD's.   I can't remember how much the VFD was for the 24" bandsaw, with 4.4 hp motor, but I'm pretty sure it was less than $300, and might have even been less than 200.   The VFD for the 10hp air compressor was also less than 300.   Both machines were cheap as dirt because they are 3 phase, and most people stay away. 

  If I ever buy another drill press, it will be 3 phase, on purpose, for the smoothness of the motor, and speed control of the VFD that would run it.   I would also jump at a nice, big wood lathe if it was 3 phase, because it would be cheap, and a VFD would give speed control without changing belts.

With a 100 amp panel, you can run anything you want to run for a hobby operation.

Oneida Air's new cyclones are 3 phase motors with VFDs to give a little extra boost when it detects line restrictions.

I personally stay away from the older 3 phase machines just because it is an unknown to me. I'd love to have a 2nd table saw and can find all sorts of PM66s with 3ph motors but am not sure how a VFD would work on a table saw.

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I don't see why one wouldn't work on a table saw.   I have the one set on the bandsaw for a slow start, and the one for the air compressor programmed for a fast start.

Contact Jack Forsberg if anyone is considering buying a VFD.   He's selling them now, and is where I'll go for the next one.   He can tell you what you need, and how to set it up.

If you can operate a screwdriver, and wire strippers, you're good for hooking up a VFD, especially with Jack's help.  It replaces the switch on the machine.

I'm looking for a 3 phase Baldor buffer to set up as a slow/variable speed wet grinder-sort of like a Tormek, but with two diamond wheels.  I can't run dry grinders in the houses I work on, and plan to go back to wet grinding, now that Tormek is selling diamond wheels.  I want two wheels, and to be able to rotate the wheels in either direction, so that leaves out the Tormek.  Yes, I know I'll have to turn down the shafts on the buffer.  I've found a decent deal on some NOS ones, but am too cheap to buy them, so will keep looking.

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On 7/18/2018 at 9:25 PM, wtnhighlander said:

Many folks will recommend having a sub-panel installed in the shop, to help faciliate future growth and/or changes. 

A typical home hobby shop, even with multiple 220 machines, can do fine with a 60 amp panel. We don't typically run more than 2 big loads (DC + cutting or milling) at one time. Seems like Marc may have gone for a 100 amp or larger panel, but even in his shop, that's probably overkill.

I wish I'd thought of that!!

 

[edit: and I should have - I installed one myself in my last shop :-(

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On 7/18/2018 at 10:25 PM, wtnhighlander said:

Many folks will recommend having a sub-panel installed in the shop, to help faciliate future growth and/or changes. 

A typical home hobby shop, even with multiple 220 machines, can do fine with a 60 amp panel. We don't typically run more than 2 big loads (DC + cutting or milling) at one time. Seems like Marc may have gone for a 100 amp or larger panel, but even in his shop, that's probably overkill.

Marc installed electric heat in his shop... So that's 50-60 amps right there...

That's something you need to keep in mind when sizing things.

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7 hours ago, Minnesota Steve said:

Marc installed electric heat in his shop... So that's 50-60 amps right there...

That's something you need to keep in mind when sizing things.

I have monster electric heat in my house on a 30 amp breaker. Nominal draw is sub 20. 

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Looking good!

Baltic birch ply does have some heft to it. Mistakes are part of the journey and are often the best way to learn and improve. As you look at more of the project journals and showcases on here, even the people with most impressive pieces often made some mistakes along the way or ran into some issues. It’s being able to overcome these issues and how you fix your mistakes that matters. 

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1 hour ago, JohnG said:

Mistakes are part of the journey and are often the best way to learn and improve. As you look at more of the project journals and showcases on here, even the people with most impressive pieces often made some mistakes along the way or ran into some issues. It’s being able to overcome these issues and how you fix your mistakes that matters. 

Those might be the wisest words ever posted. If you're not making mistakes, you're never going to learn how to recover from them, which is just as big a skill as joinery or casework or any other facet of this sickness. Hobby. I mean hobby!

Great job on the media center! That is a piece to be proud of!

 

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On 6/5/2018 at 12:16 AM, bleedinblue said:

Without a doubt, the shaker table.  Didn't Tommy Mac 2.0 make a shaker table on the first episode of the new Rough Cut?  He skipped the drawer on that.  Take a spin through that episode.  It's a great looking table and a fantastic entry project.

And you can download the plan for free.

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On 9/22/2018 at 6:40 PM, JayhawkCRNA said:

So I just finished my first project. Media console Baltic birch plywood case and walnut top. Made lots of mistakes, least of which was dropping the cabinet when I was getting into the house. This thing is pretty massive/heavy, pictures don’t do it justice. It is 7ft longx22inchs deep. But good news is it held together except for one of the doors cracked along the rails/stile. I tried to fix with some super glue for now until it fully cracks and I will make a new door. I just wanted to thank everyone here for the posts and I have learned a lot and look forward to learning and doing more.

That's really awesome.  And I'm humbled - my wife (who doesn't live on my same time line) briefly wondered how long it would take to make something like that, then purchased one that is remarkably similar to yours.

Kudo's.

 

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