Ronn W

Veneer Wall Medallion

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That's a great top. How thick are your veneer pieces?

On the glue getting sucked through, did you  worry that there would be pinholes where the glue came up through that messes with your finish? Did you have any issue finishing?

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11 hours ago, Brendon_t said:

That's a great top. How thick are your veneer pieces?

On the glue getting sucked through, did you  worry that there would be pinholes where the glue came up through that messes with your finish? Did you have any issue finishing?

The veneer, from Veneer Supply, is 1/46" thick.  I can notice the difference between 1/46" and other veneer that is 1/42" thick.

I used a fiberglass screen on top of the work piece on the bag in lieu of a caul.  The glue that got sucked thru kind grabbed onto the screen and did not spread out.  A card scraer took off the littel blobs - no problem.  I have heard that using a screen actually causes more glue to be sucked thru becuase that is an " air path", whereas a solid caul sucks less glue through because there is no air suction through it like with a screen.  I don't have enough experience to say if that is really true.

I had no issues with the finishing other than my own self imposed ones.  The minwax poly went on thick and smooth without significant air bubbles or dust nibs. Just keep your touch with the sponge brush very light.  I was trying to get a perfectly smooth finish with all the grain topograhy levelled off.  I got the sapele to that point but then realized that I would proboably need another 7 coats to level off the Tamo Ash - very deep grain in the dark areas.  So I stopped.  I don't think that I willt ry for perfectly smooth again - I kinds like seeing the texture of the wood.  All depends on the wood , I guess.

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I Really don't know much about it.  I just bought the veneer because it looked like it would make a nice 12 piece hexagon match.  Here is a little info on the lumber.......

Tamo

150919582%20copy.jpg?timestamp=149064628

A species of common ash from the Far East produces one of the world's most rare and treasured woods. Native to Manchuria, but transplanted to the mountainous regions of Japan centuries ago, this particular ash owes its fame to a uniquely figured grain.

Tamo, also called damo, shioji, and yachidama, looks like white ash. Very few trees, however, produce figured wood that resembles peanut shells laid side by side. Tamo trees develop this peanut figure when strong vines encircle their trunks. This girdling restricts the flow of nutrients. So the tree grows in spurts, and the grain shows it.

When all timber harvesting was done by hand, workers would find such a tree, and in felling it, sometimes discover only half the wood to be figured. Because they had to carry the wood down the mountain on their shoulders, they only took the figured wood.

 
 

For centuries, the peanut-figured wood was reserved for items made for Japanese royalty and shoguns, due to the difficulty in obtaining it. Japanese master craftsmen, seeking a more reliable supply of figured tamo, eventually learned to tie ropes around saplings. The controlled construction of the rope produced, over many years, the same figure in the tree. However, as these propagated tamo trees were harvested, the figured wood grew rarer and rarer.

Now, Japan relies heavily on the import of fine cabinetwoods. And peanut-figured tamo-tied, slow-grown, and cultivated-has become very rare. It's available only in Japan as extremely expensive, minutely-thin veneer used for the most exclusive projects.

Illustration: Jim Stevenson
Photograph: Bob Calmer

 

and here is a little more.......

 

In its plain, unfigured form, Tamo Ash is very similar to the North American species Black Ash (Fraxinus nigra) , and is usually simply referred to as Japanese Ash (with the name Tamo being reserved for the more figured sections of wood). It is anecdotally reported that the peanut figure found in higher grades of Tamo Ash are caused by vines which wrap themselves around the tree’s trunk, restricting the flow of nutrients and causing the tree to grow in an uneven stop-and-go manner.

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