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Im looking to get a nail gun for stapling / headless pin nails and some trim nails.

What size air compressor should i go for?

Ive noticed there are a size sizes in liters

Thank you

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If that is all you are going to use the compressor for, you will be fine with just one of the small pancake compressors.

Something like this ...$99.00

shopping.jpeg.f3b63656d6e8ec1c65f48c37750176f2.jpeg

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I would not get that pancake. They are noisy as a bawling calf. I have been more pleased with the bigger brother of this model. This model is also in that sub $100 range  

California Air Tools CAT-1P1060S Light & Quiet Portable Air Compressor, Silver https://www.amazon.com/dp/B01LYHYHEA/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_i_jXehBbKB5MQVD

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42 minutes ago, Tpt life said:

I would not get that pancake.

I wasn't necessarily saying that model I was referencing the photo in case the OP was unfamiliar with the pancake style... my mistake.  Its not like it would be running all the time with the tools he mentioned. ;)

What you mentioned would be a great choice.

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I've got a little sausage tank compressor like the one Tpt linked to. Quiet is definitely a consideration. I often just use the little compressor if a single nail gun is all that I am running.  My big 40 gallon 6 hp compressor is better for running air drills, die grinders, impact drivers and spray guns that gobble up air at a furious rate.  Little compressors handle nailers, staplers  and blowing dust out of nooks & crannies very well. Senco is a good brand.

The pancake tank compressors come in a horizontal & vertical versions. They are heavier but have a slightly bigger volume tank. They also tend to be louder. 

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There is almost always a kit for sale that includes a pancake compressor, and two, or three nailguns for about the cost of a couple of guns.  Those are hard to beat on a budget.

If you want a good small compressor, that still moves a reasonable amount of air, the small Emglo twin tank compressor is a good one.

https://www.ebay.com/i/222999767271?chn=ps

Thomas is a good compressor company too.  They used to make the ones with the Senco name on them, but I'm not sure if they still do.

http://www.tcatsolutions.com/products/AirpacDatasheet.pdf

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6 minutes ago, Tom King said:

There is almost always a kit for sale that includes a pancake compressor, and two, or three nailguns for about the cost of a couple of guns.  Those are hard to beat on a budget.

If you want a good small compressor, that still moves a reasonable amount of air, the small Emglo twin tank compressor is a good one.

https://www.ebay.com/i/222999767271?chn=ps

I have had the Makita version (MK2000 I think) of that compressor for years with great luck!  In fact, I think I purchased it in 1994 and used it on a project today.  

If noise is an issue, this would not be the compressor for you!  It doesn't bother me considering how little it actually runs.

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I've been really pleased with my Rolair JC10. More expensive, but it's really quiet! 

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I have a Porter Cable branded  pancake compressor and a bawling calf can't hold a candle to how loud that thing is. 

After checking that link to the California Air compressor I am tempted to get the next model up just for the noise reduction.

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4 hours ago, chashint said:

I have a Porter Cable branded  pancake compressor and a bawling calf can't hold a candle to how loud that thing is. 

I bought a deWalt pancake that was rated to be significantly quieter than the Porter Cable.  Put in the basement shop and it's still way loud -- on the first floor.  Probably the loudest thing I have in the shop so far.

Fortunately I don't use it much, but I do tend to forget to shut it off when I'm done.  Thing kicks back on at some odd momment days later.  Scares the p....  Well let's just say I either gotta train myself to shut it off or start wearing Depends.

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9 hours ago, namluke said:

Im looking to get a nail gun for stapling / headless pin nails and some trim nails.

What size air compressor should i go for?

Ive noticed there are a size sizes in liters

Thank you

Any small pancake or double hotdog will work but stay away from the oiless ones. They are noisy and short lived. I have run a Campbell Hausfeld double hotdog for years with no trouble. Nailers use air in very short bursts so a small compressor can easily keep up. If you want to paint or especially do any kind of air sanding, a much bigger cimpressor is needed.

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3 hours ago, Mycrossover said:

Any small pancake or double hotdog will work but stay away from the oiless ones. They are noisy and short lived. 

This is completely dependent on design and makes your statement conditionally accurate. The California Air and Rolair both have oil free designs that are supremely quiet and not short lived. I own CA, Mick owns R...trust us or don’t. Just know these are a different style of operation. 

EDIT: I don’t propose these for continuous use. I am specifically recommending this for the uses mentioned. I don’t roof or frame with my CA except on my own house on my own. I air tires, blow dust out of tools, and run trim all over with it.

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Unfortunately these days sometimes even the reputable brands will put out a stinker.  And finding reviews of a specific model can be difficult . The opposite happens occasionally too, those rare bargains at HF that actually work well and survive . Caveat Emptor

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I have a Senco PC1010... Anyway, it's pretty quiet, like 70dB when running.  It's very similar in design to the Rolair and California air compressors already mentioned.   Quiet enough to use indoors without disturbing anyone.   A small compressor like this is fine for finish nailers.

https://www.amazon.com/Senco-PC1010-1-Horsepower-1-Gallon-Compressor/dp/B0000AQK78

 

You mention size in liters... so I assume you're not in north america... so not sure what's available where you live.

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I think buying an air compressor is going to depend on your use. If your going to use it a lot and it's going to run for long periods at a time, I'd look into one that you have to change the oil.

If you use it 2-3 times a year to fill a tire and shoot a couple nails the cheaper oilless ones will work.

The oilless ones don't have as much flow capacity. I think most of the 1hp ones i was looking at were in the 3 cfm @90 psi where as the emglow i bought was 4.8 cfm @90 psi. For me running an impact from time to time or an air wrench i wanted the extra flow. It's also has a 100% duty cycle rating.

As for noise the tools are generally louder next to my head  than the compressor 25 feet away so i'm always wearing hearing protection as it is. Not to mention if you shoot a nail and don't notice that the exhaust is pointed strait at your ear. With out ear protection that could be a painful mistake.

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I have the 6 gallon I believe dewalt it really isn't that loud. No problem with air guns or impacts or even blowing up tires. Conversely I had a 3 gallon harbor freight special that was worth it's price to throw out. I could shoot about 3 nails before it needed to refill and the motor would take about 10 mins to fill the tank. Took 45 mins to fill my daughter's blow up pool..half way...then I said good enough. 

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I already had this picture stored here.   This is what a real compressor looks like.  38.5 cfm at 175psi. and nowhere nearly as loud as a pancake.  It's designed to run all day, every day with a pressurized oiling system.  It'll run anything I have, including a 3/4" impact gun, and a 30lb. rock drill (small jackhammer that rotates the bit).   Motor is a 10hp 3-phase Baldor.

5a09cc3b8caa0_CIMG2337(1280x960).thumb.jpg.04868e8a013a426a5d514526ce8e708a.jpg

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California Air Tools 5510SE is the way to go in my opinion, I've had it for some time now. Works great, doesn't cycle constantly, pretty portable, a tad heavy with the steel tank that I got, they do have an aluminum tank that is lighter, but when I got mine there was a $80 difference in price.

But take it all with a grain of salt as everyone has their own opinions. :D

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On 6/9/2018 at 6:43 PM, Mick S said:

I've been really pleased with my Rolair JC10. More expensive, but it's really quiet! 

I just ordered this compressor to replace my PC pancake compressor  (see pic of red unit above that's the one I have only mine is black)  I have used it for 20 years with no issues, it will now go to my son in law. Yes it is loud and that is why I am getting rid of it but it does what s supposed to do, which is run nail guns, just fine. I am only changing it now because I use it for my car lift and am tired of hearing it cycle (when I forget to shut it off) while working in my office

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50 minutes ago, pkinneb said:

I just ordered this compressor to replace my PC pancake compressor  (see pic of red unit above that's the one I have only mine is black)  I have used it for 20 years with no issues, it will now go to my son in law. Yes it is loud and that is why I am getting rid of it but it does what s supposed to do, which is run nail guns, just fine. I am only changing it now because I use it for my car lift and am tired of hearing it cycle (when I forget to shut it off) while working in my office

I don't know how often mine cycles when I haven't used it, but it's rare - and quiet. I think you'll like it.

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I have a bostitch pancake for running the nailguns inside. I have a 75 foot hose for it so I can put the compressor in the next room and not have to listen to it.

 

By the looks of the beast above, I could stand to upgrade my shop compressor. I don't use it enough to justiify anything like that. If I am doing anything outside the house, I have enough hose to use the big one, though.

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Marc just posted the "Amazon Tool of the Day" in the FB group for a pancake compressor..  Looks like a good deal..

 

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Thank you for all your help.

Being from the UK im limited to what you guys have suggested.

But i have found this one on sale

https://www.its.co.uk/pd/MRC6U2IN1-Stanley-Bostitch-6-Litre-Roll-Cage-Compressor-and-StaplerBrad-Nailer-_BSTMRC62IN1.htm?gclid=CjwKCAjwpIjZBRBsEiwA0TN1r6vBENaD0a9p831vnC9i2xkvpj9A-rDRtiXbCL1ysyGIUUSPb6c1-xoCkZUQAvD_BwE

Will this be ok for just nailing, how many nails will it fire before it has to refill if i fire a nail every second?

Or should i go for this larger one??

 

https://www.screwfix.com/p/stanley-8216035scr011-24ltr-compressor-with-5-piece-accessory-kit-240v/48089#_=p

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Just a wild guess, but with the brad nailer it comes with,  I would guess a couple of dozen before you have to wait for it to pump back up.  The smaller the nailer, the less air it takes.   As an example, back when I was building new houses, once all the plywood was on the roof, nailed along the edges, we'd snap lines, and bump nail it off about as fast as possible with a big framing nailer.   With a 5 hp two-stage 80 gallon compressor, I would have to wait once for that one to pump back up for that job.   Rapid fire nailing takes a lot of air.

If you need 100 psi at the tool, any single stage compressor is going to have a hard time keeping up.  People think that a larger tank gives you a lot more air to use, but it really only does for the first tank full, and then you have to wait longer for the larger tank to pump back up.   Two stage compressors pump the tank up to 175 psi,  which gives you more usable 100 psi air than a single stage compressor that only pumps the tank up to 125 psi.   The volume at a given pressure that a compressor can produce is what matters for doing a lot of nailing, or just simply blowing air.

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