My very own millennial token coffee table


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9 hours ago, kyokahn said:

Now again, I know this isn't the preferred type of project around these parts

First off, it looks like you are off to a great start and keep us updated with your progress.

I would like to think that all projects are welcome and of interest around here.  I will say that doing a live edge build is not on my list of things to do but I enjoy watching the process and there is a possibility that something may come up or a technique used that will be useful knowledge for another type of project down the road.

I can see why they would want to relate Andiroba to looking like mahogany, it does have a similar grain texture.

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If it was me, I'd keep the river part on the narrow side. I also like the idea of having a bottom to the river, the problem with that is that the river part would get dark and hard to see through the resin. 

On 6/23/2018 at 1:13 PM, wdwerker said:

Brown or Rainbow ?

If this is goign to be true to Costa Rica he needs to add some alligator gar, rainbow bass, and well an alligator.

 

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On ‎6‎/‎23‎/‎2018 at 10:19 AM, wtnhighlander said:

The only suggestion I'll make, is that if you're going to make a 'river' table, make it a sure-enough "river"!  Inlay a piece of wood to give a bottom to the gap, add a layer of sand and CA glue, some fine gravel, and some smooth river stones. Wedge a few twigs of 'driftwood' in before filling with crystal clear resin.

If you really feel giggidy-giggidy, hand carve and paint a few tiny trout to embed in the resin....

 

7 hours ago, Chestnut said:

If this is goign to be true to Costa Rica he needs to add some alligator gar, rainbow bass, and well an alligator.

That's why I don't want to go too realistic here. If it's the river with the alligators, I'd have to make miniatures of trash bags, empty bottles and I wouldn't want to say why the river is a muddy brown color. Going for furniture, not a political/environmental statement! :D

7 hours ago, Chestnut said:

If it was me, I'd keep the river part on the narrow side. I also like the idea of having a bottom to the river, the problem with that is that the river part would get dark and hard to see through the resin. 

I wanted it as narrow as possible, but the material is only so wide and I needed a certain size, so it will be an average of 4" wide. The bottom is supposed to be translucent with  just enough of a metallic swirl to make it somewhat interesting, the upper layers will be blue translucent. Hoping I can make it clear enough, I'm doing a few tests with the resin and I have my first failure (runaway exothermic mess). I'll post some pics later.

On ‎6‎/‎23‎/‎2018 at 7:08 AM, wdwerker said:

Not exactly sure what the total design is going to look like but it seems you are doing great so far, especially considering the limitations of   your location. Your methodology seems sound. Please keep posting your progress !

I'm so glad the PMT isn't a unit of measure in my world. I work in inches and millimeters all the time. Euro hardware & Festool make that a daily commute.  It is fun to read about a  homegrown hybrid unit of measure. Looks like you have collected a pretty decent array of tools so far.

I must say I'm doing better regarding tools and supplies, and thank you! Finding suppliers is a bit of a scavenger hunt but after finding a few and better ways to import from the US, it's not that bad. Even PMT makes sense after a while :D 

On ‎6‎/‎23‎/‎2018 at 1:21 PM, Chet said:

I would like to think that all projects are welcome and of interest around here.  I will say that doing a live edge build is not on my list of things to do but I enjoy watching the process and there is a possibility that something may come up or a technique used that will be useful knowledge for another type of project down the road.

I can see why they would want to relate Andiroba to looking like mahogany, it does have a similar grain texture.

Thank you! And I agree with you. Also fun fact, Andiroba's name in Spanish (at least locally) is the (somewhat despective) casual diminutive of the word for Mahogany. Caoba // Caobilla. The workability is similar, as is the grain, the color is slightly more yellow and the stability isn't bad. It's just not as durable. Funny enough, Spanish cedar is more related to mahogany than this is.

6 hours ago, wdwerker said:

Adding a recess near the bottom for LED lights ? Perhaps just add a beach on the inside of a curve.

That would be fun for a beach terrace, but probably not so much for a small apartment living room :D 

6 hours ago, wdwerker said:

Maybe place a mirror below the clear sections ?

That's interesting, I'll see how a mirror looks under the table, especially if it's not translucent enough to see through, might help the effect somehow.

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So here's the first test with the leftover material 

IMG_20180623_220102.thumb.jpg.ee3aa68758b63728a7dfc2cf65b79bd6.jpg

First layer went on just fine

IMG_20180623_224004.thumb.jpg.851307e8982c3e211fce89d8485db26d.jpg

But then....

IMG_20180623_233853.thumb.jpg.a11f274c547c2350db60d601fc050f81.jpg

Second layer too thick, so it bubbled up. Here's a look at the back where I was also testing the sealers

IMG_20180624_004626.thumb.jpg.4fd1b666ad8dcdfd3b4a9a2e93f97227.jpg

So I set a second test with a 1x2 piece of laurel I had leftover from another project and some more ugly melamine

IMG_20180624_225906.thumb.jpg.f65b47bebbd5e98c125c484bd660cd02.jpg

First layer on, and that's it for now

IMG_20180625_021602.thumb.jpg.a1856d15d318ad0eb45580422698b859.jpg

 

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If it were me i'd try and pour the epoxy all from one point to kind mimic the source of the river so the pigment looks like it's flowing... I'm not sure if cremona did it this way but he really nailed the look i thought.

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A bunch of questions.

What type of resin are you using? For this application you probably want something that is slow setting, around 24 hours to cure, using a faster setting resin is probably going to end up with bubbles in it.

I'm assuming you used some kind of mica powder on that initial pour, the top of that casting looks good, but there are a ton of voids on the bottom. Either it wasn't fully cured when you poured the second layer and bubbled up or it set up super fast leaving the voids on the bottom. You could try hitting the melamine with some mold release (follow the directions and let it dry) to keep the melamine from chipping. Possibly the melamine is too rough and you are just getting bubbles due to surface imperfections.

Is the gel dye you are using comparable with your resin? Polyurethane resins really don't like moisture of any sort, using a water based dye will do really bad things to your casting (the Peter Brown video mentioned above). I can't tell if that was the culprit on the second pour or it was just too much resin at once.

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8 hours ago, lewisc said:

What resin are you using? From what I've read/watched on them so far, there are some which are designed for thick pours.

Countertop resin. Harder than the one made for thick pours and more UV resistance, at least better than the one I could find.

7 hours ago, wtnhighlander said:

It is possible that the problem you experienced is not just from pouring thick.

I think you're right, it wasn't only that it was too thick. Pigments are not working as planned at all, in the 2nd test I've had no exotherm but one batch of blue became purple, so I wouldn't discard its chemistry playing with the catalyzer.

6 hours ago, Chestnut said:

If it were me i'd try and pour the epoxy all from one point to kind mimic the source of the river so the pigment looks like it's flowing... I'm not sure if cremona did it this way but he really nailed the look i thought.

That makes sense! I'll give it a shot. Might have to add a temporary slope but I like the idea.

35 minutes ago, RileyD said:

What type of resin are you using? For this application you probably want something that is slow setting, around 24 hours to cure, using a faster setting resin is probably going to end up with bubbles in it.

It's slow-ish cure but made for thin layers (1/4" or so).

36 minutes ago, RileyD said:

I'm assuming you used some kind of mica powder on that initial pour, the top of that casting looks good, but there are a ton of voids on the bottom. Either it wasn't fully cured when you poured the second layer and bubbled up or it set up super fast leaving the voids on the bottom.

Bottom layer is a purpose made resin metallic pigment for countertops. When it bubbled up, everything cured immediately, the top is a big bubble, the bottom is tiny bubbles :D

37 minutes ago, RileyD said:

You could try hitting the melamine with some mold release (follow the directions and let it dry) to keep the melamine from chipping. Possibly the melamine is too rough and you are just getting bubbles due to surface imperfections.

Did this for the second test, hope it works!

38 minutes ago, RileyD said:

Is the gel dye you are using comparable with your resin?

I tested a smaller batch and it worked perfectly. A larger batch turned purple as I poured it. So I'm guessing the carrier is compatible, but the pigment itself not so much. I didn't use the gel dye at all on the first test, that deep blue you see came from a powder dye, alcohol soluble, that only shows up when the resin overheats apparently (didn't add any color on the second layer of the second test)

 

So I've got the timings and layer height figured out, the problem now is the dye cause the ones I have either turn purple or disappear entirely when the hardener is added. No reliable supplier of epoxy dyes around here, I'm thinking either india ink, or ink straight from a Bic ball pen as the next test subjects.

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On 6/23/2018 at 5:59 AM, kyokahn said:

that beautiful grain screamed back at me with some tearout due to interlocking (assuming that's what it's called):

Judging by the picture, this looks more like a local grain reversal than interlocking grain.  Interlocked grain generally applies to an entire board.  Regardless, I'd go after this patch with a scraper, probably a big overhand scraper for tearout that deep.

This hardly looks like a "token millennial" build.  Keep up the good work.

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On 6/26/2018 at 7:16 PM, Bombarde16 said:

Judging by the picture, this looks more like a local grain reversal than interlocking grain.  Interlocked grain generally applies to an entire board.  Regardless, I'd go after this patch with a scraper, probably a big overhand scraper for tearout that deep.

Reversal it is then! I took your advice and used a scraper after finding out the belt sander still left tearout, it worked like a charm.

On 6/26/2018 at 7:16 PM, Bombarde16 said:

This hardly looks like a "token millennial" build.  Keep up the good work.

On 6/28/2018 at 9:06 AM, Coyote Jim said:

I am very much enjoying this so far kyokahn! I like the writing as much as the woodworking. You gave me more than just a few chuckles so far.

I look forward to much more!

Thank you both! 

On 6/26/2018 at 8:07 PM, wtnhighlander said:

A metallic powder in suspension may be safer than a dye that dissolves into the epoxy. I have had bad experiences with some colors in epoxy, where the colorant caused the epoxy to never fully harden.

I had to do more than a few tests before finding a dye that didn't change color or entirely disappeared while curing, but I had to use both for the effect I wanted, and clear epoxy from the middle to the surface. Also changed the type of hardener. It did harden properly.

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I don't know that this qualifies as a typical millennial river coffee table. The top is good looking, but the base out shines it in my opinion. I think you did a great job and if all the token millennial coffee tables looked like this people wouldn't hold grudges against them.

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Super project.  The top looks great but the base really sets it off.  It is well above anything of this type that I have seen.  I am not a fan of this style top but you got real close to something I would put in my house.  Well done.

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I love it! I am not that much of a fan of river tables but that wood choice for that top makes it awesome.

And wow that dedication to the finish. Sheesh. I don't think I have that much patience.

Help me out though, what is that sealer you applied before the finish? I'm not familiar with what that is and why one would use it.

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