Beginner - Impulse Buy


jazzed
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The natural mate to the table saw is the Jointer. After that it is the thickness planer. With that you can learn how to properly dress lumber. It is the foundation of your work. If dressing the lumber is poor, it then becomes difficult at best for good work. Do not proceed on these tools until you learn the basic safety issues. This day and age there is a youtube for everything. You can buy dressed lumber but then you would be dependent on someone else for accuracy and doing it right. With knowledge and equipment you will likely do it right...

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Be careful the guys here will try and spend your money on expensive tools in addition to the table saw don't ask me how i know. If you see above they have already started. :P:D.

Joke aside the table saw is just the beginning. If you buy surfaced and jointed lumber you should be good for a while, the down side is that lumber tends to cost a lot more. I suggest making some stuff before you dive deeper. One thing that i just thought of is we might be throwing a ton of terms at you that you may not have any idea WTF they mean. This looks like a good way to decipher our language.

https://www.popularwoodworking.com/tools/woodworking-glossary

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3 hours ago, jazzed said:

I didn't intend to rant or cry, I thought I was merely stating the fact that since I was totally new to wood working I probably should have started off with some basic handheld tools as opposed to jumping right into a table saw. But then I guess to the more experienced woodworkers my post would be annoying.

IMHO when trying to "get by" one often gets frustrated and gives up.  The tablesaw is generally considered the most essential tool in a woodworking shop an you will eventually find yourself using it more and more.  I'm often guilty of over thinking things but sometimes you just gotta take a leap of faith!

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The saw looks great safety as a beginner is the biggest priority.The other thing and you seem to have that down is ask questions. The folks on here are full of advice on all topic's .There are 1000's of small projects on you tube and with some fair amount of instruction .You do not have to incorporate all that's there you may add some of your own idea's .Take your time and be safe from what your photo shows you will be fine remember mistakes happen and every person on here has made at least one. That's part of the fun of the hobby figuring stuff out Good luck and post some pic's of the next project and don't be afraid to ask question if your not sure of how to get there .There are no secrets in wood working "Well there are the biggest is not having the misses find out you bought another tool "GOOD LUCK" 

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13 hours ago, jazzed said:

My first post here after realization of my mistake. To refer to myself as a beginner might be a slight exaggeration. I've always been an admirer of woodworkers. Leading up to my recent purchase the only thing I've attempted to make is a 10x5 ft wooden rose trellis. I used an old Craftsman saw a friend had to cut everything out. Needless to say I was struck by the bug and decided I needed to purchase my own equipment.

There's a reason old sayings hold so much truth as "live and learn"... So I went to researching woodworking sites and equipment reviews. I haphazardly decided I really needed a table saw so I went out and bought a new Ridgid R4512 and assembled it myself. After assembly which took me all day and standing back admiring my assembly it dawned on me...now what? I went to thinking, what am I gonna try to build with absolutely no knowledge of woodworking, what else do I need? The only thing I had was a cordless Makita drill. I thought to myself, I might could build a simple birdhouse or more small rose trellis's and small container plant boxes. On hindsight now I could have attempted this with handheld equipment (circular saw, jigsaw, orbital sander, router and maybe a miter saw) as opposed to a table saw I bought on an un-thought-out impulse. I called Home Depot to see if I could return it (I haven't even turned to saw on yet) their answer was NO since I had assembled it and threw the boxing away. Now what was that about "live and learn":(

It’s a normal feeling when you enter into the hobby. You have big ambitions going in  and then you find yourself overwhelmed. Everything looks easy until it comes time to actually do it, but don’t sell yourself short. I was in your same position a year and a half ago. My advise (like many others here) is to pick out a simple project to start with. Something that you have some confidence in that you can complete. Importantly, it should include a feature that will test your skills. I am by no means an expert woodworker but with every project I include something that I have never attempted before, be it a drawer, side spindles on a table anything that challenges your skill. You’ll be surprised how fast you’ll advance your skills and how fast you’ll drain your bank account. Welcome to the forum and don’t hesitate to ask for help. There is a wealth of knowledge here and willing members to help.

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10 hours ago, Chestnut said:

If you buy surfaced and jointed lumber you should be good for a while

Pre Surfaced lumber is not one face jointed. It is thickness planed both sides. That means if it was crooked it stays crooked. If anything a beginner needs to start with proper dressed lumber. Cut to length what you need, joint one face for reference and the rest on the planer. Otherwise it becomes difficult to make tight joints. I'm certain that if I used store bought dressed lumber it would be reflected in my work. Dressing lumber is not recreation. It is time spent for an excellent outcome...

Then again it is a big financial commitment. Perhaps dress it by hand? Early on I made do without a thickness planer. I did one surface on the jointer, then resawed it for thickness. Max 6" wide. That meant to rip anything wider to 6" or less and glue it back together. It worked OK. The day I got my thickness planer, things got better...But at least I had flat straight lumber for a starting point...

I remember meeting a young woodworker that did amazing work and had one major tool. A jointer. He created one good surface and did the rest by hand. His only other power tool was a router table. His work was that of an experienced journeyman at a very young age...

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5 hours ago, curlyoak said:

Pre Surfaced lumber is not one face jointed. It is thickness planed both sides. That means if it was crooked it stays crooked. If anything a beginner needs to start with proper dressed lumber. Cut to length what you need, joint one face for reference and the rest on the planer. Otherwise it becomes difficult to make tight joints. I'm certain that if I used store bought dressed lumber it would be reflected in my work. Dressing lumber is not recreation. It is time spent for an excellent outcome...

Then again it is a big financial commitment. Perhaps dress it by hand? Early on I made do without a thickness planer. I did one surface on the jointer, then resawed it for thickness. Max 6" wide. That meant to rip anything wider to 6" or less and glue it back together. It worked OK. The day I got my thickness planer, things got better...But at least I had flat straight lumber for a starting point...

I remember meeting a young woodworker that did amazing work and had one major tool. A jointer. He created one good surface and did the rest by hand. His only other power tool was a router table. His work was that of an experienced journeyman at a very young age...

Maybe they don't sell s3s in Florida that is strait one side but i can get that stuff all over up here. Is it strait to woodpeckers .0005" standard no probably not but it's strait enough to build well pretty much anything.

It's cool that you swear by your jointer but I've made a LOT of stuff with out one. telling a newbie that he needs a machine that is difficult to set up expensive to buy before he can do anything is going to turn someone away from woodworking. Go ahead and argue that not having one will turn them away but i made many things for years without a jointer. In my opinion a planer is more important and I'd get the jointer 2nd. Maybe some people are better at utilizing different tools for different jobs. Speaking in absolutes puts you in dangerous territory to be wrong very easily.

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On s3s the 2 faces are run through a thickness planer. No face on jointer. That means if a 12' board is bowed, the bow may be reduced but is still there. If you cut to length your needs and face one side on the jointer the bow is gone. Also too many times the mill that dressed the lumber was off and not true.

My number 2 choice of jointer allows more accuracy on the saw. And the t saw is the center of my shop. It is just my view from my eyes. If you do not agree I still like you just the same. I'm stubborn, left handed, rebellious and old. But I don't mind your disagreement. And I like your work. And I feel differently. And I think we are both entitled...

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I’m old, stubborn, rebellious and right handed so we will just have to agree to disagree. My yard has an excellent choice of wood and accurate machines to plane them or straight line if needed. I have no room or desire for a jointer and haven’t for the last 50 years. I think the new guys just starting out can make just about anything they want with a few accurate tools and patience and help from forums like this. PS: I still like you too. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Hello Jazzed,

Welcome to woodworking.  

Taking time to dial in your tablesaw as accurately as possible and to learn about preventing kickback is time well spent. 

Building some jigs for your tablesaw using plywood is a very good way to start out.  A crosscut sled is very useful.  

Using poplar and oak from home Depot or Lowes is not a sin and you can build some very nice projects with it without having to have a jointer or planer.  Just pick out the straightest boards available.

I think outdoor furniture is a great way to get your feet wet.  

When it comes to adding tools I think a good square is essential and you will use it all the time.  

Take your time, don't buy stuff just to buy stuff.   When you actually need a tool is the time to get one.   

 

 

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@jazzed - something I have seen repeated often (including in this thread), is that picking projects you want to do and then figuring out how to accomplish them is a wonderful way to learn. I almost regret buying tools before I had specific applications for them (I say almost because I've since made good use of all of my large purchases). 

I have made the biggest strides in my own work by deciding on something I needed or wanted to build, and then breaking down the various operations necessary to make the thing. Then I think about which tools I could use to execute those operations.

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Well I didn't run off ha, just been out of pocket but interesting personal perspectives here and there. And there I was having buyer's remorse buying a table saw knowing absolutely nothing. I probably needed to start with a good handsaw at my level lol. I definitely don't foresee advancing to the point of needing a jointer/planer. I would like to have an outfeed table and a table saw sled but both are way way pass my ability at this time. I'm just a simpleton so my next purchase will be a gripper...I really need all my fingers! 

I personally had a few little personal projects around the house I wanted to do, mainly a few gardening builds, like the trellis I posted. I need to build several more smaller rose/climbing vine trellis's, a few plant container's and such. I have no aspiration in trying to be a master woodworker building and designing interior furniture, cabinet's etc...just some simple rustic projects. Thanks for the advice, it's really helping me put things in perspective for my level but I truly admire some of the work you guy's do...a big thumb's up!

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@jazzed - As I mentioned earlier, there’s plenty of help here. One thing I would like to mention is that you will soon find yourself needing to make mortise and tenon joints. Thay are the backbone of fine furniture construction. If you not familiar with this joint, google it, utube it, whatever you have to do to learn this joint, it that important. There are many different ways to make this joint, so research all of the techniques and choose your tools accordingly. 

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As of yet I haven’t even turned it on. I’m concerned that the blade etc needs to be properly aligned. I’ve watched some vids on this but I have little to no equipment I’ve seen used to do alignment. Any setup/alignment suggestions? And since I’ll be doing rough novice projects any blade recommendations rather than just the stock blade that came on it. I don’t need anything extravagant 

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The instruction manual will have some direction on adjusting the blade and fence. I have the smaller Ridgid jobsite saw and it needed a bit of tweaking, but it was pretty close out of the box. It was good enough for general construction/DIY stuff, but I wanted to get it a bit closer to perfect. As I recall you just need a combination square or two. I've used a couple of the Empire brand squares from HD, which are very affordable. They aren't Starrett quality or spec, but the ones I used were square. You don't need dial indicators to get it set up.

A Freud Diablo blade, readily available at HD, wouldn't break the bank and is much better than the stock blade. Depending on what materials you will use most often, you will want to select an appropriate tooth count. If the budget allows, you may want to get a couple different ones. If you want to spend more, you could get one of the higher end Freud blades, and of course the Forrest blades are very nice.

Before long you'll realize that while you don't need anything extravagant, you'll want everything extravagant. It's a common side effect of the woodworking bug.

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3 hours ago, jazzed said:

As of yet I haven’t even turned it on. I’m concerned that the blade etc needs to be properly aligned. I’ve watched some vids on this but I have little to no equipment I’ve seen used to do alignment. Any setup/alignment suggestions? And since I’ll be doing rough novice projects any blade recommendations rather than just the stock blade that came on it. I don’t need anything extravagant 

Just follow the set-up directions that are in the saw manual, pretty basic stuff, just need a decent square to do an adequate job on the set-up.  Freud makes good carbide tooth blades that won’t break the bank.  Not sure what blade comes with the saw, if it has carbide teeth it should cut adequately, if it is not a carbide tooth blade then chuck it in the trash and head to the store!

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4 hours ago, Cheeset202 said:

Just follow the set-up directions that are in the saw manual, pretty basic stuff, just need a decent square to do an adequate job on the set-up.  Freud makes good carbide tooth blades that won’t break the bank.  Not sure what blade comes with the saw, if it has carbide teeth it should cut adequately, if it is not a carbide tooth blade then chuck it in the trash and head to the store!

I'm just going to add to stick with the freud industrial. The freud diablo aren't bad but aren't as good. The Freud Industrial blades generally aren't that much more expensive.

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