Pekovich Case on Stand


pkinneb
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Just rubbing it in! I will definitely take this class if I ever see it offered again. I think I'll try to get in touch with Mike to see if he would have any interest in doing a weeklong seminar at our school. We've been kicking around ideas for visiting instructors. 

Very nice job. I love the bevel detail on the back. Those are the touches that set a project apart.

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2 hours ago, gee-dub said:

What?  No picture with Mike!?!  The cabinet looks great.  Thanks for sharing the pics.  I'm jealous ;-)

Yeah I love sharing pictures of my work but not really a picture guy myself :)

1 hour ago, Chestnut said:

This looks like an awesome experience. I really like the case and stand. The last picture is kind of an illusion and it's messing with me. It looks like the case is leaning backwards and is about to tip over.

Thanks Drew! Yeah it was a weird pic becuase I was trying to stay out of the isle way where folks were going by 

1 hour ago, RichardA said:

Ya done good Paul, looks like the class is deigned for workaholics. The cabinet came out 1st class.

Thanks Richard! It was a lot for sure but well worth it as well.

10 minutes ago, Mick S said:

Just rubbing it in! I will definitely take this class if I ever see it offered again. I think I'll try to get in touch with Mike to see if he would have any interest in doing a weeklong seminar at our school. We've been kicking around ideas for visiting instructors. 

Very nice job. I love the bevel detail on the back. Those are the touches that set a project apart.

:) If you check his website his contact info I there.

I agree I was surprised how such a simple detail could take a piece to another level. I can assure you other then the jewelry chest I just finished for my wife, I can't think of another piece where the back looks finished and this one is above that. Hearing how setbacks, shadow lines, etc can change the look of a piece was really good info for me. I really hadn't given much thought to things like that in the past but will going forward.

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1 hour ago, pkinneb said:

Hearing how setbacks, shadow lines, etc can change the look of a piece was really good info for me. I really hadn't given much thought to things like that in the past but will going forward.

I read something n one of his IG posts a few years ago that brought his use of setbacks and shadow lines to my attention. I tried to use it on the dresser I made shortly after that.

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2 hours ago, Mick S said:

I love the bevel detail on the back. Those are the touches that set a project apart.

 

2 hours ago, pkinneb said:

I agree I was surprised how such a simple detail could take a piece to another level.

While workng on my sideboard I was thinking that the back that Paolini designed is nice, takes extra work and no one will see it.  But after getting it together I was glad I went through the effort... Bu,t still, no one will see it.;)

What material did you use for the Kumiko?  Matt Kenney who also does a lot of Kumiko uses mostly poplar, I think.

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1 minute ago, Chet said:

 

While workng on my sideboard I was thinking that the back that Paolini designed is nice, takes extra work and no one will see it.  But after getting it together I was glad I went through the effort... Bu,t still, no one will see it.;)

What material did you use for the Kumiko?  Matt Kenney who also does a lot of Kumiko uses mostly poplar, I think.

Yeah but you will know if they ever do what they will see :)

It was some type of pine Mike supplied he also suggested aspen works well. The larger grid that holds it is butternut.

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On 7/26/2018 at 5:14 AM, Chestnut said:

This looks like an awesome experience. I really like the case and stand. The last picture is kind of an illusion and it's messing with me. It looks like the case is leaning backwards and is about to tip over.

I thought the same thing. With the chair legs under, it looks like it's tipped and leaning on the stool. That's scary.

So it appears this is a part in class build, part on your own? 

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11 hours ago, K Cooper said:

Thanks Paul for carrying us through your experience. Awesome piece! 

NP Coop. Helps keep me moving :)

2 hours ago, Mick S said:

Are you making a second one or adding detail to the one you made last week?

Just finishing the final details to the one I started in class last week Mick. When we left I was about 85% complete on mine.

2 hours ago, Chestnut said:

I really dig the wood on this, i poked fun before at all the effort you went throughbut it looks like it's made quite a difference.

What's the plan for finish?

Thanks! The stand will be fumed, then a coat of garnet shellac (1 1/2lb cut) prior to glue up and finally a couple coats of Waterlox. This is the same process I used for the other pieces in our living room. Since this will be in the entryway off the living room and white oak it seemed appropriate to me. The case will be Zinsser Seal coat shellac  (1 lb cut) followed by Waterlox.

 

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Nice. I asked due to wondering if you were going to do a waterborne on the case to keep the nice white look to the ash. Does waterlox yellow substantially? I have some ash with poly on it and am not sure that I'll ever put a yellowing finish on it i'm not fond of the look. Though to each their own i make no judgement just sharing opinion.

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17 minutes ago, Chestnut said:

Nice. I asked due to wondering if you were going to do a waterborne on the case to keep the nice white look to the ash. Does waterlox yellow substantially? I have some ash with poly on it and am not sure that I'll ever put a yellowing finish on it i'm not fond of the look. Though to each their own i make no judgement just sharing opinion.

I hear you. I will run some test boards this weekend but if it yellows some I am ok with that since the stand will be much darker regardless it should look good.

First up a I made quick and crude fuming tent out of wood scraps plastic and tape I had available. I hot glue the strips together and then tape up the seams. duct work tape probably isn't the best but its wide, sticky, and all I had left after running out of the wrap tape so it will have to do. 

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Then I set the stand and a test piece along with the ammonia under the tent.

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I leave my exhaust fan on the entire time, if I didn't have that I would do this outside. 

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In about 5/6 hours we will have a fumed stand ready for shellac.

 

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Well I cannot believe I spent 6 hours mostly correcting mistakes today but happy with the results none the less.

The side panels were supposed to be set back 1/16th of an inch from the top and bottom panels but mine ranged from a 1/32nd to flush so to correct this I made a 1/16" shim and together with my straight edge proceeded to plane an even gap into the panels. I wasn't able to get all the way to the ends so for that I clamped a guide board to the sides and with a sharp 1" chisel proceeded to clean up the ends.  

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Next my door gap was narrower on the hinge side than the other so I made some shims from ash and matched them as well as I could. Since they were only going to be about a 1/32" thick I used tape and super glue to attach them to a board so I could sand them to the desired thickness. When they were ready I just pulled the tape off

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I made some clamp culls and wrapped them in tape so they didn't inadvertently stick to the case then with a bit of glue and a spring clamp glued them in

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A couple passes with a sanding block and you can't hardly tell

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Much better...well at least in person it is LOL

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Next up I installed the bullet door latch. First I made a stop block out of 3/4" stock so I didn't go in to far

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Then I drilled through the bottom and into the door (after checking my measurements several times) with a 1/4" brad point bit before switching to a twist bit to drill into the door about 1/4" for the catch

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Then used some epoxy to glue the catch in. The latch will get glued in tomorrow and I will plug the hole with a dowel. since its on the bottom you will never see it.

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I noticed the door was bowed in at the top a bit so I added a stop block to keep it straight

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That should work...you can see a small corner of the stop in the bottom right of this pic

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Tomorrow I will clean up the back and glue it in before adding a coat of shellac to both the case and the stand.

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First up today I needed I 1/4"dowel to plug the barrel catch hole. I thought I would just use a dowel plate but since I was using butternut (softwood) it didn't work so well

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Top is through the dowel plate bottom is off the Elkhead tools Dowel Shaper TS

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To set this jig up you just use a test dowel, set the blade height, clamp to the fence, run one end of your blank in twisting it to get about an inch or two too chuck into your cordless drill. Then turn the saw on and run it through. When I make dowels for my box hinges I usually run them in batches since there is a bit of work to dial in the size. The nice thing is you can make them in any would you desire.

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All that for a 1/2"  plug -_-

Proud just like Mike's was LOL

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Next up I had to fix my last mistake. When I glued up the back one of the panels ended up off a bit (bottom right in pic) and it was bothering me so I clamped a steel rule to the back and used my marking knife and a scraper edge to fix it. I did this to both the inside and the outside.

Before:

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After:

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Here you can see the material that needs to be removed

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Next up I used a card scraper where needed and then finished with 220 sand paper in the ROS

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Then a couple coats of shellac

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Next up I glued the back in

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Finally today I added a coat of garnet shellac to the fumed stand parts

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This week I will apply 3-4 coats of Waterlox to everything and then glue the stand up. After that just some final touch up and finishing to the door grid. I also need to pick up some 1/8" glass for the door.

 

 

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Today I glued the stand together. This was a 3 part process using just a light coat of glue on the tenons only

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First I glued the top section together

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Second I glued the the leg stretchers to the legs. I dry fit the top assembly to the legs just to insure everything stayed square for the final glue up

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The third and final glue up was the leg assemblies to the top assembly...twice becuase I forgot the smaller curved stretchers the first time :o

Luckily I noticed right away and was able to get the leg assembly off one side.

I also used cutoffs from the leg tapers as glue culls over the proud tenons to insure everything was tight without damaging the tenons.

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Tomorrow a light sanding with 400 grit on both the stand and the case and final assembly can begin

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