Chet

Gap fix

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I just noticed this morning that I have a gap in my sideboard project and it is a show area right above where the top goes.  I had done numerous dry fits and marked all the tenons to match the mortise they fit into so there weren't any goof ups.  My guess to the problem is, I probably got to much glue in he mortise and had some hydraulic resistance but none of this matters now anyway.

My question is - what ideas do you guys have for a fix?  Its about a 1/32 of an inch gap.  I have used the CA glue and sanding trick to close gaps before with good success but this is in the corner and grain going two different directions. My concern would be that in sanding enough to cover the gap with glue and dust would leave a mark in the grain in on direction.  I don't want to make the problem worst and stick out more then it does but it would be nice to be able repair it.

And before anyone say to "just caulk it and paint it"  forget it my wife beat you to it.:D

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I would cut a sliver of wood the size of the gap and glue it in. Clean up any squeeze out then carefully use a scraper to finish it flush. 

I have never been satisfied with that sawdust glue thing. 

I usually use CA glue and solid wood. 

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12 minutes ago, pkinneb said:

I would probably spend waaay to much time looking for something with a grain match as well.

I would too. 

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51 minutes ago, pkinneb said:

I would probably spend waaay to much time looking for something with a grain match as well

 

28 minutes ago, Alan G said:

I would too

I started working on this right after I posted.

 

53 minutes ago, pkinneb said:

I also think a strategically placed plant would work well

You know, I actually have an very old silver tea service set that has been in the family for over 100 years that I was going to display on top of the sideboard. :)

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Honestly, when I look at the first picture it looks bad.  When I step back (second picture) I have to wonder if it isn't best to just leave it.  If you really decide to do something I'd go with the sliver of matching wood.  I feel your pain.

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I would leave it alone. It looks like cherry, and if so, as it darkens with age the gap will be less noticeable to anyone but you. I can’t see any fix that would look better than leavening it as is.

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You might be able to make a hand plane shaving the right thickness..... but isn't the piece going to get stained ? The shadow of the inside corner will make it hard to spot. 

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+1 to the crowd that says do nothing with it, you're always going to notice it no matter what you do but nobody else will. any "fix" is not going to match exactly IMO. the piece looks awesome Chet, keep up the great work!

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I wouldn't fill it. If anything, chamfer the edge just a bit, and chisel a matching gap on the other end. Then call it a "shadow line".

Seriously.

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22 minutes ago, wtnhighlander said:

I wouldn't fill it. If anything, chamfer the edge just a bit, and chisel a matching gap on the other end. Then call it a "shadow line".

Seriously.

Excellent advise and a great CYA.

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If that were my gap Id be worried that by trying to fix it I would make it look like poop.  I no it bugs you as it would me but Id leave it also.

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52 minutes ago, wtnhighlander said:

I wouldn't fill it. If anything, chamfer the edge just a bit, and chisel a matching gap on the other end. Then call it a "shadow line".

Seriously.

+2

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Thanks for all the comment people.  I have pretty much decided to leave it alone.  It is cherry and will darken over time and as mentioned above  have an item that may be the perfect thing to display in front of it. 

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2 minutes ago, Chet said:

Thanks for all the comment people.  I have pretty much decided to leave it alone.  It is cherry and will darken over time and as mentioned above  have an item that may be the perfect thing to display in front of it. 

Oh man. I would have to go on blood pressure medication. 

 

I have hydro locked a few joints and seriously, you can probably cut the right size piece to fit in the gap in no more than 3 tries by eye. The size doesn't need to be perfect but filling the black hole would be my priority. 

That is a prime viewing spot by the looks of it. I hope you reconsider. I've seen what you build,  I have faith in your ability to repair it well vs a 50/50 of being ok with it long term or not. That's a lopsided trade for not much effort.

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It looks like a big fat gap until you try to cut a piece to fit then it gets real small.;)

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1 hour ago, Chet said:

It looks like a big fat gap until you try to cut a piece to fit then it gets real small.;)

This was put under Advanced WW'ing right? You got this.

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A thin line of super glue will soak in and keep it from popping out. Let it dry and sand.

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