Tennessee Curly Cherry


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Here a couple pics of curly cherry lumber. Look at the outside of the boards in the first pic, thats what a curly tree will look like.

I want to show you what I got from Houston today. Talk about a box maker check this out.

Put a few more sticks of lumber up on the rails.

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54 minutes ago, Gary Beasley said:

 

Are you looking for anything fancy in the way of a bowl or do you want a nice big dough bowl or salad bowl?

I would want a couple fancy bowls.

If I kiln dry the big chucks of wood will that work?

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1 hour ago, Spanky said:

I would want a couple fancy bowls.

If I kiln dry the big chucks of wood will that work?

The usual process is to turn the wood wet down to a rough size, let it dry down, then finish turning it and finsh it out. Its usually a lot easier to turn the wet wood than dry. If you can kiln dry without creating internal cracks from the wood shrinking on itself it is doable. I am not very hopeful on that happening. 

Mark J you are welcome to chime in on this too, want to make sure Spanky gets the best.

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On 12/31/2018 at 1:41 PM, Spanky said:

Coop can you send me a Houston chin strap for my hat? We are getting 30 to 40 mph winds today. Hard to saw lumber with one hand on top of my Houston hat. :D

Celebrating last night blew the hat off of my head and we were inside :rolleyes:

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Possibly less, the reason for the rough turning is to speed up the drying process.  You dont want to dry too fast or risk crackng. Im not familiar with how fast the walnut will dry after the rough turn, but Ive had maple, poplar, and oak ready to finish in three months.

Now if you have a good fully cured board a bowl can be made by cutting angled rings and stack gluing them, or a fully segmented bowl can be made in a much shorter time.

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2 minutes ago, Spanky said:

I bet this morning your head felt good! :wacko:

Yeah, when I  woke up and was holding my head was when I discovered my hat missing. 

Actually I’m lying. That was years ago and I’ve gotten too old for that kind of s#*t. :D

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2 minutes ago, K Cooper said:

Yeah, when I  woke up and was holding my head was when I discovered my hat missing. 

Actually I’m lying. That was years ago and I’ve gotten too old for that kind of s#*t. :D

:lol: I thought a man born in 1929 was getting alittle to old to act like that. :lol:

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24 minutes ago, Spanky said:

We are talking about a year to get a bowl then right?

There is more than one way to get to round.  So a better idea of what you want to end up with would be helpful.  You mentioned a fancy bowl, but what are you thinking of?  Live edge?  A typical round form, but ornate?  Something atypical?  Will this be functional or simply decorative?  No particular idea, but just want something "special"?  

That box elder you showed off is beautiful.  It can be turned wet or dry, but I am assuming  this wood is still green?  You mentioned a couple of chunks, but how big?  The size and shape would have a lot to say about what bowls may be "trapped inside yearning to be free".

As Gary mentioned  a great deal of turning is done on green wood.  The bowl is roughly shaped with extra thick walls.  This is still much less volume of wood than the original piece and has a lot more surface area, so while you still have to control the drying process this usually takes only a few to several months depending on the wood, the size of your piece and your drying facilities.  It is even possible to dry certain small bowls in a microwave.  Once the wood is dry it is re-mounted on the lathe and final turned.  The wood will have warped (but hopefully not cracked) in the drying process and will now need to be re-shaped and brought to final thickness.  

If the wood is dry it can definitely be turned, and since there is no drying to do there is more control over the shape.  Dry wood is a little harder to cut than green wood, but the difference is not that great.  On the other hand finding a great big piece of wood that has dried without cracking is harder to do.  

And there's the segmented work and 'bowl from a board' techniques that Gary mentioned as well.  

 

Now some disclosure.  I know of these techniques, but I do not do them (at least not now).  All of my turning is on dry wood and on square blanks.  In fact the turnings I am doing these days call for very square and very thick blanks.   I haven't done any live edge pieces so far.  I gave it a try once, but failed badly.  It takes a lot of planning to bring a beautiful irregular bowl out of something that pretty much just looks like a piece of tree.  I hope to get into it eventually, but it will be a while, yet.  Similarly I don't turn green wood.  I've done a few odd bits at demonstrations and such, so I've had the experience (you will want a rain coat), but I am not set up for this.  Again I will someday, but probably not soon.   And honestly, at this point I haven't turned that many bowls yet (I'm working on number 18 now).  

 

So do you have a dry piece of something reasonably sized (say 6 to 12 inches, bigger is possible, but iffy) and reasonable shaped (not too free form)?  

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Heres a few Ive turned. The most fun was a large chunk of ambrosia maple from a neighbor, got 30 someodd bowls from it various sizes. Learned a bit of segmentation, now working on open segment bowls. One big one in the pictures is poplar from a tree that fell on a neighbors house. Some of the oak bowls shown are from the tree that knocked that one down.

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8 minutes ago, Spanky said:

First two pics are pretty but they are not my cup of tea. I would want something like the last pic.

The larger bowl? Its a pretty simple ambrosia maple bowl with the outside textured and painted. The oak was turned to size green and allowed to warp. The one in back it just poplar, trying out oddball shapes.

 

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This may be more like it. This was a chunk of hickory a neighbor had in his front yard for a year or so. You can see I had to fill some cracks in it but the well seasoned wood and bug holes really had some character. If you get lucky you might have something like that laying around. You ever find spalted wood in your pile?

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