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Mark J

Bird Bath Basin Bowl

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Dude that is awesome but it's making my head hurt. I can't comprehend how you make something like this.

Also are the legs very fragile? I'm assuming you've broken one of these or at least something similar then maybe not idk.

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1 hour ago, Chestnut said:

Dude that is awesome but it's making my head hurt. I can't comprehend how you make something like this.

Also are the legs very fragile? I'm assuming you've broken one of these or at least something similar then maybe not idk.

I'm laughing.  And yeah my head hurt some doing it, too.  

The legs could be broken off easily, but they are strong enough that with reasonable care I was able to complete the project, including a crap load of sanding, without breaking one off.  

37 minutes ago, wtnhighlander said:

OK, I'm going to need progress pics to make my brain understand how that came off a lathe. Awesome work!

I have lots of pictures.  I'll try to put something together tomorrow.

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Beautiful ! It looks like it's ready to walk away. Such grace and motion evoked by such a smooth simple shape. But where are you going to sign & date it ?

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Classy as hell.  it sure takes a lot of wood to make something so simple and sexy.   It  makes me think of Lauren Bacall.  Yeah I know.... way before your time.  But she was classy, sexy and beautiful.

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1 hour ago, RichardA said:

   It  makes me think of Lauren Bacall.  Yeah I know.... way before your time.  But she was classy, sexy and beautiful.

e5522f52b29ea08ffbc319730f6f2778--old-ca

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1 hour ago, Chestnut said:

e5522f52b29ea08ffbc319730f6f2778--old-ca

Looks like that tongue may have been inspiration for the Mark's piece. But his interpretation is certainly much more beautiful.

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Thanks all.  And I do recall  Bacall so I take that as high praise.  @wdwerker  I think you'll approve of the signature (above), but I never date them.  I could put the number on, this one was #15, but I haven't gone that far yet.  

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Holy crap now my head really hurts!! That is simply amazing I knew it had to be a lot more complicated then the final piece would suggest but wow that's unbelievable. My hats off to you and your turning ability!!

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This site shatters my reality from time to time. This is a prime example. The original looked awesome but the journey is as bizarre and amazing as the finished piece.

What rpm were you running your lathe at for the last step of the leg removal on the cole chuck? is there a trick to grain direction and leg placement? It looks like there was some blow out in one of the images.

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Absolutely brilliant - concept, planning, execution - all the way through. Really brilliant project! This makes me very happy that I signed up for a turning class for the fall semester! Now I can't wait!

 

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Thank you again everyone for the kind remarks!

 

On 8/2/2018 at 9:55 AM, Chestnut said:

This site shatters my reality from time to time. This is a prime example. The original looked awesome but the journey is as bizarre and amazing as the finished piece.

What rpm were you running your lathe at for the last step of the leg removal on the cole chuck? is there a trick to grain direction and leg placement? It looks like there was some blow out in one of the images.

I like that, "bizarre and amazing".  Pretty much right on summary of my experience with it.  I can't really tell you how the idea got in my head, but once it did this was the only way to get it out.  I suppose the inspiration might have come from Federal style furniture.  

The Cole jaws and the Longworth I tried before them both have a speed limit of 600 rpm.  So turning speed was between 250 and 500.  The Longworth is great, but it mounts to your chuck jaws and it is just not a good fit with my Super Nova 2.  It doesn't fit tight.  So I went back to the Cole jaws.  For some reason I accidentally included a photo of the Coles with some Blue Tape protection at the end of the post.  Didn't mean to, but I'll leave it in.

When you are turning in the corners of the block it is pretty much impossible not to have end grain tear out that takes out chunks along the trailing edge.  This will happen on the two opposing corners where the scrapping/cutting action is perpendicular to the grain direction.  Having learned this the hard way I periodically relieve (or camfer back) those two trailing edges with a file or Dremel as I turn the piece.  You can take it off yourself or wait to see what the blow out leaves you--and yes I have become very adept at finding said pieces in the sawdust and the use of crazy glue.  

But in this application the legs are slender so all the leading and trailing edges are removed.  There was however a certain misadventure with the DeWalt saw that ordinarily would have been a redesign opportunity, but I couldn't really do anything with it that would look nice.  

 

On 8/2/2018 at 10:06 AM, Mick S said:

Absolutely brilliant - concept, planning, execution - all the way through. Really brilliant project! This makes me very happy that I signed up for a turning class for the fall semester! Now I can't wait!

 

I am absolutely delighted to hear that you are taking the turning class.  After all the only thing a turning addict likes better than another fix is introducing another to the addiction.  Where is the class being held, Hotel California?

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9 minutes ago, Mark J said:

I am absolutely delighted to hear that you are taking the turning class.  After all the only thing a turning addict likes better than another fix is introducing another to the addiction.  Where is the class being held, Hotel California?

It's that addiction part that I've been avoiding. I did a good bit of turning back in the '80s, but have intentionally avoided getting a lathe since I retired. I know how addictive it is and I had too many other furniture projects I wanted to get done before dipping my toes back in. 

I'm taking the class at Santa Fe Community College. They have a really nice turning lab, equipped with several lathes - OneWay, General and others and very good instructors. Just short of Hotel California.

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That takes way more brain than I have. Quite remarkable. I don't turn at all, but this thread makes me want to try it out.

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Very classy !    It reminds me of the makers mark that lots of fine pottery has imbossed, you know the ones where the antiques roadshow expert sees it and instantly knows who made it. 

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Mark, I’m awed at the finished product and even more so at the design, layout and process. In pic # 11, there are two tools shown. Is the round curved one a support for the other, a knife I assume, while you were turning. Surely not as that would take an incredible amount of hand, eye, hand coordination ? I’m not a turner so forgive the lack of knowing the correct names. Also, did you have any conception as to what the grain on the legs would look like from looking at the square block, when you were laying it out? 

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5 hours ago, wdwerker said:

Very classy !    It reminds me of the makers mark that lots of fine pottery has imbossed, you know the ones where the antiques roadshow expert sees it and instantly knows who made it. 

And Maker’s Mark reminds of something totally different than woodworking. Well, maybe not. 

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2 hours ago, K Cooper said:

Mark, I’m awed at the finished product and even more so at the design, layout and process. In pic # 11, there are two tools shown. Is the round curved one a support for the other, a knife I assume, while you were turning. Surely not as that would take an incredible amount of hand, eye, hand coordination ? I’m not a turner so forgive the lack of knowing the correct names. Also, did you have any conception as to what the grain on the legs would look like from looking at the square block, when you were laying it out? 

Thank you (and everyone) very much.  Coop, picture #11 shows the carbide scraper tool sitting on top of the tool rest.  The tool rest is a heavy round bar with a hockey stick shape.  The tool rest has been carefully slipped into the hollowed out segment to bring the tool support as close to the work surface as possible.

As to the legs and the grain pattern, no my powers of 3 dimensional thinking don't go that far, so it's sort of luck of the draw.  I do give some consideration to which side should be the top, but that is more about how I think the basin will look, and whether there are any imperfections that have to be managed.

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