Bread Board End Question


Recommended Posts

I'm thinking this is mostly a matter of proportions and taste, right? A 45" table could be made of 5 - 9" wide planks or 6 - 7.5" planks, for example, so one option would be to match the breadboard width to your plank width, which, if nothing else, would probably be efficient in your production process and generally falls within the range Chet described above. 

On the other hand, those actually both seem like pretty wide breadboards to me. You could mock this up in sketchup to see the proportions pretty easily and decide if it looks right. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Handsome top.

Try googling "farm table breadboard ends."  You'll get a lot of pictures.  Look them over, and see what appeals to you.  There doesn't appear to be a common standard - some where each end is close to 20% of the overall table length, and some where each end is maybe 5% of the overall length.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Personal opinion i'd like them to be smaller. obviously you are limited to some extent to the lumber you can source an 11" breadboard is going to be tricky to source. My initial thought was 6-7".

Also i wouldn't think of it relative to the length but to the width. A long narrow table with a n 11" breadbaord would look more goofy than a table that is wider but shorter.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

If breadboards get too wide they start to look unattractive to me so this is a matter of taste.  For a table 9 feet long I would not try to proportion the breadboards to the table, I would proportion them to the aprons and legs.  For example, a table 5 feet long might have legs 2" square.  If I make the table 9 feet long I do not make the legs 3-1/2" square as they start to look clunky to me. Likewise, aprons of 3" to 4" would not become 5" to 6" in width due to a large field on the table top. YMMV.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 hours ago, Belle City WW said:

Here is a pic of the Legs for the table top:  Close to 4" Square.....

 

 

Fit for a king.  That's what I get for picturing something in my head when talking about how big "clunky" is :wacko:.  I was picturing four straight legs.  My point still applies despite my misstep. I would scale your breadboards off of your legs and aprons.  Sketch Up is a great tool for this sort of "what-if" planning.  The need for that in a compressed timeline is actually what drove me to learn it :).

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think it is good to think in terms of proportions. However, I think there is something else to consider. Typically, breadboards ends are not glued over their entire length. There strength depends on the tongue and groove and any pegs that are put in place. Therefore , I would be inclined to make the end narrower to limit the amount of leverage on the edge that could stress the joint. IMO, the width of the long edge boards you are using would look fine and not be too wide.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

26 minutes ago, Wimayo said:

I think it is good to think in terms of proportions. However, I think there is something else to consider. Typically, breadboards ends are not glued over their entire length. There strength depends on the tongue and groove and any pegs that are put in place. Therefore , I would be inclined to make the end narrower to limit the amount of leverage on the edge that could stress the joint. IMO, the width of the long edge boards you are using would look fine and not be too wide.

Thank you for that info!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share