derekcohen

Making mortices and tenons

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Thanks for passing this along Derek looks like a nice set up. it always amazes me how many ways there are to do things in the shop, your way is close to the way i do mine but i may have to steal that jig design, nice work sir!

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I like that jig too. I tend to drill out my mortises and follow up with mortise chisels, doing the lion's share of truing by hand. But I've been known to use the old router a time or three as well, for longer grooves with stops. ;)

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I like any method that produces larger pieces and less dust, which is what I see from your tenoning methods.  On the other hand, I seem to get more accurate and square tenons cutting the cheeks on the table saw (might just be my poor bandsaw technique.)

Your mortising jig is pretty neat; does the dust collection device work pretty well?

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PH, dust control is decent. I use a Festool CT26E. The hose was removed for the photo. The router is plugged into the vac for auto switch on.

Regards from Perth

Derek

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Hi Derek. Your methods always have excellent results. I have not cut a mortice in 2 years. I can see a possible need however now I use one of 2 festool dominos cutters. The small mostly cabinet or furniture and the big one for doors mainly...

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CO, I have a Festool Domino 500, which I purchased when building a kitchen full of Shaker style frame and panel doors. I have used it for a few other small jobs. In my opinion, it is very far from the standards attainable from a mortice and tenon joint. The latter is more flexible in design, stronger in application, and reversible when repairs are needed. The Domino is like a better biscuit or a better dowel. It has a place, but will never replace traditional mortice and tenon joinery. I simply cannot imagine the world with heirloom furniture joined with dominos.

Regards from Perth

Derek

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I think a mortice and tenon is stronger than dominoes. But the dominoes are strong enough. Under load, the domino joint  will break the wood but not the joint.

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CO, keep in mind that I am not a longstanding user of the Domino. Others may not experience my frustration. The problem I have with the dominos is that (1) you need to use more than one to get the width to prevent twisting, and (2) the joinery is difficult to unglue, should you need to do so. 

Regards from Perth

Derek

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Answer for (1) you can make your own dominoes. With your skills and tools it is a no brainer. When you have a need for a specific dimension, mill a piece a foot or 2 long and cut what you need and save the rest. I also will when needed have a few across a long joint. I almost always cut a bigger slot. I see no need. if concealed no need for a perfect fit left to right. It is perfect in thickness and adds to the speed and ease of glue up if side to side play is aloud. 2 I would not like to unglue a mortice joint glued with tite bond 3 either. The large benefit is a lot of time is saved...However it is far beyond me to criticize your exceptional work. It appears your pleasure is partially in the use of hand tools. And I completely understand about feeding a passion. And I admire it.

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2 hours ago, derekcohen said:

CO, keep in mind that I am not a longstanding user of the Domino. Others may not experience my frustration. The problem I have with the dominos is that (1) you need to use more than one to get the width to prevent twisting, and (2) the joinery is difficult to unglue, should you need to do so. 

Regards from Perth

Derek

Question of ignorance and not a challenge. Will hide glue not play well with domino like it does with dowel and traditional tenon?

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I still stand by the tool as being a great mortise machine. Buy it leave the dominoes in the store and cut your own tenons the traditional way and it's not much different than using anything else for mortises with the 1 big benefit being it's handheld. Quite a few times  i have made a few plunges side by side to get super wide mortises.

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