Damon777

Mission end tables

Recommended Posts

You did a beautiful job on that saw. The one I learned on was from the 40's. It was nice. I started in that shop in 1968. A year after that saw was built. An American tool to be proud of!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks again. For those interested, here is the resto thread over on OWWM:

http://owwm.org/viewtopic.php?f=1&t=194531&p=1359868#p1359868

 

I got the tables blown back apart last night, carefully labeling everything to make sure they go back together the same way. I'll cut the tops and shelf panels tonight, and probably sand to 150.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I suppose I should update this thread...

 

I had to put this project on hold for a while because it got too cold to finish in the (uninsulated) shop. However, I am correcting the insulation issue now. Walls are insulated, and I am awaiting steel for the ceiling so I can blow the insulation in up there. Anyway, I moved the tables inside so I didn't damage them during construction.

 

Now that I am waiting, I decided to try and get them finished while I have a break in the construction action. My furnace will keep the shop warm as well. The tops were not quite flat, and in fact developed a slight bow while sitting inside for a month. My mentor friend offered up hid drum sander, so I took them over and we flattened them. Cool, we were in business again. I took them home and set them with the bases in my finished basement.

 

I go back down this weekend (we sanded last week) to pull them out, and the tops warped in the opposite direction. I will be rebuilding them, with more attention paid to lumber selection this time. I glued them up so that the "curve" to the endgrain opposed the next board for the most part, but this bow one way then go opposite has us both puzzled. Any sage words from you guys?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sometimes, it just happens.

I try to do final milling just before using to help avoid stuff like this.  I'll rough mill everything early in a project and then final just before use.  This allows rough milled parts to sit for a while and do what they're going to do.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Latest thinking has it that orienting the boards with the end grain alternating up & down doesn't really make a difference. Sometimes it just happens. Once the finish is on the moisture changes in the wood will be less drastic & more even.

Were those tops, by any chance, laying down flat on another surface, or did you have them stickered?

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

They were sitting on top of the bases, with basically only the legs touching them, just like the pics above. The first time they were convex up, after sanding they moved to convex down a day or so later.

 

It isn't the best wood, so that may have a lot to do with it as well.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Flip the tops every day or so while they sit on the bases, maybe add some weight on top. If they flatten out start finishing and treat both sides identically, every coat, stain, etc equal on both sides.  The tops will need to be mounted using  z clips or furniture buttons to allow expansion and contraction in reaction to seasonal humidity & temperature.

If one side or the other absorbs moisture from the air or dries out faster than the other side the top will cup or bow. So when you get it even seal it up with the finish.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am thinking I just rebuild these tops, now that they have been sanded fairly thin. I may try the flip and such just to see what happens.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now