Wood table base for granite top


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Hello Guys, 

I figure I would share my ideas with the pros and hoping someone will be able to help me. 

I have replaced my countertops yesterday with granite and I decided to put granite top instead of the Faux granite top on my dinner table. 

The faux granite was heavy to remove but when putting the real granite on top it was way heavier! 

The table base looked well stable and structured that I thought it would be strong enough for the granite to set on top, however, after setting the granite on top of the table, it shakes easily and I'm afraid it is going to collapse! 

I have attached a picture of the table base frame. I'm thinking to add two 2x4 under the middle pieces to add central support and screw 90-degree metal brackets on every corner of the table (8 inside and 4 outside). Do you think this would be sufficient? 

 

Thank you!

MVIMG_20180930_140808.jpg

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You need to stop the legs from twisting  away from the aprons. So find a way to secure the legs to the aprons in a very rigid way. There are existing bolts but that isn't going to be enough.

The thickness of the granite will determine if you need any additional internal bracing. the stuff that is over 1" thick for counter tops can span 22-24". If it is thinner than that you may want some additional internal bracing.

Think about finding a way to secure the top on rubber bumpers so when it comes time to remove it you can separate the top from the base. It will be difficult to move still but will be far easier not having to deal with fitting legs around corners and it weighing a ton (literally?)

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Welcome to the forums!

I've had a few tables in the past that use that method of attaching the legs to the aprons, and all of them developed a wobble over time (without the added weight of a granite top!). As Chestnut said, you need to make the connection between the legs and aprons more secure.

What sort of tools and woodworking experience do you have?

 

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I have a lot of tools I can use, including a mitter saw. I've worked on some projects before so I think I have some experience woodworking. Always willing to learn more though... 

I fabricated a stand to be placed in the center of the table and bought 12 of Galvanized steel 90-angle to be placed between each of the leg and apron connection and corners between the aprons and middle posts. If the table kept wobbling after that then I will maybe add a couple of 2x2s under the aprons to make the legs more sturdy. 

https://www.homedepot.com/p/Simpson-Strong-Tie-Outdoor-Accents-4x-ZMAX-Galvanized-Steel-Black-Powder-Coat-90-Angle-APA4/300068611

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If rebuilding the base with wider aprons and solid leg joints isn't an option, I would consider adding some sort of decorative gusset (triangle bracket) from the side of each leg to the bottom edge of the aprons. Those steel brackets in the link you posted don't appear to be the appropriate size to join any of the parts I see in the photo of your table base.

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6 minutes ago, wtnhighlander said:

If rebuilding the base with wider aprons and solid leg joints isn't an option, I would consider adding some sort of decorative gusset (triangle bracket) from the side of each leg to the bottom edge of the aprons. Those steel brackets in the link you posted don't appear to be the appropriate size to join any of the parts I see in the photo of your table base.

+1

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@wtnhighlander How do you propose to build the base with wider aprons?

Update: I got 8x  4" heavy duty triangle brackets from HomeDepot and removed the old smaller brackets I had. While installing the 7th bracket,  i heard a crack! I checked the apron and I noticed that it is starting to crack under the screw. I immediately stopped and placed an emergency-measured 2x4 under the crack. While inspecting the legs, I noticed a small crack (Not sure if it was there before from moving) on the same corner of the cracked apron.  Not sure what can be done at this point other than getting an iron made table base... 

 

@Monico the granite slab is 72" x 44" with a thickness of 1 1/4". It should weight around 450 lbs give or take. The faux marble that was on top of the table was around 90 lbs. 

 

By the time I think of another idea or get an iron table base, I made sure to tell my wife to stay away from the table!! Crazy thoughts are going through my head at night and I was paranoid all day!

Thank you guys for your help, you are awesome!

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Hhmmm.... I was assuming that the stone top was not yet installed. I think an entire replacement for that base is probably the safest bet. It need not be iron or steel, a properly designed wood base will work. But I think attempting to re-inforce the base you have will only result in frustration. Those bolt-together leg joints are designed to allow easy disassembly, not to provide great strength. It seems that the wood itself may not be a good species for this application, given the cracks that are forming.

With the weight of the stone top, I would be inclined to use a base that incorporates a lower stretcher arrangement to prevent the legs from spreading apart. The popular 'farm house' style, using low stretchers between the legs across the width, and a center stretcher along the length, can support a tremendous amout of weight, and over a longer span than you have, with narrower aprons than your current base has.

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On 10/1/2018 at 11:32 AM, Hussein Diab said:

Hello Guys, 

I figure I would share my ideas with the pros and hoping someone will be able to help me. 

I have replaced my countertops yesterday with granite and I decided to put granite top instead of the Faux granite top on my dinner table. 

The faux granite was heavy to remove but when putting the real granite on top it was way heavier! 

The table base looked well stable and structured that I thought it would be strong enough for the granite to set on top, however, after setting the granite on top of the table, it shakes easily and I'm afraid it is going to collapse! 

I have attached a picture of the table base frame. I'm thinking to add two 2x4 under the middle pieces to add central support and screw 90-degree metal brackets on every corner of the table (8 inside and 4 outside). Do you think this would be sufficient? 

 

Thank you!

MVIMG_20180930_140808.jpg

I think it is very doable to strengthen the existing frame. This is how I would go about it.

First, remove the angled supports at each leg.  Inspect the bolts going into each leg and make sure they can be tightened when you reinstall the supports. Typically the bolts going into each leg are like lag bolts on the leg side and a machine thread on the other end.  You put two nuts on the machine thread side and jamb them together so you can wrench the bolts securely into the legs.  Then put a washer and nut on the outside of the angled support.

For the modification,  I would start with 8 of these brackets.  They require 6 screws for each bracket and they do not flex at all.

https://www.homedepot.com/p/Everbilt-3-1-2-in-Zinc-Plated-Inside-Corner-Brace-4-Pack-20492/204760767

They would install between the rails and the legs (2 per leg).  Use 6 #8 x 1 1/2" screws in each bracket.  You may have to use a shorter screw or vertically offset the brackets so that the screws don't run into each other.  Then reinstall the original angled supports.

Next add 3 supports to the support frame.  One support in each of the three sections with the supports going the table length direction (90 degrees to the existing supports).  You’ll have to offset the center one so you can screw into the end of each of the end supports.

Next get 2 pieces of  ¼” plywood each larger (length x width) than the table. Cut them so that each will be flush with the outside edges of the table support frame.  These are going to be glued and nailed (or screwed if you want) to the top and bottom of the table frame.  Each needs to be one piece.  Trim the corners around the legs on the piece that will go on the underside of the frame and let the top one go over the top of the legs (so it can stay rectangular without any cutouts for the legs).  Once these have both been nailed and glued to the frame, you have created a torsion box.  Be sure to glue and nail/screw along all the supports (perimeter and interior supports). The nails/screws need to be 4-6” apart if you don’t use clamps and calls. This will make an incredibly stiff support.

Next add the stretchers that wtnhighlander already mentioned, in the manner he describes.  The easiest way to attach these, to an existing table, would be to cut the end stretchers to fit between the legs.  Attach them to the legs using screws or dowels (two per leg). Drill holes to install either flush plugs or button plugs to hide the screws or dowels.  Attach the long stretcher to the end stretchers using either a mortise and tennon joint or with screws or dowels in the same manner you use on the legs.  Stretchers with the same width as the existing support frame should be sufficient.

Let us know how it goes if you go this route.

Quiller

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