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collinb

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16 hours ago, SawDustB said:

That was my setup until recently. It was ok, but it required frequently knocking the dust down to the bottom so it could be removed. I've since gone to a small 1 HP DC with a bag and it's so much better.

This seems to hit at a design shortcoming of these units. The material just isn't leaving as it ought.

I'm going to better seal my edges as proposed earlier and see if that resolves the issue. Still considering how to best accomplish the airflow goal. (But I will still check it regularly to see that it's a valid long-term fix.)

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I've always blown the inside of all my machines regularly to clear out any dust. My router tables always have the odd corner that never clears out well. Change the blade or bit, blow out the inside. Drilling some air intake holes in the front of my router table did help keep things moving. I had sealed it up too well.

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Assuming the motor problem has been addressed, @collinb the correct air inflow is just as important as the outflow.  You have to have adequate inlet/s or the problem will likely get worse.  So sealing up the leaks is a first step.

The inlets need to let in enough air to replace what your vac or DC is trying to remove.  If you are using a vac that amount is small owing to their lower CFM.  Still a zero clearance slot may not do it.

Also the inlets have to be placed so as to create an air current that sweeps the areas of interest inside the machine.  

I get much better dust collection on my router table when I remove one of the rings and give myself a larger table opening.  That solution does not work on the TS (and only for some router operations).

I'm not an aerodynamic engineer, but I remember an article by such an engineer in one the woodworking mags a few years ago.  Dog if I even remember which one.

To look at most machinery out there manufacturers do not spend a lot of time and money on this; Festool may be the exception.

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1 hour ago, wdwerker said:

I had sealed it up too well.

I'll have to give that issue attention.

27 minutes ago, Mark J said:

Assuming the motor problem has been addressed, @collinb the correct air inflow is just as important as the outflow.  You have to have adequate inlet/s or the problem will likely get worse.  So sealing up the leaks is a first step.

The inlets need to let in enough air to replace what your vac or DC is trying to remove.  If you are using a vac that amount is small owing to their lower CFM.  Still a zero clearance slot may not do it.

Also the inlets have to be placed so as to create an air current that sweeps the areas of interest inside the machine.  

I get much better dust collection on my router table when I remove one of the rings and give myself a larger table opening.  That solution does not work on the TS (and only for some router operations).

I'm not an aerodynamic engineer, but I remember an article by such an engineer in one the woodworking mags a few years ago.  Dog if I even remember which one.

To look at most machinery out there manufacturers do not spend a lot of time and money on this; Festool may be the exception.

This is going to take some research to be certain that I do it right.

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Sorry, looked for that article, but even though my wife says I never throw any of my woodworking mags out, apparently I did throw that one away.

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Seal up the areas where gravity will take care of the dust. Draw a line from your dust pot to where you don't want dust to settle and extend it to the side of the cabinet and put a hole there. The crude science is you want airflow to flow across the areas where you don't want dust to settle. Air  generally will move in a strait line at low velocities.

This is crude not entirely accurate but good enough.

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Something I didn't see mentioned: I you are using a induction motor, you may have gotten dust in the starting switch. It will let the smoke out of the motor if it stays shut or won't start correctly if it stays open. Easy to check or service. 

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On 10/30/2018 at 8:02 AM, collinb said:

Before I can get a hefty DC I'll need to run 2/20A + 1/15A to the garage. That's 1 for the DC and 1 for equipment, keeping my machinery separate from the rest of the house current. The extra 15A can run a modest AC in the summer to make the shop usable in Ohio humidity.

You'll be better off in the long run if you install a separate 220v sub panel.

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7 minutes ago, jplemons said:

You'll be better off in the long run if you install a separate 220v sub panel.

Definitely. Probably in the short run too. The labor to get the cable to the shop won't be any more, the cable would be about half for 30A or just slightly more for 50A, and the subpanel with breakers will be well under $100.00. And that will give you 240V as well for future needs

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Part of me wishes they would update the NEC to increase the number of circuits in garages. Yes i realize that 50% of people don't do anything with their garage but that leaves 50% of people that do something. For me i only have a 100 A main with no spare spaces so i can't and anything electrical and at this point running a circuit to my shed or garage would require a major update and it's frustrating. Stupid arc-fault breakers are absurdly expensive.....

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Putting in a sub-panel beside your main panel is not a terribly expensive thing to have done. That will give you spare spaces for future house circuits as well as a breaker for your shop sub-panel.

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16 hours ago, drzaius said:

Putting in a sub-panel beside your main panel is not a terribly expensive thing to have done. That will give you spare spaces for future house circuits as well as a breaker for your shop sub-panel.

A 50A subpanel with a single breaker was put in for the dryer.

Looks like I would be well off to just swap it for a bigger unit with more breakers. No need to run extra wire.

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