Moving large machines...sanity check


bleedinblue
 Share

Recommended Posts

I am almost certainly pulling the trigger on a Hammer jointer/planer combo machine soon.  If this happens, I need to figure out a way to move the machine from my driveway to my basement after delivery.  My basement is a walkout, so it means moving the machine around my yard.  I've got an idea but I want to air it out. 

The machine has a shipping weight of just over 700 pounds.

I have a backyard fence that has a 48" gate.  The yard is not completely level.

My line of thought is to build a platform with 8" rubber swiveling casters.  When the machine is delivered, have the delivery guy drop it onto the platform.  Ratchet strap the machine/crate onto the casters and roll it through the yard and into the basement.  I'd use a shop crane (cherry picker, engine hoist, etc) to lift the machine off the platform (and to dissemble the crate) and drop the machine onto a mobile base.

Does this sound feasible?  Am I missing an easier solution, or a reason as to why this won't work?  I do have a rental company near by that rents heavy and semi-heavy machinery, but I'm afraid my back yard fence will limit me there.

Here's a video of a guy taking delivery of the same machine.

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I would do a pallet jack. I would need to see the slope of your yard to get an idea of what you are dealing with, but the jack will let you control that machine pretty well. The problem with dollies is they can slip out from under the machine and result in a nightmare scenario pretty quickly. As for the yard, i imagine laying down a bed of plywood/OSB will be enough to keep you from sinking or getting stuck. 

 

Ive moved a few 1500-1700lb machines with just a pallet jack and it was pretty smooth. I also like the pallet jack has the panic Oh S* feature of dropping the load down if it gets away from you on a slope. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 minutes ago, Pwk5017 said:

I would do a pallet jack. I would need to see the slope of your yard to get an idea of what you are dealing with, but the jack will let you control that machine pretty well. The problem with dollies is they can slip out from under the machine and result in a nightmare scenario pretty quickly. As for the yard, i imagine laying down a bed of plywood/OSB will be enough to keep you from sinking or getting stuck. 

 

Ive moved a few 1500-1700lb machines with just a pallet jack and it was pretty smooth. I also like the pallet jack has the panic Oh S* feature of dropping the load down if it gets away from you on a slope. 

The yard isn't sloped too badly.  Photos wouldn't do any good, so that's about the best I can say, it's not "too bad."  I was able to easily use a dolly with rubber pneumatic wheels to carry my bandsaw around (300 pounds I think?).  The table saw was way too much of an adventure (400+ pounds)  My concern with a pallet jack would be the small wheels.  I could potentially do the leap frog thing with plywood sheets, but that scares me.  I might send a message to the rental place and see what equipment they have...they may have something I don't know about.

Just now, Chet said:

Are you talking pneumatic casters or hard rubber?  I think pneumatic would work because they would be wider and softer so it wouldn't get away from you.

Definitely pneumatic.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Im of the belief moving machines can never be over engineered. Assuming that little front loader can handle 700lbs, it looks like the ideal method of moving it through your yard. Renting a pallet jack is going to cost you $50, and renting that thing for half a day is probably $150. For the extra $100 its probably worth the peace of mind. Last thing you want to do is dump the new toy in the yard. 

 

I leave you with this to haunt your dreams. Skip to like 1:45

 

  • Sad 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

20 minutes ago, bleedinblue said:

Would something like this be overkill?  It seems like I could practically drive it into the basement, then use the lift with straps to lift the machine off the pallet and onto the mobile base. 

 

 

I think those small walkbehind units have a capacity of about 500 lbs.   I rented a Toro dingo before and used it to move rock... the bucket capacity was about 4 cu ft.

You'd need something bigger... like a full sized bobcat with a fork.

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

According to bobcat's specs, it can lift 850lbs, so you are getting close with the hammer. 

 

Also, im rarely on this forum anymore, but i think its pretty funny that a week ago you were talking about getting a 6" jointer with a byrd head. i just moved a 20" griggio into my basement a couple months ago, and I finally feel content with the size of my jointer. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

11 minutes ago, Pwk5017 said:

According to bobcat's specs, it can lift 850lbs, so you are getting close with the hammer. 

 

Also, im rarely on this forum anymore, but i think its pretty funny that a week ago you were talking about getting a 6" jointer with a byrd head. i just moved a 20" griggio into my basement a couple months ago, and I finally feel content with the size of my jointer. 

Compensating for something? Not going to lie i hardly ever max out my 8" but i routinely am frustrated with the 13" capacity of the planer. I don't get the 20" jointers.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

24 minutes ago, Pwk5017 said:

 but i think its pretty funny that a week ago you were talking about getting a 6" jointer with a byrd head. i just moved a 20" griggio into my basement a couple months ago, and I finally feel content with the size of my jointer. 

I blame Mel when these things happen. :D

I honestly had no idea the Hammer was as "cheap" as it is.  I thought the 12" model was in the $5k range. 

A moving company is a decent idea.  I'll send out a few messages to get an idea of how much they'll charge.  

  • Haha 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Three sheets of plywood, and slide it.  I wouldn't bother with building a special base with casters just for the move.  You will have to keep jumping the plywood ahead every eight feet of move.  You need three because you have to pick up the other end of the one it's going to be on next, and overlap it onto the next one.

Downhill is good.   We put a metal roof on a boat house a while back.  The metal came crated in specially made crates that weighed over 700 pounds each.  There was just (as always these days) two of us working, so I didn't want to make a bunch of trips up, and down the hill to carry each piece.  I used a riding lawnmower, and a rope to pull the crate down the hill a couple of hundred feet to as close as we could get it.  The big prybar, linked below, was used to steer it when it needed correcting.  Not being on wheels, it's not going to get away from you, and will stop when the pulling stops.  When direction needs to be changed, stop, re-aim, and go again.  Wheels make it easier to move, but also easier to get away from you.

We used a Maasdam rope puller  https://www.amazon.com/Maasdam-Long-Haul-Puller-4-Ton/dp/B002RL7UGW/ref=sr_1_4?ie=UTF8&qid=1541456988&sr=8-4&keywords=masdam+rope+puller    to pull the crates off the trailer, onto the plywood slideway.   You have to use 1/2" twisted rope with that puller.  I use a 150' length of such rope that I have for tree work, but the puller is also available with different lengths of rope-look on Amazon.

This rope puller works like a come-along, but you aren't limited by a length of wire.   I used it to load an 800 lb. bandsaw onto my pickup by myself.  It gets used a fair amount, and once pulled a very heavy gun safe up a flight of stairs, also on plywood laying on the stairs.  We use it when we move all our tools in and out of some of the old houses I work on, if we need to build temporary ramps.  I moved a 15" planer into a house by myself with it once.

Another thing that gets used a lot is a heavy duty prybar   https://www.homedepot.com/p/Ludell-60-in-18-lb-Pinch-Point-Heavy-Duty-Bar-50020/204326731?cm_mmc=Shopping|G|Base|D25T|25-1_HAND+TOOLS|NA|PLA|71700000034127224|58700003933021546|92700031755124850&gclid=Cj0KCQiA8f_eBRDcARIsAEKwRGd6An3xG5EooC2DbJFziUQXwuErYYzcEIHv2gXW_9WBo3L-gfdUW6UaAkuYEALw_wcB&gclsrc=aw.ds

with pieces of 2x, and 4x for fulcrums, you can move a house with it.

The most important thing is to take your time, and don't use your back.  There should be no need to get in a hurry to move it, so don't do it on a day when you are racing an approaching rain.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

The rental place says the mini skid loader in the video above could "easily" handle 700 pounds.  The specs on Bobcat's site says it's got an 850 pound capacity though...so...pretty close.

The pallet jack makes me nervous though, and to a degree it's the same with the skid loader, because I have to fit it through that 48" fence gate.  MAYBE the skid loader can lift the machine over the 4" fence and squeeze through the gate like that, but with a pallet jack I'd have to set it down and push it through length-wise.

I sent a message to the local "Two Guys and a Truck" place.  If they'll come out and move it for a hundred bucks, it'd be worth it.  I bet they'll have equipment to choose from and can get it done in fifteen minutes.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Checking their website today, the price is listed at $3300, UNTIL I log in, then the price jumps up to the regular price of $4200.  Yesterday it showed $3300 whether logged in or not.  I would have submitted the order yesterday but the customer service rep didn't answer my emails.  At $4200 plus shipping, I'm out. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

If you do go ahead with this or any other large equipment purchase I suggest you plan your "receiving" in two stages.  The first is to the garage (assuming you have one), and then into your shop.  I always envision that the delivery truck is going to pull up to my house in the middle of a cats and dogs thunderstorm.  I want to be sure that I can get the thing some place dry and safe in case I need to wait for the final move into the work shop.  

The other thing is be prepared for the shipping crate to be different than you were expecting.  This has happened to me with both of the large items I have so far ordered necessitating a new plan on the day of delivery.  Which is another good reason to go to the garage first.   

Link to comment
Share on other sites

My A3-41 came on a pallet placed on top of another pallet, so it was higher off the floor than I was expecting. (Certainly too high to "walk" it off). There are probably lots of potential solutions, but since I ordered the mobility kit I just put that on while on the pallet and then just rolled it down a ramp I built. Easy peasy, and reduced the temptation to lift it by the tables.

I agree with Mick that the packaging was very thorough with lots of Torx screws needing to be removed.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

  • Who's Online   1 Member, 0 Anonymous, 109 Guests (See full list)

  • Forum Statistics

    29.8k
    Total Topics
    405.1k
    Total Posts
  • Member Statistics

    22498
    Total Members
    3644
    Most Online
    ekatz
    Newest Member
    ekatz
    Joined