Sign in to follow this  
Chet

Two questions (Just for Fun)

Recommended Posts

While in the shop today I was listening to the latest episode of Fine Woodworking's "Shop Talk Live" and they posed a couple of questions and I thought it would be fun to put them before this crowd.

First question - If you could only use two types of joints for the rest of your woodworking career which two would you chose.

Second question - If you could only work with two types of wood for the rest of your career what would they be.  Price is no object on this one.

It doesn't matter if someone already mentioned it.

*******

I will start it off with mortise and tenon or floating tenon (I think for these purposes they are the same) and box joint.  I think for the type of things I like to build I could get pretty far with these two.

Wood - Cherry and Walnut.  They are good by themselves and they work good together.

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have limited experience in both of these, but if I had to choose now I would go with mortise and tenon and dovetail. I’m still struggling with the dovetail but I will get it some day. Oak would be my first choice of wood because that’s all I’ve worked with so far. Cherry would be my second choice as this is the next species on my list, but I could go with walnut too. The pieces @K Cooper churns out of walnut look beautiful.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I enjoyed that segment and Mike's attempts to get around the limitations of picking two :P

Joints: I was going to choose M&T and dovetail, but now you have me thinking M&T and box joint.

Wood: I'd also pick Cherry and Walnut. I love everything cherry, and then walnut to have a darker wood too. Haven't actually done much with either yet, but I have some projects with them on the to-do list.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Any M& T  [ through, haunched, blind  Etc:]  I to would chose Box joints....... Curly Maple [including ambrosia] and it's a toss up between Cherry and walnut.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Chet said:

While in the shop today I was listening to the latest episode of Fine Woodworking's "Shop Talk Live" and they posed a couple of questions and I thought it would be fun to put them before this crowd.

First question - If you could only use two types of joints for the rest of your woodworking career which two would you chose.

Second question - If you could only work with two types of wood for the rest of your career what would they be.  Price is no object on this one.

It doesn't matter if someone already mentioned it.

*******

I will start it off with mortise and tenon or floating tenon (I think for these purposes they are the same) and box joint.  I think for the type of things I like to build I could get pretty far with these two.

Wood - Cherry and Walnut.  They are good by themselves and they work good together.

 

Those would be my answers.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Dang @Chet thanks for xposting. That's a dern good question that makes me think. ( -1 on that part)

Two joints... Blue dream and GurilllaSk...oh..

 

Gonna have to go with the good ol M/T and... Crap. Probably Dovetail since I can use sliding dovetails instead of rabbits and grooves. And they Sexy.

Two woods. Easy. Walnut and Genuine Mahogany. I could go forever without missing the look of blonde woods.

Contrast, ha. Pore fill both with black TimberMate, sand back. Finish as usual. BAMM Who needs contrast when your wood is Coordinated to the sexiest degree 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If I could only choose two joints, they would probably be dowels and pocket screws, because if you can only use 2 joints, why bother?

As for wood species, american holly and gaboon ebony, because you said cost wasn't a factor, right?

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, wtnhighlander said:

 

As for wood species, american holly and gaboon ebony, because you said cost wasn't a factor, right?

Is Holly available in real Boards? I've only seen smaller pieces.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Max on Holly trees is almost 100 ft tall x 4ft in diameter. I've seen 80+ ft tall x 3ft in diameter Holly trees, a whole row of them, in an office park. I've cut a small tree sized overgrown Holly bush and the wood is hard as hell , it rapidly dulled the chainsaw.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Bell Forrest products has a 1 11/16" x 5 1/2" x 52" fairly clear board of Holly for sale $177... that's $50 a bd  ft !

Mahogany and Curly Maple. Mortice & tenon and dado/rabbet. Those are the primary joints I use day to day anyways. Dominos and 1/4" grooves for cabinet backs/ drawer bottoms. 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

For #1 i have a question is a long grain to long grain glue up a joint like a panel glue up? I could probably get by with M&T and long grain to long grain either flat in a panel or 90 degree like making a an L. If long grain isn't a joint i'd do dovetails.

#2 American Chestnut, and Claro Walnut.

Harder question would be if you can only use 1 joint and 1 wood species what would you choose? M&T and Cherry.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

1. Mortise and tenons and dovetails. You can make alot of stuff with just those. But, theres alot of stuff you cant make without miters. But I wouldnt miss miters much.

2. Walnut and cherry. Maybe maple. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The joint question is just too limiting, depends on what you are making. Casework is different than chairs which is different than drawers/boxes which is different than....  Part of my enjoyment with working in the shop is learning new joints. 

Now, if you were to ask  (and I think you are in a way) what are the most useful/versatile joints I'd agree with most on here that the M&T is at the top of the list for versatility and strength. You can make a whole chair using round M&T.

The next joint would have to be a butt joint, don't think I could build much without using a butt joint. Chestnut mentioned a variety of this joint but I don't want to be that limiting with just long grain to long grain.

Like others I would stick to what is accessible and plentiful for me, Walnut and Cherry.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A butt joint and a miter would count as a M&T if you put a Domino in there ! I always use a Domino, spline etc on miter joints like picture frames or doors. My usual drawer is butt joints w dominos and the bottom in a groove. I always offer dovetails and 98 % of clients are fine with Baltic Birch & dominos.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 minutes ago, wdwerker said:

A butt joint and a miter would count as a M&T if you put a Domino in there ! I always use a Domino, spline etc on miter joints like picture frames or doors. My usual drawer is butt joints w dominos and the bottom in a groove. I always offer dovetails and 98 % of clients are fine with Baltic Birch & dominos.

See that's the cheating i was thinking about. A M&T reinforced miter is a M&T or a miter?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's a mitered M&T! Butt joints , long grain to long grain and even scarf joints w a Domino would count in my book. I'm always thinking outside the box. 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this