K Cooper

Un Safest Tool In a Woodworking Shop

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This is a weird thread as it was answered two ways. I think my chisels are the least “safe,” but no tool scares me. 

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You guys have got me to thinking and I agree about the wife. After all these years of jumping , she has finally learned to address herself about half way from the house to the garage. Sometimes she still forgets. And then there’s the remote to the dc that is attached to my belt/pocket, that is the same height as my workbench. Late at night when all is quiet and that sucker comes on. 

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My wife knows not to come into the shop if I have power tools running. The door to my shop has a large window and my most used tools generally face toward the door, so she waits at the door until I see her and turn off the tool. If she has our daughter with her, she waits until I come open the door, after I put away/move anything as needed, to be sure it’s safe. 

She’s an ER doc and is very aware of the potential dangers of the tools. 

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I had a good conversation with Megan when we moved in together about coming into the shop while tools were running. She asked about flashing the lights but realized it was a bad idea before i got to correct her. Now she usually waits until i notice her or she waits until no power tools are running. Though some hand tools are just as if not more dangerous.

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Because I sometimes do delicate inlay on guitars and small items it's not always about the danger to me if I'm startled.  With the small tools like a fret saw or tiny chisels you can get hurt but you'll likely heal quickly and the injury will probably be small.  With this type of work I'd really hate to be in the final steps of hand cutting a delicate piece of Abalone and have it break because someone came up behind me and caused me to twitch or jerk by being startled.  I get into my own little world when I'm doing work like that and am oblivious to someone entering the shop. I don't need or want anyone 'announcing their arrival' like it's some big event.

David

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I definitely get nervous about getting startled as well.  I work in the garage attached to the house, so there are two means of entry and I have 4 small children (6 and under) who don’t always listen when I tell them to stay out.  I like the suggestions about having someone circle around into your peripheral vision as I’m not sure I’d hear a yell over the tool, DC, and my hearing protection 

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On 11/24/2018 at 12:59 AM, Woodenskye said:

The operator is the most dangerous.  Whether we are tired, over estimate our own abilities or whatever it still comes back to the 1 person that pushes the power button.

I stopped reading after this response.

I was going to post: "A distracted/ complacent/ inexperienced operator"

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36 minutes ago, Chestnut said:

Not all of us wear dentures.

Ha! Former member Particleboard's dentures got sucked into the dust collector... he also suffered at least a couple of accidents on his table saw... twice he lost his very same finger... it ended up looking like an alien body part.

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I tell people to either wait till I'm done with the machine or to call my cell phone. It's always set to ring loud and vibrate. If I even think I feel the phone vibrating I finish the cut then check it.

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On 11/23/2018 at 9:24 PM, Chet said:

The router and for some reason its the one in the table more then the hand held.  

Same here. I think it's because when your hand routing, you've got the machine in  between you and the bit but when table mounted that bit is spinning right in front of your face.

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