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Bmac

Harvesting a Nice Black Walnut Tree

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You need to claim that little piece of land Jarhead.  Times are gonna get tough, and the white collar stuff is gonna dwindle away.

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1 hour ago, RichardA said:

You need to claim that little piece of land Jarhead.  Times are gonna get tough, and the white collar stuff is gonna dwindle away.

There's about 7 cousins silently waging a cold war positioning for the chance...

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Just saw this post, don't know how I missed it.

No, the mill did not come Monday because we 2" of rain over the weekend and the ground was a swamp. Rescheduled for this Sat (12/22) and now it's suppose to pour on Fri, can't win! Maybe it won't rain as much as they are predicting.

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You tease! Just as you got to the good girlie part of the walnut, you quit taking pics. :D Did they come out to your expectations? 

Nice woodworking stash for a couple of years from now bud! 

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22 minutes ago, K Cooper said:

You tease! Just as you got to the good girlie part of the walnut, you quit taking pics. :D Did they come out to your expectations? 

Nice woodworking stash for a couple of years from now bud! 

The walnut was fine, nice straight grain and clean. No dead spots or rot, so it was as I was expecting. I milled 3 smaller walnut trees last year and got some better figure in that wood, but it probably won't be as well behaved as this. I might actually like the shorter logs more when I  mill those, I'll show photos of those I promise.

Sorry about the lack of photos, I was running full speed today, milling 11 logs can take the starch out of you.

19 minutes ago, Spanky said:

No pic of you stacking 10/4 walnut? :) Good pile of lumber!

Sorry for no photos of that, but rest assured i stacked it all. Time for bed now.

Need to get you some photos of me milling with my chainsaw, that will show you I'm not allergic to work!

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6 hours ago, K Cooper said:

I know the feeling. $75 - $100 per hour, make every minute count! 

He charged $80 per hr, in 7 hours he milled 11 logs, quartersawing 4, not a bad day or price in my mind. 

Spanky, that's a fair price and a full day isn't it?

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2 hours ago, Bmac said:

He charged $80 per hr, in 7 hours he milled 11 logs, quartersawing 4, not a bad day or price in my mind. 

Spanky, that's a fair price and a full day isn't it?

QS 4 logs plus milled 11 more in 7 hours  you got your money out of the mill guy. I would say he had alot of help to mill that much in 7 hrs.

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33 minutes ago, Spanky said:

QS 4 logs plus milled 11 more in 7 hours  you got your money out of the mill guy. I would say he had alot of help to mill that much in 7 hrs.

Yes had some help, 2 sons that helped me take the boards off the mill and stack the lumber. Sprayed all the Oak with boracare also before stacking. 

Had a friend operate a skid steer that helped move logs. The mill guy didn't have to hardly leave the mill.

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9 hours ago, Bmac said:

Yes had some help, 2 sons that helped me take the boards off the mill and stack the lumber. Sprayed all the Oak with boracare also before stacking. 

Had a friend operate a skid steer that helped move logs. The mill guy didn't have to hardly leave the mill.

Man I would like to cut lumber with all that help. 

One ole man doing it all!

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49 minutes ago, Spanky said:

Man I would like to cut lumber with all that help. 

One ole man doing it all!

Well they are never around when I'm running the chainsaw mill. 

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Question for us newbies. Do you always square up the log first?  Most milling I have watched, which admittedly is Matt Cremona, it he doesn't square up the sides, just starts taking slabs out.  I assume its because of the live edge, but I thought you might do it in the above way to remove as much sap wood as possible?

Thanks,

Jake

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48 minutes ago, JakeL said:

Question for us newbies. Do you always square up the log first?  Most milling I have watched, which admittedly is Matt Cremona, it he doesn't square up the sides, just starts taking slabs out.  I assume its because of the live edge, but I thought you might do it in the above way to remove as much sap wood as possible?

Thanks,

Jake

Cremona sells slabs as they fetch higher prices and are easier to cut stack and dry. He also has a video on cutting boards which is what Bmac did. Not sure the benefits of squaring to cants and then running boards or cutting slabs and then edging but I'm not a pro.

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1 hour ago, JakeL said:

Question for us newbies. Do you always square up the log first?  Most milling I have watched, which admittedly is Matt Cremona, it he doesn't square up the sides, just starts taking slabs out.  I assume its because of the live edge, but I thought you might do it in the above way to remove as much sap wood as possible?

Thanks,

Jake

Chestnut is right, there is a big market for live edge slabs, I'm not selling though. I'm not into live edge pieces, so I usually only leave live edge on boards cut from a crotch. I like to have at least one edge squared. Here's why I like to edge my boards;

A lot easier to bring them right into the shop and starting working on the when they are edged. If you are not interested in the live edge look than that irregular edge gets in the way when you are breaking down the board. I can run an edged board against the table saw fence or bandsaw fence, use your fence at the miter, and you can joint a board if you have at least one edge squared.

Taking off most of the sapwood and bark makes the boards easier to stack since they are more uniform in shape.

Taking off most of the sapwood and bark makes the boards lighter, big when moving them by hand. 

Bugs love the bark and sapwood, getting rid of it helps eliminate that issue.

Bark often is dirty, not the best stuff to be cutting with you shop tools. 

Those are things that come to my mind immediately, by no means a complete list. 

 

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15 minutes ago, wtnhighlander said:

I'm looking forward to the "live edge" fad going away. Think lumber is ridiculously expensive when you have to cut it from a live-edge slab.

You can get mill run walnut around here for $2-3 a BF slabs start at $5 for junk and go up from there. Cherry is even cheaper at like $1 a BF slabs start at $4 for junk and the table top size ones are like $10/BF. I agree i want this fad to end. I think it's close because it's started to show up in chain furniture stores and that's generally the signal of an end of a trend. I don't see it ever becoming a "classical" style that will have any staying power.

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The high grade lumber on a good size log will be two or three boards under the slab on a log. So you cut the high grade lumber off the four sides. You have a square that will start to cut lower grade lumber. I cut for grade, some people just cut lumber.

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