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Another Roubo... (now finished!)

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On 1/20/2019 at 8:13 AM, Chestnut said:

 

I'm really questioning the tail vise. I've been on the fence about it for a long time. I'm probably going to do it for no other reason that it's not terribly expensive but if i don't do it retrofitting it wouldn't be fun at all.

Totally understood. I'm probably in the minority here but I either would not build for the tail vise in another roubo, or, I would have it on the other side of the bench.  Likley not at all though.

 

As far as the sliding Deadman, I use that thing all the time for supporting longer pieces in the vice. Very convenient and quick to make when you're ready for it 

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1 hour ago, Brendon_t said:

Totally understood. I'm probably in the minority here but I either would not build for the tail vise in another roubo, or, I would have it on the other side of the bench.  Likley not at all though.

Explore this more fully for the bigger readership. Are you never working long board faces so have no need? Are you using dog holes to wedge shim or something like it? Are you using holdfasts and lathe strips? I don’t see a down side to the tail other than cost, but I see it as a huge efficiency convenience in some workflows. I’ve seen a lot on this topic about cost. I’d love to move the conversation to those other factors and why the cost is not justifiable to you after using your bench awhile. 

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1 hour ago, Tpt life said:

Explore this more fully for the bigger readership. Are you never working long board faces so have no need? Are you using dog holes to wedge shim or something like it? Are you using holdfasts and lathe strips? I don’t see a down side to the tail other than cost, but I see it as a huge efficiency convenience in some workflows. I’ve seen a lot on this topic about cost. I’d love to move the conversation to those other factors and why the cost is not justifiable to you after using your bench awhile. 

I don't have a tail vise right now but I do have the Veritas inset vise that pretty much serves the same purpose.  I would say that I use it versus the leg vise in easily a 50/50 ratio maybe even closer to 60/40 tail vise to leg vise.  I us it to hold work for router and domino work along with a lot of hand tool work.  The inset vise has served me well but I us it enough that I am looking for options for a more traditional end vise for the type of bench.

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5 hours ago, Tpt life said:

Explore this more fully for the bigger readership. Are you never working long board faces so have no need? Are you using dog holes to wedge shim or something like it? Are you using holdfasts and lathe strips? I don’t see a down side to the tail other than cost, but I see it as a huge efficiency convenience in some workflows. I’ve seen a lot on this topic about cost. I’d love to move the conversation to those other factors and why the cost is not justifiable to you after using your bench awhile. 

Happy to explain C.

In my work flow, I very rarely work with anything over 3' long. I cut rough material to length plus some with a jig saw before milling, which is machine done.

I hardly ever have the need to clamp a board end to end. Actually struggling to find when I have..

I use the dogs with hold fast and a batton for working on faces. I wedge against the Gap stop and a dog for planing.

I prefer the leg vise for general clamping although clamping in the tail does keep it 90 when closed. That is nice.

I hate the dogs coming down under the front slab. I sit at my bench to work a lot, and the dogs are in the way by finding your knee every time. I even rounded the bottoms to stop cutting up my knees but still hitting them sucks. Leaving the dogs out means I would have all the holes left over which I don't like. This is the main reason I believe I would like the system more, if it was on the back slab. I find the location a hindrance. 

In all honesty, I may have used my tail vise a total of 5 times. I do see that some things I currently do can be done with the tail vise. I guess I've never found a need to incorporate it into my flow .

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2 hours ago, Brendon_t said:

Happy to explain C.

In my work flow, I very rarely work with anything over 3' long. I cut rough material to length plus some with a jig saw before milling, which is machine done.

I hardly ever have the need to clamp a board end to end. Actually struggling to find when I have..

I use the dogs with hold fast and a batton for working on faces. I wedge against the Gap stop and a dog for planing.

I prefer the leg vise for general clamping although clamping in the tail does keep it 90 when closed. That is nice.

I hate the dogs coming down under the front slab. I sit at my bench to work a lot, and the dogs are in the way by finding your knee every time. I even rounded the bottoms to stop cutting up my knees but still hitting them sucks. Leaving the dogs out means I would have all the holes left over which I don't like. This is the main reason I believe I would like the system more, if it was on the back slab. I find the location a hindrance. 

In all honesty, I may have used my tail vise a total of 5 times. I do see that some things I currently do can be done with the tail vise. I guess I've never found a need to incorporate it into my flow .

Makes sense. I use mine a bit more, but I can understand why you might not need to. The one big annoyance I have with the tail vise is the handwheel sticking off the right side. I'd like to be able to use a handsaw to cut things to length on that side, being right handed, but I have to position my cut out past the hand wheel. This makes it less stable and causes more vibration.

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