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rodger.

New project with crazy angles

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The Rapid Fuse is a strong permanent bond. Commercial millwork shops use it to build raised panel cabinet doors. If you cut a bunch of " V " shaped thin pieces to glue inside the vertices it would go together  pretty quickly and be much stronger. Maybe 1/8" ply would work. You would need 3 per intersection.

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12 hours ago, wdwerker said:

The Rapid Fuse is a strong permanent bond. Commercial millwork shops use it to build raised panel cabinet doors. If you cut a bunch of " V " shaped thin pieces to glue inside the vertices it would go together  pretty quickly and be much stronger. Maybe 1/8" ply would work. You would need 3 per intersection.

I'm going to pick up a tube of this stuff and see how it works. Thanks.

This is it, correct?

https://www.dap.com/dap-products-ph/rapid-fuse-all-purpose-adhesive/

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That's the fast set version. The slower set version has a red label & cap. It's slightly thicker and gives you a few minutes to align parts.10- 15 minutes & it's fairly well set. Sets slower when cold, faster when it's hot. Acetone to get it off your fingers. 4oz is $10 US  it goes a long way.

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1 hour ago, wdwerker said:

That's the fast set version. The slower set version has a red label & cap. It's slightly thicker and gives you a few minutes to align parts.10- 15 minutes & it's fairly well set. Sets slower when cold, faster when it's hot. Acetone to get it off your fingers. 4oz is $10 US  it goes a long way.

Great! Thanks for the advice!

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Hi, Roger, you didn't mention the types of speakers you are using or the volume levels it will be required to produce. If it will be required to provide low frequencies at a moderate to high volume, the pressures inside the cabinet can be considerable. I suggest you give thought to splining your joints where the pieces come together or use a glue block on the back. If you are making each pentagon from plywood, this won't be as important since you would have a lot of long grain on each side.

I don't think I phrased that right, but you should get the idea. I've built a bunch of speakers cabs and still marvel at their ability to break themselves apart if you crank the volume or the base control.

I hope you let use know how they sound. The internal reflections should be crazy!

 

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8 hours ago, Robby W said:

Hi, Roger, you didn't mention the types of speakers you are using or the volume levels it will be required to produce. If it will be required to provide low frequencies at a moderate to high volume, the pressures inside the cabinet can be considerable. I suggest you give thought to splining your joints where the pieces come together or use a glue block on the back. If you are making each pentagon from plywood, this won't be as important since you would have a lot of long grain on each side.

I don't think I phrased that right, but you should get the idea. I've built a bunch of speakers cabs and still marvel at their ability to break themselves apart if you crank the volume or the base control.

I hope you let use know how they sound. The internal reflections should be crazy!

 

Thanks for the advice, but this won't be a speaker enclosure. It's for a light fixture. If you built dodecahedron speakers boxes, I would love to see them!

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If you are filling the openings with glass that will add an enormous amount of  rigidity . I glue glass into cabinet doors with Lexcel clear caulk. It smooths & cleans up with mineral spirits. Might take a couple days to completely dry. Remains slightly flexible but never peels out like silicone often does. I've got glass in doors 25 years done this way & it never rattles. Greatly strengthens the door too. A tiny bead or even dots would hold the glass in place.  

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23 hours ago, rodger. said:

Thanks for the advice, but this won't be a speaker enclosure.

Sorry . I thought I read it was going to be a speaker enclosure. That'll teach me.to participate before I am completely awake....

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To hold the corners together while glue is drying you might consider a staple.  Covers both sides of the joint, pulls them together and can be removed when done.  Put it on the inside and no one will see the pin holes they leave.

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