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IrishWood

Dryer Outlet Splitter - Buy or Make? 10-30

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I need to splitter for my 10-30r dryer outlet. I use that for my planner, jointer, table, and dryer. I’m over having to unplug them and don’t want to wait much longer to have my dad wire in some 220s and a subpanel. Been waiting 1 year now. I will only use one device as a time as it's just me and my wife here.

I almost bought the first one shown on amazon for $70 but feel I can make one. However, I’m kind of lost how the two boxes are connected to the single plug. Any tips would be helpful.

Anyone have tips on wiring the two 10-30 females with the single male plug similar to either photo? I've wired a VFD and other things but haven't 'tied' two outlet together like this before. I think I can make this for like $30 as I have spare 10awg wire. Plus I can make it this weekend and not wait a week for something to be shipped.

I'm finding out but don't quote me, the dryer 3 prong uses a neutral BUT the 3 prong for my tools is like a grounded and not neutral. I've been plugging and unplugging them without issues.

Would an issue arise if/when the dryer and a tool are plugged in together? Wouldnt that only be an issue if they are used at the same time? That wont happen because it's a 30amp breaker and I can't run two tools or the dryer and tool at the same time.

 

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Pretty sure that this will never pass the sniff test. Why that matters, you have a fire they find this in the house, insurance might not pay.

Running grounds and neutrals together could create issues. If the neutral becomes electrified anything ground that's connected to it will become electrified as well. Why this matters is generally that ground is connected to the metal of the device essentially allowing anything that touches the device to get shocked. This isn't likely but it's possible.

That said they probably just put 2 wires on the lug on the female socket. Sort of like how you'd put 2 wires on an outlet except these sockets aren't designed to have 2 wires connected. Not sure if this would count as a double tap but it still isn't using the device as designed. Aside from the above issues as long as the wires are sized properly to the overcurrent protection (breaker) the worst that would happen is you'd trip the breaker if both were ran.

I suggest motivating your dad to come do it right. I often bribe my dad to get electrical work done.

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7 minutes ago, Chestnut said:

 

I suggest motivating your dad to come do it right. I often bribe my dad to get electrical work done.

Totally agreed!  

My buddies can also be talked into stuff with the barter system. Beer for work!

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Installing a sub-panel isn't rocket surgery. Go to the home center & buy a book on home wiring & all the materials you need. If you can get dad over for dinner, pick his brain a little. That alone will probably motivate him to do it, or at least help you do it. 

Putting together a mickey mouse solution is just money & time that could have been spent on doing the sub-panel.

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I'm with Chestnut. Common and ground can be together but I'm not a fan of that. I worked in electrical at Lowe's. All panels I saw had hot/common/ground bars; separate bars.

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7 hours ago, Bankstick said:

I'm with Chestnut. Common and ground can be together but I'm not a fan of that. I worked in electrical at Lowe's. All panels I saw had hot/common/ground bars; separate bars.

The neutral conductor & the ground wire cannot be together. The only time they can be electrically connected to each other is where the neutral is bonded to ground in the service compartment. Very important to observe this.

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Agree with @drzaius. Although the electrical circuit will be completed when using a common neutral / ground, doing so presents electrical shock and fire hazards. The rules were designed to keep you and your family safe. Stick with them.

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