VizslaDad

New Shop Build in NE Ohio

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16 hours ago, Tom King said:

I'd tear the whole garage down, build it adjoining the house, make the ridge the same height as the other end,  and same roof slope, with a matching hip.  You could make it as wide as you wanted to.  Draw 24', and see what it looks like. 

Yeah this is what I was going to write up. Maybe keep the garage in the same location but add the workshop between the house and garage instead of the breezeway.

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27 minutes ago, AJ_Engineer said:

Yeah this is what I was going to write up. Maybe keep the garage in the same location but add the workshop between the house and garage instead of the breezeway.

CEO and I are set on the breezeway (house does not have a mudroom but we need one, and she likes the look we have in mind). Plus the end of the house closest to the garage contains our living room and master bedroom. Not only would would this create much more complex surgery to the house proper than I care to get into myself, but I would be hard pressed to sufficiently abate noise and vibration to an acceptable level. I do appreciate the thoughts though! 

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On 1/29/2019 at 6:19 PM, VizslaDad said:

My little drawings don’t make it clear but I am planning on 9’ ceilings. My last shop was right at 8’ and it was a pita!

10' would be better - it would give clearance to actually lift/carry long things more easily... I don't know how I got by in garages with 8-9' ceilings before I moved into the current shop. I'm NEVER going back to low ceilings. 

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1 hour ago, Robert Morse said:

10' would be better - it would give clearance to actually lift/carry long things more easily... I don't know how I got by in garages with 8-9' ceilings before I moved into the current shop. I'm NEVER going back to low ceilings. 

I followed your shop build closely, and it definitely looks like yours is a great living proof example!

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Just curious because I live on a property with many on the same characteristics....what impact will the breezeway have on accessing the back yard with equipment like skid-steers, backhoes & such?  Does the swale/ditch cut the whole property in half?

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1 hour ago, RJS said:

Just curious because I live on a property with many on the same characteristics....what impact will the breezeway have on accessing the back yard with equipment like skid-steers, backhoes & such?  Does the swale/ditch cut the whole property in half?

Hey @RJS - great question. The swale definitely cuts the back yard in half, to a point where it drops sharply into a ravine. This will make for a number of nice launching point for a zip line and some future mountain bike/ski trails. The CEO has also requested a series of bridges in the future...hopefully those will help justify a new chainsaw purchase. :)

The driveway/parking area in front of the garage and house is slightly elevated from the area between the house and garage. There is one stone step down to a sloped path that leads into the eastern part of the back yard. The breezeway will eliminate the possibility for anything larger than a riding lawnmower to get back there, though for practical purposes that is not a problem.

The setback from my property line to the garage is only 10-15 feet, and mostly tree-lined. 

"E Yard" in my drawing below is a fairly confined area due to the deep swale and ravines. EMS could get to that yard through my neighbors property in the event of a catastrophe. We have a little bridge by the deck across the swale, and a person can cross the swale itself (albeit with zero expectations of staying clean and dry) when it's not super nasty outside.

 rough_plan_of_property.thumb.jpg.7970e4f669d020f107ca28b7c8e4b760.jpg

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3 hours ago, drzaius said:

Agreed. My ceiling is 9'6" & it wouldn't bother me at all to have another 6". (that's NOT what she said)

All laughter aside, I am now reconsidering my desire to keep the shop floor level with the garage. So long as I can safely keep surface moisture at bay I think I'm going to try to shoot for steps down to the shop level to maximize the height. 

Heck, I've dealt with mechanically lifting stuff in my prior shops just fine.

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4 hours ago, VizslaDad said:

All laughter aside, I am now reconsidering my desire to keep the shop floor level with the garage. So long as I can safely keep surface moisture at bay I think I'm going to try to shoot for steps down to the shop level to maximize the height. 

Heck, I've dealt with mechanically lifting stuff in my prior shops just fine.

Some jurisdictions may have issues with steps down to another enclosed living type space from the garage due to carbon monoxide issues. May be OK if you technically call it 'storage/more garage' but something to ask the building dept.

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14 hours ago, AJ_Engineer said:

Some jurisdictions may have issues with steps down to another enclosed living type space from the garage due to carbon monoxide issues. May be OK if you technically call it 'storage/more garage' but something to ask the building dept.

I know around here there has to be a step up or a curb from the garage into a living space, but I don't know how high that is. Not sure what would be required in this case, but it's something that needs to be considered.

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@drzaius & @AJ_Engineer oh, good point. I also worry that the need for stairs down to a lower level will impact my working floor space, and my original approximate plan was pushing the CEO's acceptable tolerance for eating up backyard outdoor space. 

 

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That does look like a pain in the butt...having said that what an upgrade to go from one ckt to a sub panel, opens up a lot of options.

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14 hours ago, pkinneb said:

That does look like a pain in the butt...having said that what an upgrade to go from one ckt to a sub panel, opens up a lot of options.

Well I was going to build a whole separate building from scratch, and was excited to do so, so this is only a minor PITA. The challenge now will be to do just enough wiring to get started and have a little room to grow but not so much I have to rip it all apart and redo it when the inevitable shop reconfigurations occur. 

1 hour ago, Chestnut said:

Looks like you are working towards a shop again. That will be exciting once you get set up.

Yup. Never really stopped, just had little of consequence to share. I am excited to be off and running now though. 

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As far as the wiring its not much more trouble to prep the building for 220 from the house. You dont need to wire in the 220 circuits in the shop until you need them but when you do it will make life a lot easier if the run from the house was already in and wired to your sub panel in the shop.

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On 1/30/2019 at 6:13 PM, Tom King said:

I'd tear the whole garage down, build it adjoining the house, make the ridge the same height as the other end,  and same roof slope, with a matching hip.  You could make it as wide as you wanted to.  Draw 24', and see what it looks like.

Many times rebuilding costs not much more, may even take less time than a half-rebuild, and will give you want you want. Becaue that seems to be the dilemma.

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1 hour ago, collinb said:

Many times rebuilding costs not much more, may even take less time than a half-rebuild, and will give you want you want. Becaue that seems to be the dilemma.

No kidding. I drove past a local Taco Bell recently, with "Closed for Remodeling" on the sign.

The building had disappeared.  

That sometimes works out for a corporation, but rarely for an individual. At least, not me.

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58 minutes ago, VizslaDad said:

I paid an electrician to wire and energize my new 60amp panel in the shop/garage. He tied it into my main panel. Apparently, technically, the panel in the shop/garage is not a sub panel. It has its own ground rod etc. 

If thats the case odds are you are already prepped for 220. If you were to look inside the box and you have two heavy black cables and a neutral line coming in you’re set. Did he put a breaker in the main panel for the shop or jumper on to the mains? If a breaker and its a ganged double its 220.

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49 minutes ago, Gary Beasley said:

If thats the case odds are you are already prepped for 220. If you were to look inside the box and you have two heavy black cables and a neutral line coming in you’re set. Did he put a breaker in the main panel for the shop or jumper on to the mains? If a breaker and its a ganged double its 220.

Yes, that's the setup!

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