Chip Sawdust

Stringing, Fluting, Beading and such

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I was amazed a Forstner bit could cut this stuff, but it worked. I fed it VERY slowly...

after cutting the 45s I used a file to help flatten the tooth marks

 

Some 10-32 hardware to fasten things all together 

5FAE81AF-338A-424A-86B5-4F73E4B39617.jpeg

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I’ll be using this on the pattern I’m putting on the wife’s end tables. I’ll start a thread for that project when it’s done. They’re not super duper beautiful but they’re ok, especially for my first attempt at stringing and banding on furniture I designed. It’s always a learning process that’s for sure.  

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Chip, 

As someone who owns about every stringing and inlay tool ever made I think that I can make a few suggestions. When I’m doing straight line stringing I’ve learned to use a Dremel fitted with a good base and guide ( my favorite is the Veritas; it’s pricey). The biggest challenge is finding a bit that is the same diameter as the string thickness. I purchase my bits from Precision Tools. I use Latta’s radius cutter for curves; however, you gotta be careful because the blade on the cutter is pretty thick and creates a wide groove and can cause tear out. This is a problem if your string is thin. 

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15 hours ago, Hammer5573 said:

Chip, 

As someone who owns about every stringing and inlay tool ever made I think that I can make a few suggestions. When I’m doing straight line stringing I’ve learned to use a Dremel fitted with a good base and guide ( my favorite is the Veritas; it’s pricey). The biggest challenge is finding a bit that is the same diameter as the string thickness. I purchase my bits from Precision Tools. I use Latta’s radius cutter for curves; however, you gotta be careful because the blade on the cutter is pretty thick and creates a wide groove and can cause tear out. This is a problem if your string is thin. 

I agree, Hammer. I put a fence on the StewMac base for straight lines... I have the hand cutter and scratch stock tools, but tbh the Dremel is my go-to as it’s sort of fool proof and consistent. The sizing die for string tapers the string a little which helps it fit snugly into those grooves. This project the bit was 3/64” and that seems to work well, although I have five different sizes :) 

Thanks for the feedback, I love hearing from people who have put a few hundred yards of string in furniture! :) 

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I thought about a border on the table top but these I’m trying to keep a little more simple. I have other things to get to right away, although from now on all my furniture projects may have some sort of strIng, banding or other kinds of inlay. It’s fun, relaxing and addictive, so if you start doing it, just know it’s like all other woodworking avenues, once you start you can’t stop! :)  

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Fantastic job on those circles, they look perfect (even when I zoomed the picture:)).

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