Stringing, Fluting, Beading and such


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So here’s the end product for this project. Just in time for wifey’s birthday too (coincidence)  

It’s actually a lot of fun, once you get set up   Here are three of the four circles; hopefully I’ll get this bit done tonight. 

I cut a plug out of alder and just cross-grained the installation for the visual effect. Started trimming the high spots on the strings with the bevel down on a chisel, then went to my scraper (which

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I’ll be using this on the pattern I’m putting on the wife’s end tables. I’ll start a thread for that project when it’s done. They’re not super duper beautiful but they’re ok, especially for my first attempt at stringing and banding on furniture I designed. It’s always a learning process that’s for sure.  

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Chip, 

As someone who owns about every stringing and inlay tool ever made I think that I can make a few suggestions. When I’m doing straight line stringing I’ve learned to use a Dremel fitted with a good base and guide ( my favorite is the Veritas; it’s pricey). The biggest challenge is finding a bit that is the same diameter as the string thickness. I purchase my bits from Precision Tools. I use Latta’s radius cutter for curves; however, you gotta be careful because the blade on the cutter is pretty thick and creates a wide groove and can cause tear out. This is a problem if your string is thin. 

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15 hours ago, Hammer5573 said:

Chip, 

As someone who owns about every stringing and inlay tool ever made I think that I can make a few suggestions. When I’m doing straight line stringing I’ve learned to use a Dremel fitted with a good base and guide ( my favorite is the Veritas; it’s pricey). The biggest challenge is finding a bit that is the same diameter as the string thickness. I purchase my bits from Precision Tools. I use Latta’s radius cutter for curves; however, you gotta be careful because the blade on the cutter is pretty thick and creates a wide groove and can cause tear out. This is a problem if your string is thin. 

I agree, Hammer. I put a fence on the StewMac base for straight lines... I have the hand cutter and scratch stock tools, but tbh the Dremel is my go-to as it’s sort of fool proof and consistent. The sizing die for string tapers the string a little which helps it fit snugly into those grooves. This project the bit was 3/64” and that seems to work well, although I have five different sizes :) 

Thanks for the feedback, I love hearing from people who have put a few hundred yards of string in furniture! :) 

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I thought about a border on the table top but these I’m trying to keep a little more simple. I have other things to get to right away, although from now on all my furniture projects may have some sort of strIng, banding or other kinds of inlay. It’s fun, relaxing and addictive, so if you start doing it, just know it’s like all other woodworking avenues, once you start you can’t stop! :)  

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Thanks gents, it’s fun stuff indeed. I still love my Greene and Greene styles but this adds another option to my skill set. It’s a bit cumbersome to get set up for, but easier than I thought once I actually lais stringing into the surface. 

Next I’m building a curved-front desk, and I full plan to add some inlay accents to it that weren’t part of the original plan :) 

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Chip,

It’s great to hear that us “Federalists (federal style woodworkers)” have another dedicated student of this style. No federal  piece would be complete without the addition of an Oval Fan inlay (the holy grail of federal inlays; see below). I’ve made more than I care to count and I still don’t feel comfortable making them; however, if you would like a few tips on making them (learned from numerous screw ups) let me know I’d be happy to assist

 

5D2A85A6-6F2C-4645-8242-C9ED68D178AD.jpeg

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16 hours ago, Hammer5573 said:

Chip,

It’s great to hear that us “Federalists (federal style woodworkers)” have another dedicated student of this style. No federal  piece would be complete without the addition of an Oval Fan inlay (the holy grail of federal inlays; see below). I’ve made more than I care to count and I still don’t feel comfortable making them; however, if you would like a few tips on making them (learned from numerous screw ups) let me know I’d be happy to assist

 

5D2A85A6-6F2C-4645-8242-C9ED68D178AD.jpeg

Hammer,

I would absolutely love to get hints and tips on oval inlays! I wanted to put them on the legs of these tables, but expediency called for getting wifey’s tables done and I’ve never done ovals so the added time would’ve run me late on the project  *shrug*

I’d be happy to share some lessons I’ve had on shaded lunette banding, Greek key banding and other stuff if you’re interested. 

You can PM me or just post here for others to share and learn; feel free! I think a piece of furniture isn’t really Federal without ovals, and possibly bellflowers or similar accents. 

I don’t have a scroll saw but I think I’m seeing one in my future :) 

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PS, I’ve already scouted out 100 grit sand on Amazon and have a gas stove in the kitchen so I’ll be covered when it comes to shading. Now I need to convince my wife she needs new pots and pans so I can steal one from her inventory lol

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On 4/25/2019 at 5:46 AM, Mark J said:

Fantastic job on those circles, they look perfect (even when I zoomed the picture:)).

Thanks Mark,

They’re not perfect but they turned out pretty good with the jury-rigged router base I made. So far I’m happy with the results :) 

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9 hours ago, Chip Sawdust said:

Hammer,

I would absolutely love to get hints and tips on oval inlays! I wanted to put them on the legs of these tables, but expediency called for getting wifey’s tables done and I’ve never done ovals so the added time would’ve run me late on the project  *shrug*

I’d be happy to share some lessons I’ve had on shaded lunette banding, Greek key banding and other stuff if you’re interested. 

You can PM me or just post here for others to share and learn; feel free! I think a piece of furniture isn’t really Federal without ovals, and possibly bellflowers or similar accents. 

I don’t have a scroll saw but I think I’m seeing one in my future :) 

Chip,

Look up Rob Millard on YouTube. He’s a great Federal woodworker and part of his video about making fan inlays is posted. You can purchase the full video for a nominal fee on his website. I use his techniques with a few modifications.

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On 4/26/2019 at 6:31 PM, Hammer5573 said:

Chip,

Look up Rob Millard on YouTube. He’s a great Federal woodworker and part of his video about making fan inlays is posted. You can purchase the full video for a nominal fee on his website. I use his techniques with a few modifications.

Rob Millard, I may have seen one of his videos. Thanks Hammer, I’ll look him up today :) 

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On 4/27/2019 at 5:00 AM, Mark J said:

And maybe a small propane fueled camp stove.

Yes a cast iron skillet would be perfect; I may be in for a trip to Goodwill. 

I think I can talk my wife into letting me use the gas stove in the kitchen I’ll tell her it’s safer :) (and I think it is). I have an old Svea camp stove from the 70s, that thing should’ve scared is back then but instead we thought it was the cat’s meow! 

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