Chip Sawdust

Stringing, Fluting, Beading and such

Recommended Posts

3 hours ago, wtnhighlander said:

That looks pretty good to me!

Have you considered trying hide glue? The slipperiness before tacking up is supposed to make it easier to fit tight joints together, maybe it would help with tight inlay, too.

I have thought about hide glue a lot, but I’m rather a disciple of Steve Latta who uses yellow glue exclusively on his stringing and banding. When he makes various banding, he recommends hide glue but so far I’ve avoided it. If I go into something, I tend to go with all four feet, so I’d need the constant temp pot, the granules and the whole bit :) The pot is around $160 I think, last time I looked. That stops the show right there, since I have other things I want worse! 

Thanks for the input though, and one day when I’m better at this and have the hide glue setup I may opt for it to see how it works. 

2 hours ago, Tom King said:

I've seen worse than that on really old, nice pieces of furniture, that I'm sure were built by pros, and the piece sold for a lot of money in its time.   

You're building your skill level very fast with this, and I appreciate your posting about it.   This is one thing I've done very little of.

Haha thanks Tom. I aim for perfection but more likely than not I settle for what gets done...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I plan to take a class from Steve Latta in may.. stringin , etc.  Am really looking forward to it.

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 1/6/2020 at 1:25 PM, Ronn W said:

I plan to take a class from Steve Latta in may.. stringin , etc.  Am really looking forward to it.

Of that I am envious! We’re out west where there are some woodworking classes available but Latta is my go-to source for most of this stuff. You simply must report back here some stuff you learned! :) 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 9/1/2019 at 8:09 PM, woodydixon said:

No problem Chip. I'm not entirely clear on what you are showing me. Did you cut the rabbit all the way across the front at first and then fill in the front of the middle part with a scrap piece to line up with the edge of the blade? When cut mine I just chiseled out each side separately. Also, are the cutters mounted straight up and down in the holder or are they slanted so that the inlay would be tapered? I have used wood screws to hold the cutters but it looks like the LN version has some sort of cap or barrel nut on the back. Would did you use?

Mine is cutting better when I finally was able to get a burr on the cutter and I started using 1/16 inch inlay. Thanks for your help.

 

Woody

I have Latta's video on sharpening those thicknessing cutters. He drags the blade about 60 degrees across some sandpaper (didn't say what grit but I'd guess 240-360 would work) then, since it's more of a scraper than a cutter, he puts a small burr on it after dragging it across the sandpaper. The burr is what does the cutting, of course.

He mentions making sure you put that bit of an angle on it as well, so the veneer drops into the gap easier. They come from LN that way. I find this also helps put a small taper on the stringing which assists in slipping it into the groove. If it were the same thickness all the way you'd have to be more precise than I normally am, so it's a bit of a cheat but it works. :)

For pieces that have some knots in them, or other irregularities, he recommends pulling a larger piece through, such that you haven't cut a string off it yet. The other fibers in the wood will help hold it together. You get good shavings off it that way and don't destroy a piece of stringing.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Who's Online   0 Members, 0 Anonymous, 91 Guests (See full list)

    There are no registered users currently online

  • Forum Statistics

    28777
    Total Topics
    388719
    Total Posts
  • Member Statistics

    21735
    Total Members
    1529
    Most Online
    Guest
    Newest Member
    Guest
    Joined