SawDustB

Hand tool cabinet in maple

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1 hour ago, Chestnut said:

So much of what I've read indicates that running anything on PVC has little effect on minimizing this but maybe it will. I'd give it a try and report back i'm interested to see how this works in the real world.

Ducting is a all PVC and i never installed anything to direct the static and don't seem to ever get shocked by it. I also never get that close to the ducts.

Like I said, I'm not overly concerned about having problems if I don't ground it. I'm an EE in my day job, and I'm used to grounding everything to protect against RF and lightning. These are obviously not a concern here ;). But for grounding against static, the bar is really low. Basically anything at all conductive is enough. The copper tape should take me a couple minutes to do, unlike the screws, wire nuts, and terminals that most people seem to do.

I'm going to be brushing by this setup all the time, which is the main reason I'm bothering. I already got a couple of small zaps from it. But if there's enough charge to jump the air gap to me, the copper on the surface should be able to dissipate it first. Aluminum tape might also work, but I know this stuff has conductive adhesive on it.

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26 minutes ago, SawDustB said:

Like I said, I'm not overly concerned about having problems if I don't ground it. I'm an EE in my day job, and I'm used to grounding everything to protect against RF and lightning. These are obviously not a concern here ;). But for grounding against static, the bar is really low. Basically anything at all conductive is enough. The copper tape should take me a couple minutes to do, unlike the screws, wire nuts, and terminals that most people seem to do.

I'm going to be brushing by this setup all the time, which is the main reason I'm bothering. I already got a couple of small zaps from it. But if there's enough charge to jump the air gap to me, the copper on the surface should be able to dissipate it first. Aluminum tape might also work, but I know this stuff has conductive adhesive on it.

Oh dang EE don't mean to step on your toes.... :D. I'll show my self the door.

Interesting conductive adhesive that surprises me for some reason.

I don't mean this offensively, but i have no idea what EEs do. Like i know there are those that deal with computers, and then some that deal with power generation and distribution but i assume as with most engineering fields the depth of the field is far greater than what those on the out side know. Crap this got off topic sorry.

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2 minutes ago, Chestnut said:

Crap this got off topic sorry.

Just a little :P but that is what makes it interesting around here ... and educational.

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5 hours ago, Chestnut said:

Oh dang EE don't mean to step on your toes.... :D. I'll show my self the door.

Interesting conductive adhesive that surprises me for some reason.

I don't mean this offensively, but i have no idea what EEs do. Like i know there are those that deal with computers, and then some that deal with power generation and distribution but i assume as with most engineering fields the depth of the field is far greater than what those on the out side know. Crap this got off topic sorry.

No toes harmed in the course of this discussion :D. I completely understand wanting to know why, rather than accepting conventional wisdom. I tend to be the same way, must be an engineer thing. I'll let you know if I see a difference - I'm curious myself. The way I view it, it can't do any harm, and it's easy.

The copper tape is used for a few things, but one of our primary uses is to prevent radiated emissions from equipment. It can be used to tape over seams in boxes or enclosures to prevent RF from leaking out. For that to be effective, you want it to be conductive so it's a decent electrical joint. You can get it where it's not specified as conductive and it's a bit cheaper. I've also seen it used to mock up a circuit board where the geometry was important, since it's easy to modify using the tape.

As with all engineers, EEs do a variety of things. Like you said, some are in power systems, others end up dealing with plant controls, or some like me are involved in electronics design. I'm involved with a company that designs high power radio frequency systems for a range of applications. My piece of it is mostly the signal processing and control to make them work. A lot of that entails writing software on a DSP or embedded processor, as well as some circuit board design.

5 hours ago, Chet said:

Just a little :P but that is what makes it interesting around here ... and educational.

Maybe a lot :D. I started it when I posted the DC though. I promise, I'll try to post something with wood being worked soon.

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So I realized that the divider above the cubbies could come out of an interestingly flawed board I have, except it wasn't wide enough. The back couple inches won't really be seen, so I'm gluing on my scraps before I plane it and cut it to width. It seems a little ridiculous, but the alternative was using one of my pieces that are intended for the door frames.20190317_124521.thumb.jpg.b24d5008aac6bd3baba8a08b783b9300.jpg

Once that's dry, I can start on the pieces for the inside of the case. For the top piece that is more visible, I've decided to go with a splined miter joint, with continuous grain.

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I would bet that by the time you get it planed it won't even show.  Not much different then a full sized panel just not centered.  

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1 hour ago, Chet said:

I would bet that by the time you get it planed it won't even show.  Not much different then a full sized panel just not centered.  

I'm not worried about it. The plane till covers it almost entirely. I glued on three scraps to get the full width :D. I just really wanted that board to be the visible part you'd be looking at with the door open.

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Lol...I did the same thing yesterday for the front laminate for the Roubo.  What did Eric say?  "Jimmy crack corn?"

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1 hour ago, bleedinblue said:

Lol...I did the same thing yesterday for the front laminate for the Roubo.  What did Eric say?  "Jimmy crack corn?"

Yeah, I had a few of those in the Roubo too. The back legs on my bench both have inner faces pieced together from scrap. That project seemed to generate so much wood that was 2" wide and useless for any project parts.

The piece I glued actually looks pretty good after cleanup, although my planer was being annoying. The boards coming out the other end were varying by 1/32" in thickness, so I went right past 5/8" and ended closer to 9/16". It should still work, but I wasn't happy.

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17 minutes ago, pkinneb said:

I'm digging the splines they should look great!!

Thanks! Here they are after cleaning off the joint:907822761_20190323_1131002.thumb.jpg.f3610a58412d4c964af97325db6863e4.jpg

My planer gave me a bunch of washboard effect on this piece I have to remove, but you get the idea.

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Did you source the material for your epoxy crotch panels? I think it's awesome that Matt constantly rocks the boat in the woodworking world.Tell him you can't do something and he'll do it just to see why and see if he can make it work.

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4 minutes ago, Chestnut said:

Did you source the material for your epoxy crotch panels? I think it's awesome that Matt constantly rocks the boat in the woodworking world.Tell him you can't do something and he'll do it just to see why and see if he can make it work.

Yeah, his panels are pretty amazing. I just watched his videos on it. No big band saw here though, and I don't think my hand saw is going to cut it.

I'm still thinking about what to do for the panels. I actually considered going in a totally different direction and using copper (possibly with chemically induced patina) as a decorative layer over the plywood, but I don't know. If I could find some nice veneer to use locally, I'd probably go that route. It seems like it's all online, and getting it to Canada is a pain.

There are times when I really regret the lack of a band saw... Some shop sawn veneer would solve my dilemma.

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6 hours ago, SawDustB said:

Thanks! Here they are after cleaning off the joint:907822761_20190323_1131002.thumb.jpg.f3610a58412d4c964af97325db6863e4.jpg

My planer gave me a bunch of washboard effect on this piece I have to remove, but you get the idea.

I'm really digging that! Great Job!

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5 minutes ago, SawDustB said:

Yeah, his panels are pretty amazing. I just watched his videos on it. No big band saw here though, and I don't think my hand saw is going to cut it.

I'm still thinking about what to do for the panels. I actually considered going in a totally different direction and using copper (possibly with chemically induced patina) as a decorative layer over the plywood, but I don't know. If I could find some nice veneer to use locally, I'd probably go that route. It seems like it's all online, and getting it to Canada is a pain.

There are times when I really regret the lack of a band saw... Some shop sawn veneer would solve my dilemma.

I know you are heavier in hand tools than most have you thought about a frame saw or .... what's the resaw equivalent in the hand tool world? I've seen Shannon resaw some big panels on Instagram and it seems to go really quickly and easily.

Cremona's bandsaw did a good job for the wide panels but he did have a lot of waste. He basically got a pair of 0.1" thick panels from a roughly 3/4" board.

I am also loving the splines in the shelf that looks awesome. You and Art are making me want to start building one of these right now.

P.S. I was talking to Pkinneb about the panels and mentioned that a 22" resaw isn't necessary one could do an 11" resaw and book match each door.

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4 minutes ago, Chestnut said:

I know you are heavier in hand tools than most have you thought about a frame saw or .... what's the resaw equivalent in the hand tool world? I've seen Shannon resaw some big panels on Instagram and it seems to go really quickly and easily.

Cremona's bandsaw did a good job for the wide panels but he did have a lot of waste. He basically got a pair of 0.1" thick panels from a roughly 3/4" board.

I am also loving the splines in the shelf that looks awesome. You and Art are making me want to start building one of these right now.

P.S. I was talking to Pkinneb about the panels and mentioned that a 22" resaw isn't necessary one could do an 11" resaw and book match each door.

I'm still a bit light in the saw department. I've got joinery saws and a couple others, but nothing like a frame saw. Honestly I do some things by hand mostly out of necessity, since I'm in a small space. It was either the Roubo or a jointer, and I think I chose correctly.

The idea is intriguing, but what I really want is to find a spot for one of the nicer 14" band saws... In the mean time,I should probably just search for a veneer supplier that has better shipping to Canada.

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