JohnG

Photography

Recommended Posts

One of those bad boys nearly slammed the side of my truck today, diving in for a road-side meal. They are much larger than they appear when perched on the powerlines!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I placed the flower at my basement door and turned the interior lights out, lit by sunlight diffused by neighboring trees. Exposure was 8 seconds at f/64. Film was Fuji Acros developed in Rodinal 1:50. Done with my 4x5 Ebony and 150mm Caltar lens.

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have been playing around with extension tube macro. The struggle for me is deciding what should be in focus with such and incredibly shallow depth of field. 

31B61B53-297F-460D-97BB-9C0607D753D9.jpeg

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You might want to do a little research on focus stacking. Theres free programs you can download that will do the focus merge. Photoshop CS6 also has it integral. With a little care you can get stunning looking depth of field on macro shots..

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The main aim is to get the right amount of depth for the shot. Stopping down more will eventually result in diffraction problems and you will lose the sharpness you are fighting for. If you can use your lens at a middle aperture like f/8 and get the depth you need the image will be sharper. Ive seen this technique done with landscapes too.
This is a digital thing and extremely hard to do with film.

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Diffraction is something to consider but also consider, out of focus clarity is often a worse offender than diffraction. When in doubt go for a higher f stop.Though as always this depends on a LOT of factors. Sensor/film size, lens, focal length, focus distance, subject.

Shooting a portriat with a 300mm f2.8 is far different than a landscape with a 20mm f1.8

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Theres a platform jig you can buy for your camera pretty cheap you can mount on your tripod and put your camera on it that will allow you to move the camera precise distances between each shot. When you are focusing that close its better to set your focus distance on the lens then move the camera back and forth to get it focused where you want it. As you shoot you shift the camera a tiny amount each time to get overlap of the sharp areas. I got one like this.

https://www.ebay.com/itm/184018340507

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That sounds like a neat DIY project, too. I want to build a similar jig to hold mt phone on a tripod so that the lens is precisely on the vertical axis when the head is rotated. For making clean 360 panoramas.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • Who's Online   1 Member, 0 Anonymous, 190 Guests (See full list)

  • Forum Statistics

    28770
    Total Topics
    388570
    Total Posts
  • Member Statistics

    21730
    Total Members
    1529
    Most Online
    all5ofus@ptd.net
    Newest Member
    all5ofus@ptd.net
    Joined