JohnG

Photography

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Fun fact about Georgia O'Keeffe, She was married to a photographer and was also friends with Ansel Adams. Alfred Steglitz, her husband, was one of the first supporters of Adams.

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5 hours ago, Chestnut said:

Alfred Steglitz

If memory serves me correct, wasn't Alfred Stieglitz one of the people that was instrumental in getting photography recognized as an art form?

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4 hours ago, Chet said:

If memory serves me correct, wasn't Alfred Stieglitz one of the people that was instrumental in getting photography recognized as an art form?

Yes he was.

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1 hour ago, curlyoak said:

FA4092D5-EBF2-40E5-8034-997E37C34758.thumb.jpeg.35b94ae3189e45c5b608fd9fffd8c2d0.jpeg

On the sidewalk in front  of a local redneck bar...

Two out of three ain’t bad! 

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Those high-res monochromes are awesome at highlighting the texture, light, and shadow in those tightly-cropped images. This sort of thing is what makes me think of a photograph as 'art'. Well done, Gary!

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I'd love to shoot large format film. I hope when my life gets a chance to slow down in 30 years the equipment and film is still available. Being able to play with the tilts and swings has always interested me.

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A large format digital can be simulated now, using software to stitch multiple exposures into a single image, panorama-style. Surely someone is developing a device to take multiple, simultaneous exposures through an array of lenses in a single device, and stitch the results into a single, high-resolution digital image. With all the lenses & sensors at fixed, known distances from one another, and captured simultaneously, it seems like the stitching would be even simpler that making a panorama from serial exposures.

 

There is already this thing for taking multiple focal lengths in one digital camera package.

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16 hours ago, Gary Beasley said:

In 30 years they may well have affordable large format digital backs. We’ll see.

Maybe but a true photographic print is something that can't quite be reproduced by a printer. I've seen some Ansel Adams originals and they have an almost 3d quality to them (I've seen other photographs i just can't remember the artist that captured them...). The digital will be a LOT easier :D.

14 hours ago, wtnhighlander said:

A large format digital can be simulated now, using software to stitch multiple exposures into a single image, panorama-style. Surely someone is developing a device to take multiple, simultaneous exposures through an array of lenses in a single device, and stitch the results into a single, high-resolution digital image. With all the lenses & sensors at fixed, known distances from one another, and captured simultaneously, it seems like the stitching would be even simpler that making a panorama from serial exposures.

 

There is already this thing for taking multiple focal lengths in one digital camera package.

I stitch panoramas, and idk what you  call the square version of a panorama, quite often but it's difficult to control your focal plane the same way as you can with a view camera. The different movements a view camera makes changes so much about the pictures and keeping subjects in focus.

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I do have a digital capable medium format system with swings, tilts and shifts. Fuji GX680III. A pain to use digital on it because the digital back does not integrate into the camera controls by much, you need an external controller set up with it. Best used in studio work. Nice part about the back is it will go on my Mamiya 645 AFD, thats fun to shoot.

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49 minutes ago, Chestnut said:

Maybe but a true photographic print is something that can't quite be reproduced by a printer. I've seen some Ansel Adams originals and they have an almost 3d quality to them (I've seen other photographs i just can't remember the artist that captured them...). The digital will be a LOT easier :D.

I stitch panoramas, and idk what you  call the square version of a panorama, quite often but it's difficult to control your focal plane the same way as you can with a view camera. The different movements a view camera makes changes so much about the pictures and keeping subjects in focus.

There have been and still are LF photographers who  shoot 8x10 and up who process in simple trays then contact print with a bare bulb hanging from the ceiling of their minimal darkroom, as well as those using even older processes like glass plate and hand coated ambrotype and tintype and color processes that date back over a hundred years like Autochrome and three color images.

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23 hours ago, Gary Beasley said:

While the others were pointing their cameras at a rushing stream I found a fork in the road and was pointing my lens at the ground.728D14C1-461E-4C9F-A4E7-9D39D3FC6D88.thumb.jpeg.e4035de682b80b0bcc3014d1032ed7f0.jpeg

So the question is, when you came to a fork in the road, did you take it?

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No I left it for another traveller to take. As a matter of fact one of the other photographers found it and made his own still life with it after I was done with it. Its still there waiting for the next wanderer to encounter.

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2 hours ago, Gary Beasley said:

There have been and still are LF photographers who  shoot 8x10 and up who process in simple trays then contact print with a bare bulb hanging from the ceiling of their minimal darkroom, as well as those using even older processes like glass plate and hand coated ambrotype and tintype and color processes that date back over a hundred years like Autochrome and three color images.

There is a camera shop not far from my house that does LF lessons for both camera movements and darkroom procedures. It's like once a year but I still think it'd be interesting to take the course. It's not cheap but i think it'd be worth it.

I have all the stuff to setup a simple dark room and do contact prints but i never bought a LF camera. I was goign to develop B&W from my hasssie 503 c/m but i devote most of my time to woodworking. Photography is one of those fun projects I want to get to some day but furniture needs to be made for the house.

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